Using floor leveler on subfloor and then nailing in hardwood?

Hi all,
I keep reading that the key to good hardwood installation is a level subfloor.
I am removing my carpet and need to level my plywood subfloor. I noticed on the package of floor leveler that it's concrete based. It didn't mention anything about hardwood - just tile and such.
Won't it chip and crack if I nail in the hardwood through the floor leveler?
Or are people not nailing in hardwood anymore?
Thanks,
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snipped-for-privacy@HOTMAIL.COM wrote:

Can't see why a hardwood floor would need to be installed on a level subfloor. Flat I can understand but level shouldn't matter. I doubt any floor leveling material is going to be able to hold a nail it is weaker than standard concrete. All that said, I have heard of hardwood floors being glued down but don't know anything about it.
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Some hardwood floors get nailed but ones also called Laminate or Engineered wood floors often snap together and float on top of the subfloor, in which case are not nailed.
You can nail through a thin layer of leveling but you may need to select slightly longer thanil than usual to make sure you get a good bite in the wood.
Wood floors can usually accomodate some unevenness in the subfloor (especially pitts as opposed to peaks) leveling is not as critical as it would be for vinyl. The planks tend to bridge the imperfections. In other words, you may not to use leveling compound unless the floor is really uneven, a good sanding might be enough.
Be sure to fix any squeeks before covering the subfloor, its the best opportunity you will get.
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I think what you're referring to a level plywood floor--usually tongue and groove subflooring with 1/8 inch gaps between the grooves for expansion. No cupping, no raised joints, no nail heads, etc.
Why would you use a concrete leveler on a wood floor for wood floor installation?
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snipped-for-privacy@HOTMAIL.COM wrote:

No don't use a concrete based leveler. Even if you do get a nail through the stuff without bending the nail. It will more often than not, break up or shatter a bit. If you absolutely had to use the stuff...glue the floor down on the patch and nail everywhere else. If the area's aren't that bad, circle the "low spot" with a lumber crayon, get some really thin door skin and put down one to a few layers of the skin, and that will help make the floor more flat without all the hassle of the self leveler. Good luck, Steve
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the key to a good flooring installation is a good subfloor but real hard wood is forgiving. That is a big reason why it is so popular snipped-for-privacy@HOTMAIL.COM wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@HOTMAIL.COM wrote:

For our hardwood installation there was a patch of floor that was very uneven. I used some self-leveling compound without any trouble. It was only slightly more difficult than the plywood to staple the boards, and the staples were plenty long enough to go completely through it to the plywood below. It did tend to crumble if I had to remove a staple, but not horribly. I would not recommend trying to level an entire floor with it. It should be used sparingly on sections that are dramatically uneven.
Doug
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