Ultrasonic bird repellers

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Jeff The Drunk wrote: ...

_IF_ one were to take a mind, I doubt your Pom would have a chance 'cuz he'd get taken from the rear and his neck/back snapped before ever had a chance to put up a fight.
I think it's highly unlikely they would take it for several reasons, though, the first being there are undoubtedly far more prevalent and familiar targets of somewhat lesser size and one wouldn't like the (I'm guessing) more or less constrained area around a house as an attack site that would make for difficult flight path out. Also, while I don't know for sure, I suspect they're watchful enough and cognizant enough to recognize an obstruction like the leash as being a no-no for a target in general.
They are pretty impressive, granted -- 'til you put one up besides one of the golden eagles, anyway... :)
I _HATE_ the da-d kites, though...them bastards dive bomb ya' from the rear just walking across the yard while nesting (which seems to take all summer)... :(
--
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We have the Red Tailed Hawks and Cooper's Hawks and small animals of any kind are in danger. Neighbours of ours used to raise dogs and had to have mesh over the area to keep the hawks out.
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On Mon, 24 May 2010 09:54:13 -0500, dpb wrote:

That's odd. Or is mine odd? Either way I was told and always believed that a big Owl would scare smaller birds.

Must be plenty of Owl food. Watched a documentary on birds where certain Pelicans have started to scoop up the young of a smaller ground nesting aquatic bird. The behavior was blamed on a reduction of the Pelican's normal food source and had never been witnessed before.
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Jeff The Drunk wrote: ...

Out in the open along towards dusk time I'm sure they do--but owls are nocturnal and generally move in daytime only to avoid being themselves disturbed, not to do damage to anything else. Other than that, as far as I can tell having watched them for 50 years or so I don't think they pay any attention to the other at all. I'm quite sure the fake stationary owls have no benefit after the first change in a location for a few days at most for most birds, anyway. An active dummy that did something towards dusk that might look threatening, maybe, but other than that, I think not, meself based on my observations.
The horned owls roost in the cedars by day and only begin to rustle about about a half-hour or so before sunset; then just at dusk they'll depart on the night's adventure. They'll be back on one of their favorite roosting spots for disposing of the kill at daybreak (top of the silo is one, a particular power pole is also a popular alternative) and then not long after the sun is well up they'll be gone only to be seen during the day if happen to get too close to where they are that particular day and disturb them.
The barn owls are much more reclusive -- except for the pair currently nesting in the barn, one rarely sees them at all; they do not come out until well after it is really dark and they're back in their nesting sites well before daybreak as well. Only because the loft in the barn is open does it disturb them when go in there. The upper levels of the elevator are only accessed on rare occasions when actually have some need but last year there were at least three different pairs raising owlets I saw and I don't know how many other pairs might have been back in areas that are not easily seen w/o effort. Once in a while if come home late at night will see the outline of one flit by as the headlights disturb it, but mostly we know they're there by the pellet droppings and sounds they make during the day.
OTOH, horned owls are territorial and only one pair occupies a general area at a time. The young leave after about a year to find their own territories while the barn owls seemingly are pretty convivial and are limited only by nesting sites and food supplies, apparently.
Interestingly also w/ the horned owls, the male and female mate permanently, but do not have any association with each other except starting in the mid-winter roughly courting season and thru nesting. The brood is not all of the same age, either, they are "stairstepped" apart by a couple weeks to month--quite a sight to see three or four in a nest, each a bigger copy of the next younger...
--
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Next questions:
If you walked through the barn with the owl-on-a-pole every time you needed something out of the barn, would the birds in there eventually get used to it and ignore it?
If you permentantly mount the thing, won't they get used to it and ignore it even faster?
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On Mon, 24 May 2010 10:49:41 -0500, AZ Nomad wrote:

Don't know the answers. Next time I speak to an expert on avian behavior I'll be sure to ask.
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I've seen them....with birds sitting on top of them.
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On Tue, 25 May 2010 09:22:55 -0400, Worn Out Retread wrote:

Well if you buy enough of them at least you can control where they roost!
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Worn Out Retread wrote:

If you knew what species the birds were, you might be able to find a recording of their warning cry or the cry of a predator bird to play at regular intervals which might scare them off.
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote: ...

Indeed...many (I think all that showed up in my search for the previous paper abstract that I had seen some years ago) of the ultrasonic products also have such soundtracks w/ them so testimonials to the effectiveness of the ultrasonic devices probably have absolutely nothing to do w/ the ultrasound component do anything except adding to the marketing hype... :)
I'm not sure how effective such are, either, long term. And, of course, there's the nuisance factor of the cure as well as the actual problem in that route.
Starlings, for example, are terribly persistent about roosting--scare them up at eventide and they'll simply circle and return unless are extremely persistent and often even then a large number will eventually just ignore noise, movement, etc., once dark sets in.
--
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You have a handle on the problem that we face. We have been on the look out for nests in the tree and there are none but if I find any in the future they will be gone in a hurry.
All I can do it seems is to hope that they move on to some other unfortunate's property.
Thanks to all for some useful information.
Ron P
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dpb wrote:

You could always strap a concrete vibrator to the tree and put it on a timer. Rattle their little beaks every now and then.
TDD
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On Mon, 24 May 2010 11:04:44 -0500, The Daring Dufas wrote:

We lived next to a farmer who grew popcorn and sweet corn. He had a couple propane cannons that would fire every couple minutes that ran off a gas grill tank. Kept the Starlings out of the fields. We used to shoot them out of the air with a .22.
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There are quite a few species involved unfortunately........I wish that the local hawk population would discover the smorgasbord available here.
Ron P
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Forget ultrasound.
Turn on a loud shop vac. Once they get used to that, use the shop vac noise to mask the sound of you plunking the birds (starlings?) with a nice pellet rifle. No one will hear a thing over the vac.
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Worn Out Retread wrote:

Don't know about ultrasonic, but supersonic things (like a .22 bullet) will work.
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Some people, like me, are sensitive to those frequencies. They cause my ears to ring and hurt like hell.
I'd hate to be your neighbor if you were to put those damned things up.
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wrote:

You can hear Ultra sound?? That is supposed to be beyond the limits of human hearing.
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The full frequency range of what each person can hear varies slightly.
In Europe, I believe, they sell these things to specifically drive off young people from loitering and causing a nuicance. It's based on the general fact that adults lose most of the hearing sensetivity that they had in their youth, so it's supposed to irritate kids while having no effect on adults.
I'm glad they don't do that here.
Either I'm just lucky, or I've been successful in my effors to protect my hearing over the years by wearing earplugs religiously any time I use noisey equipment.
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On Wed, 26 May 2010 03:29:19 +0000 (UTC), ShadowTek

I thought that was called Beetoven.

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