TURN OFF AIR CONDITIONING POWER

Anyone care to comment on this information I receive by email from "managemyhome.com". I have two questions:
1) Should one only "Don't go to the trouble of covering the outdoor component of your air conditioner for the winter. If you wrap it in plastic you can do more harm than good, trapping moisture under the cover. If your unit has a large opening in the top of it, you could cover the top with a piece of plywood held down with a few bricks to keep the snow out." ... Should one only cover the top of the outside unit with plywood?
2) Should I shut the power off during the winter? It sounds like it is a smart thing to do.
3) Any comments / suggestions / advice / tips?
Howie Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
See the info below that I cut and pasted from the email:
TURN OFF AIR CONDITIONING POWER
While we hate to admit it, summer is gone. It's time to shut off your air conditioner for the winter. There's more to it than just flicking the little switch on the thermostat from "cool" to "heat." ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
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WHAT ? Shut off your air conditioner for the winter.
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Howie wrote:

The two tips are both correct. You may want to cover the top of the A/C but leave the sides open.
Yes, turn off the power to the A/C. Just remember to turn the power back on at least 24 hours before trying to run the A/C in the spring.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Opinions are like belly-buttons, no two are alike.

plastic
If you do cover it, you'll have to remember to uncover it in the spring.

I wouldn't. With some people's luck, they will forget to turn the power back on until the house is in the 90 range. Then it's a day (at least) until they can use it. The power consumption may cost you a dollar or two for the entire winter.

Keep grass and weeds away from the condenser. Make sure there is at least 18" clearance from bushes, lattice, or what ever you use to hide the outside unit. While I'm at it, change your air filter!
I am in the South, so AC is required. It don't snow here. I never cover my condenser and leave the power on year 'round.
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I was told years ago to never turn off the "warm-up" power to the outside unit---that it would keep the seals, etc in good shape. I can't say how well it worked, but I just replaced the 31 year old system with a new 16 seer system. System never failed, and still cooled when I had it carted off. I will agree that the power use for that purpose is minimal YMMV
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Most (not all) outdoor condensers (air conditioners) have a compressor crankcase heater that should be left on. It's job (keeping the compressor warm) will prevent liquid refrigerant from 'migrating' to the compressor and mixing with the compressor oil. The heater (residential) uses about 22 watts of power and has minimal cost. If you start the unit without the heater have been on at least 24 hours MAY damage the compressor from refrigerant migration.
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Zyp
"royroy" < snipped-for-privacy@exis.net> wrote in message
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and
I believe that the current situation with the heaters is that "Some Do, and Some Don't.'
My present heat pump doesn't have the heater (Ruud) and the unit it replaced (Lennox) didn't either.
I suggest that reason the companies "don't bother" is because there a plenty of situation where the unit would have to start without the benefit of 24 hours of heater power. One example would be re-staring after a power failure when no one is "at home." Failures would still be covered so the makers would have an incentive to make the design function without the need for the heater being powered 24/7.
BTW: the "customer" handout my HVAC gave me DID say to leave the machine powered on for 24 hours before placing a heating or cooling demand. When my HVAC guy said there was no heater, I just tossed the instructions.
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Hi John, hope you are having a nice day
On 27-Oct-04 At About 21:12:46, John Gilmer wrote to All Subject: Re: TURN OFF AIR CONDITIONING POWER
JG> My present heat pump doesn't have the heater (Ruud) and the unit it JG> replaced (Lennox) didn't either.
If it is a heat pump the heater is there. it could be a well type or a band type. some even use the windings as a heater.
-=> HvacTech2 <=-
.. "A friend of mine is in jail for counterfeiting pennies..."- s.w.
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This is Turtle.
1) Yes 2) Yes 3) Make sure to uncover it and turn the power back on 24 hours before you start using it.
TURTLE
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