Transporting 20 gallons of gas in your trunk and storing in your back yard in the open air question

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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

You'd be surprised how far you can jump when the boat's on fire.
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wrote:

Yeah, a middle aged couple jumping 30 feet and breaking bones landing in water would be a bit of a surprise.
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wrote Re Re: Transporting 20 gallons of

-1 on that.
It's been PROVEN time and again that those "gasoline explosions" you see in movies are not realistic. They are staged using pyrotechnics.
The expose of Dateline NBC's "expose" of the 73-87 GM truck tanks is a classic example.
In a collision that breaches the fuel tank, the fuel dribbles out on the ground and nothing happens. The fumes are too concentrated to ignite, and they quickly dissipate to where there aren't enough fumes to ignite.
reply: Well, folks, that's it. mkirsch1 has said it, so it must be so. There has never been, nor will there ever be an accident where gasoline being transported has ignited during a crash.
In case you did not read the post, I was not talking about pyrotechnic gasoline explosions, but the ignition of gasoline vapors during a vehicle crash.
But, like you said, that never, ever, happens.
Steve
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mdouche1 has his head up his ass!
Gasoline is one of the most explosive flammables around. It will ignite easily, it will explode violently. Hence, its overwhelming popularity as the fuel of choice in internal combustion engines. NOTHING does it better! (well, nitro ;)
As for you, Steve, you need to enable text quoting in your IE newsreader thingie. Douche1's text appears the same as your text and is quite confusing. Not sure how that's done, but I think it's just a radio or check box in options/preferences or whatever IE calls it. ;)
nb
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1 ounce of gasoline vapor = 1 pound of dynamite
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I've never seen a direct equivalency, but as an ex-fireman, I'm well aware of it's potency. The number of ppl who've died or suffered horrible burns using gasoline as a cleaning solvent are legion. Bad mojo, indeed.
nb
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I've often seen it expressed as 1 ounce of gasoline vapor = 20 sticks of dynamite, as well. I believe for gaoline to "explode" by technical specifications, it must be compressed vapor.
If the gasoline vapor is not confined and/or compressed, it creates a fireball, but probably not an explosion. To the person in close proximity, that probably won't make much difference. They will be in deep trouble.
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On 7/21/2010 11:54 AM, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

even compressed in a perfect mixture (ie gasoline engine) it STILL does not explode. It is, however, a rapid burning action.
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Steve Barker
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Aren't all explosions?
nb
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wrote:

While probably not strickly correct, there are high and low explosives. The high explosives material go off almost all at once such as the C4. The low explosives burn very fast, such as black powder.
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Strictly put, there are a lot of terms regarding "explosions".
You refer to explosive materials, such as C4. Explosives are rated at feet per second. C4, IIRC is somewhere around 26,400 fps, which means that if you put 26,400 feet of it out there, it takes one second to go from one end to the other. It is not sensitive to impact or friction. And technically, it does not explode, rather detonates is the proper term. Black powder is much much slower, as we have seen the black powder trail to the dynamite or keg of powder as in the movies. (Black powder may or may not detonate dynamite, depending on the stability of the dynamite.) It's just a fast walking speed. C4 detonates at hypersonic speed, producing a much greater shock wave than black powder, which essentially burns, but rapidly and causes pressure within a confined space which usually powers a projectile out an opening. Black powder can also be used for fracturing rock if it is packed. Loose black powder will just make a lot of smoke.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunpowder http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C-4_(explosive)
Then you get into vapor explosions, which are rapid combustion, and not actually an explosion, as another knowledgeable poster pointed out.
Then there are BLEVE's, or boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion, which is called an explosion, but it is just still another rapid combustion, but these usually occur within vessels that keep the pressure in until something lets go.
IIRC, there is a speed of burn where it technically becomes an "explosion" and not a conflagration (uncontrollable burning) or rapid combustion. And then there's "brisance" which is the rapidity at which it reaches it's maximum speed or shattering ability, usually measured in feet per second.
It gets real technical. For some good youtube, google Seoul BLEVE. There's a good one, IIRC, somewhere in Kansas where a rail car is blown a quarter mile.
In common language, an explosion is anything that goes boom. In technical talk, there are all sorts of levels of boom.
Conflagration would best describe the sparking off of twenty gallons of gas.
Steve
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Or flame. We used to use pieces- 1/4 golf ball size?- to heat C-rations. It has been a *very* long time- but if I remember right a chunk would burn for 1/2 minute or so and boil a can of beans and franks. [too hot for the spaghetti & meatballs]

I never understood exactly what a detonator did -- but they scared the crap out of me. C4 was silly putty that burned.
-snip-

I note that the Wiki page says C4 will explode if stomped on while burning. That was 'common knowledge' in 1969 when I was a foolish lad of 18. We tried to detonate it by stomping & by throwing large rocks on it while burning. I never saw anything but a blasting cap detonate C4.
-snip-

What would be the term for the 'whoosh' of the vapors that can lift buildings off their foundations?
Gas is pretty safe-- it's the vapors that kill you.
Jim
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Jim Elbrecht wrote:

Yep, doodlebuggers (oil exploration crew members) often rammed a stick of dynamite in the ground, lit the end, and made coffee. The stuff burns like a railroad flare, though not as violently (or smelly).
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wrote

C4 does emit a poisonous gas when burned, but hey, you're in country, and there's VC within smelling distance, what's a little poisonous gas? Might even get an early discharge. From the Army, that is.
Steve
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-snip-

Smell, hell! Mr. Charles could see us plain as day. We were on an OP about 400 feet above the surrounding rice paddies. He might have been somewhat deterred from taking us on regularly due to our 106 Recoilless rifle. OTOH, as I learned 30 years later, the NVA hospital within the mountain might have made us a 'quiet zone'.<g>
Not my site- but here's a photo- http://home.earthlink.net/~2551/id20.html
'My' mountain is the bigger one in the top picture- the Marines called it Crowsnest. We even had a shower up there- made from an orange 55 gallon drum. [another surprise 30 yrs after the fact- I had never connected the orange barrel with Agent Orange- but our corpsman confirms that what it was]

Army couldn't discharge us- we're Marines.<g>
Jim
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If you're going to get nitpicky, I will too. A BLEVE is a mechanical explosion; it does not require combustion at all. Water can BLEVE in the right container, as the Mythbusters have proven.
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wrote:

If you're going to get nitpicky, I will too. A BLEVE is a mechanical explosion; it does not require combustion at all. Water can BLEVE in the right container, as the Mythbusters have proven.
reply: I'm sorry, but you were the one picking nits and not being very specific about it, either.
I'm sorry if I confused you with specific terms.
Steve
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You didn't confuse me with specific terms.
You confused me by stating that a BLEVE is rapid combustion.
I have always believed a BLEVE does not require combustion.
The wiki article I just googled confirms my belief.
Obviously you do not agree, so perhaps you would explain why.
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wrote:

You didn't confuse me with specific terms.
You confused me by stating that a BLEVE is rapid combustion.
I have always believed a BLEVE does not require combustion.
The wiki article I just googled confirms my belief.
Obviously you do not agree, so perhaps you would explain why.
reply: Uh, because you say one thing, and I say another?
A bleve that causes a sizeable fireball is usually caused by containment of some sort. Opened topped gas storage tanks have caught fire and caused similar situations, but there was no confinement of gas to increase the pressure. Since the last word in bleve stands for explosion, would it just be a bunch of boiling gas if it were not lit in some way? Isn't that combustion?
Steve
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On 7/21/2010 8:15 PM, notbob wrote:

no, there's actually a difference.
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Steve Barker
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