Transporting 20 gallons of gas in your trunk and storing in your back yard in the open air question

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I have a typical back yard, open mostly to the sun, where I store five 5-gallon jerry jugs of gasoline for my bikes and equipment and off-road vehicles.
I don't see that it's all that much of a danger, considering we keep two cars in the garage with twice that much gasoline essentially inside the house - while this is outside along the fence.
But, my neighbor noticed the four jugs recently and asked about them. I said I never knew gas to spontaneously explode and he said the sun could cause it to happen. He also said it's illegal to transport more than a single five-gallon can in your trunk (is that true?).
Is it all that dangerous to keep 20 gallons of gas in the back yard? Is it illegal to trasnsport more than 5 gallons (California) in a car?
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On 7/20/2010 8:34 PM, Bill Murphy wrote:

It's a local thing:
http://cbs4.com/hurricanepreps/gasoline.consumer.generators.2.394472.html
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On Tue, 20 Jul 2010 21:06:10 -0400, Frank wrote:

CARB (California Air Resource Board) states http://www.pfcma.com/States_Compliance.htm
CARB/OTC Portable Fuel Container & Spout Regulation Updated Apr 2008
State: Transition Date: Full Compliance Date California     Jan-01-00     Jan-01-01 Phase II regulation: Jul-01-07 Delaware     Jan-01-02     Jan-01-03 Maryland     Jan-01-02     Jan-01-03 New York     Jan-01-02     Jan-01-03 Pennsylvania     Jan-01-02     Jan-01-03 Maine     Jan-01-03     Jan-01-04 Virginia Jan-01-05 (specific counties only) Connecticut     May-01-04     May-01-05 Washington DC    Jan-01-05     Jan-01-06 New Jersey     Jan-01-05     Jan-01-06 Texas     Jan-01-06 New Hampshire     Mar-01-06     Mar-01-07 Ohio     Jul-01-07 Massachusetts     Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection is awaiting implementation of the U.S. EPA nation-wide Portable Fuel Container Rules scheduled for January 2009. Rhode Island     Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management is awaiting implementation of the U.S. EPA nation-wide Portable Fuel Container Rules scheduled for January 2009. Vermont     The VT DEC (Dept of Environmental Conservation) is awaiting implementation of the U.S. EPA nation-wide Portable Fuel Container Rules scheduled for January 2009. Illinois     The IEPA is currently awaiting implementation of the U.S. EPA nation-wide Portable Fuel Container Rules scheduled for January 2009. National EPA     Administrator signed proposed rule similar to CARB's revised rules. Implementation date is January 2009
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My concern is with all the fumes. It won't explode from the sun, but it would be better out of the sun. Less fumes and less volitable.
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Less expansion & contraction of the containers if out of the sun. I've seen some plastic jugs which looked like they'd been squeezed by giant hands when the temp went down.
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Storing gasoline and other highly flammable liquids at home is also dangerous if not done properly. The best way to store gasoline is in a well ventilated area separate from the house. The location should have no electrical equipment, open flames or other sources of ignition present. In addition, the location should be protected from the heat of the summer sun to keep evaporation to a minimum.
http://nasdonline.org/document/919/d000760/storing-gasoline-and-other-flammables.html
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On 7/20/2010 2:34 PM, Bill Murphy wrote:

Buy an old Caddie or two, fill up the tanks and park it in your back yard along with your bikes and off-road vehicles. Tell your nosy neighbor to mind his own business.
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On Tue, 20 Jul 2010 15:48:27 -1000, dsi1 wrote:

In theory, one could remove the 20-gallon gas tank from an automobile junker, and, assuming all the hoses and caps are intact, store 20 gallons in the single gas tank unobtrusively along that fence.
Pouring it out would be by adding 12 volts to the fuel pump, I guess.
But I'd wonder about the legality of storing gas in a gas tank. Seems like that's what it's made for, but, maybe not legal outside the vehicle.
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On 7/20/2010 4:10 PM, Elmo wrote:

How about converting a small car or a golf cart into a small tanker by replacing the rear seat/trunk area with a gas tank? A hundred gallons ought to do the trick. As far as the legality of it all, it's probably best not to ask such things. We want the option of plausible deniability. :-)
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Bill Murphy wrote:

I'd be more concerned about the buttinsky neighbor than the gasoline.
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On 7/20/2010 8:52 PM, HeyBub wrote:

amen. tell him to myob
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
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== Bullshit...the neighbor has legitimate concerns. 20 gallons of gasoline in jerry cans stored in a trunk of a car is NOT safe. If stored in a locked garden shed isolated from all buildings or fences it would be much safer but not ideal. Residential areas are not designed for the storage of volatile liquids especially in the quantities mentioned. I would not store more than 2 gallons at the most...this would be adequate for lawnmower and weedeater usage. People who do what THEY want and disregard OTHERS are just selfish jerks. I have lived next to these kinds of people in the past and believe me, it is no picnic. ==
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<snip>

My gas mowers, edger's, generator, and so on probably hold more than 30 gallons. I normally keep 15 to 25 gallons on hand all the time to feed all of those small engines. Most of my gas engines have 2 to 5 gallon gas tanks.
--
Jim Rusling
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== An acreage or small farm will naturally require more maintenance and of course more gasoline or diesel. I have a 300 gallon gas tank but the average city lot isn't that large that such reserves are required. Close neighbors have to be in the equation. ==
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On Wed, 21 Jul 2010 18:47:29 -0700 (PDT), Roy wrote:

Transportation of Hazardous Materials - Recent Laws & Regulations
HM-200; TITLE:"Hazardous Materials in Intrastate Commerce; Technical Amendments"; Final Rule; Effective Date 02/18/98; Published 02/18/98; 63 FR 8140.
SUMMARY: On January 8, 1997, RSPA published a final rule which amended the Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to expand the scope of the regulations to all intrastate transportation of hazardous materials. ... In this final rule, RSPA is: Correcting a date for States to develop legislation authorizing certain exceptions recognized in the HMR; clarifying packaging requirements for hazardous materials transported for agricultural operations; correcting size requirements for identification number markings; and clarifying that the provisions for use of non-specification cargo tanks apply to transportation of gasoline.
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wrote:

Absolutely. AFA the neighbor and I know, these could blow up and send shrapnel all over his yard. If that's possible, the OP should know it too, and if it's not, the OP shoould be able to relay this info to the neighbor. He'd be a fool not to raise the subject.

But those are are all little, separate tanks, vented gas tanks. If one goes, it won't take the others with it (except in action movies).
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wrote:

=Bullshit...the neighbor has legitimate concerns. 20 gallons of gasoline in jerry cans stored in a trunk of a car is NOT safe. If stored in a locked garden shed isolated from all buildings or fences it would be much safer but not ideal. Residential areas are not designed for the storage of volatile liquids especially in the quantities mentioned. I would not store more than 2 gallons at the most...this would be adequate for lawnmower and weedeater usage. People who do what THEY want and disregard OTHERS are just selfish jerks. I have lived next to these kinds of people in the past and believe me, it is no picnic. = I second the neighbor has legitimate concerns. He's doing his neighbor a solid by telling him it maybe illegal and dangerous. If the OP's house burned down the group would be saying "Why didn't the neighbor say something?" <g>
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On Thu, 22 Jul 2010 15:40:52 -0500, JimT wrote:

At this point, I just want to find out what the law says about storage and transportation of 5-gallon gasoline containers.
So far, nobody can come up with a California law. NY law was interesting though. So a Ca law probably exists (hell, in California, you can't even put a GPS on the windshield).
We just can't find any California law regarding either storage of 5-gallon cans of gasoline or transportation of 5-gallon portable containers filled with gasoline.
BTW, 2 gallons is ridiculously small. I use a 2-gallon can just for the two-stroke equipment, let alone the four-stroke equipment and the off-road bikes and the riding mower and the generator. Two gallons would last less than a few hours, being so ridiculously small as to not be feasible.
So far, the law seems to start at 120 gallons, which is way above the practical minimum. I'd guess the practicable minimum for an average homeowner to be at least 5 gallons (assuming only minor lawn equipment).
You always need an absolute minimum of two cans, one for the two strokes, and one for the four stroke engines.
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For the record that was "mm" that wrote that. I have more than 2 gal on site. 2 for my lawn mower and maybe a gal for the edger. I was just commenting that it "sounds" like your neighbor is just concerned. <g> I haven't said a word to one of my neighbors in about 3 years, but he's a butthole.
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On 7/22/2010 1:50 PM, Bill Murphy wrote:

You should contact your local planning department with regards to storage. They are the best place to start. Another good place is your local fire department since it involves hazardous material storage.
As far as transportation, I did find this
"It is ILLEGAL to transport more than 15 gallons or 125 pounds of hazardous waste in your personal vehicle."
I suspect 15 gallons of gasoline is the maximum not counting the vehicle fuel tank.
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