"transformer" for 220v to 110 outlet.

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I have a space in my garage near my washer and dryer where I would like to place a treadmill. It is a '70's house with basement on one circuit. Am afraid running washer/dryer and treadmill will blow circuit breaker.
Dryer is Gas, but there is a 220v plug right there, and would neccesarilly be on a seperate circuit (right??) Is there some sort of transformer plug type thing that I can plug into 220 v circuit plug, then plug 110v treadmill into that circuit.
I don't want to start running new circuits, which of course would be the correct answer here, just looking for a safe temporary solution.
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I don't know if this is legal or not but I just took one leg off oo the 220 and ran it to a 110 outlet. It doesn't have a ground of course.
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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It probably *does* have a ground, and does *not* have a neutral. This is dangerous, and a good example of why people who "don't know if this is legal or not" should not attempt their own electrical projects.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If done to code, yes.

If your 220v outlet is an older style and only has two hot wires and a ground (usually red, black, and bare/green) you can't create a 110v circuit from it. If your outlet has 2 hot wires (usually red, black), a neutral (white), and a ground (bare/green), you can get 110v from either of the hot wires (black or red) to neutral (white). I'd suggest mounting a new outlet box adjacent to the current box with a 110v duplex outlet, wired as above. BE SURE TO LOCATE AND TURN OFF THE RIGHT CIRCUIT BREAKER BEFORE YOU START.
If you don't completely understand this advice and the risks associated with working on house circuits, don't attempt it.
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Travis Jordan wrote:

I should have also mentioned that in order to be safe you should insure that the existing 220v circuit breakers do not exceed the rating of the new outlet - i.e. 15 or 20 amps, depending on what type of 110V outlet you use.
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above over my head, am looking for something I can plug into 220... with a couple of holes on the other side where I can plug in the 110v. If that does not exist I am not going to try to jimmy anything up, I am not qualified to mess with any wires.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It is good to know one's limitations. My congratulations to you.. and stay safe.
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"I don't know if this is legal or not but I just took one leg off oo the 220 and ran it to a 110 outlet. It doesn't have a ground of course. "
Do everyone a favor and stop hacking around with what you don't understand, before you kill someone.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Good call...best bet is to plug into the 110 duplex outlet for the washer and if it trips the breaker to use both together, then just don't do that... :)
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Wise of you to reach that conclusion, Jack.
If that dryer outlet has four slots in it it *should* have a neutral wire connected to it, in which case a competent person could verify the presense and size of that neutral lead and then easily make you an adaptor out of a dryer "pigtail cord" a surface mount box with an outlet cover, a cable clamp and a duplex outlet.
HTH,
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

110v.
Around here at the big-box places I see adapter plugs that plug into a 220 *range* socket and give you a grounded 120 V socket. They are meant for people converting to gas stoves from electric. They do seem to bear the certification authorities' logos, to my mild surprise.
Dryer plugs are slightly different (neutral blade is L-shaped) and I haven't noticed such a device for them, but I haven't looked.
For sure you'd want to have a four-prong circuit (separate ground and neutral) to make anything of it.
Chip C
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On 28 Feb 2005 09:04:39 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

In that case, I recommend a heavy-duty extension cord. Get your power from somewhere else.
You COULD get a transformer to go from 220-110, but that would be just stupidly expensive.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If I recall correctly, there is a rule in the NEC that says a 120V outlet can be installed on the 240V feed for use when the dryer has both 120V and 240V plugs.... so you might be able to get an electrician in there to install the "120V" plug without "running a new circuit". I'm probably missing some nuance of the rule though.
A 240 line is usually the neutral and the two hot phases of the 120V service in the residential home. (sometimes they have ground as well)
If *I* needed a temporary 120V feed, I'd get a 240V (dryer) cord, run it into a outlet box, cap one of the hot feeds, and wire up the second hot/neutral to an outlet. I'd really want to put some sort of ground on the device if possible, or use a gfci outlet if ground wasn't available. Then I would plug in only when using the feed. This would probably break all sorts of rules in the NEC though... so I wouldn't recommend it for someone else.
I can't tell you what to do...I'm not a licensed electrician, and I don't know what's going on at your house/box, nor do I know your skill level.
Good luck in any case.
--
be safe.
flip
Ich habe keine Ahnung was das bedeutet, oder vielleicht doch?
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Not correct. A 240V circuit is usually the *ground* and the two hot legs of the *240V* service in the home. Sometimes they have *neutral* as well.
240V circuits that do not need to supply 120V loads (a water heater supply is an example of such a circuit) generally do *not* have a neutral, because they don't need it.
Normally, the neutral is present *only* in 240V circuits that need to supply 120V loads as well, e.g. an electric oven (heating elements are 240V, timer and light are 120V), or an electric dryer (heating elements are 240V, motor probably 120V, timer definitely 120V) -- and only then if the circuit was wired fairly recently. Code *used* to permit using the grounding conductor as the neutral, which isn't really especially safe. It's no longer allowed, but there are a *lot* of dryer and range circuits in existence that don't have a neutral conductor.

And by doing so, you'd probably create a dangerous condition, because that 240V circuit probably doesn't have a neutral, and you'd be using the equipment grounding conductor as the neutral.

If *I* were doing that, I'd make sure I had a neutral first. I'd also make sure I understood the Code, and *why* it disallows some practices.

I can tell. You should not be giving out electrical advice, until you understand the difference between neutral and ground, and how 240V circuits are configured.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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If you're going to be opening up boxes, why not just move one of the two hots to the nuetral-bus in the service panel, tag it at both ends, and replace the receptical and breaker?
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) writes:

And that would be the nuance of the rule that i mentioned i might have missed. I was thinking of the stove outlets. Thank you for clearing up the misunderstanding. (btw i also said the electrician might be able to install a plug when i meant to say outlet.)

If i were going to do it, I would likely have seen the condition... which is why i said for him to call an electrician to see about it. I also would use a circuit tester... though i don't think it can tell a ground from a neutral, they should be electrical neutral to each other and should be connected in the circuit panel... or is that another nuance i've missed? (My guess is that assuming i thought the other non hot wire was a neutral, and if i wired the receptacle using that assumption that it would show an open ground which is what i would be expecting)

I'm not... (aside from telling him that i thought there was an "easy" option that he should talk to an electrician about)... i thought I made that clear... Perhaps not.

and probably not even then. :)
A neutral conducts electricity in normal operation, A ground conducts only in some fault state. At least that is my understanding of the situation... but hey, you've shown my memory to be faulty... so i'm not guaranteeing anything.
--
be safe.
flip
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When someone asks "how do you do this?" and you tell him "this is how I would do it" that *is* giving advice.

That's correct as far as it goes, but it's not the whole story. In particular you don't seem aware that while 240V circuits nearly always have *grounds*, they frequently do *not* have neutrals -- and that's what makes your advice to the OP not only wrong, but also dangerous. Hence my statement that you should not be giving out electrical advice.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) writes:

If someone asked how to change the behavior of a program, and i say that "most programs can be changed in the source code" and that "they should find a programmer" to do it.
Then I say that *I* would take the source code, modify it, and recompile because i have had some programming experience. That does not mean i think *they* should re-code it, nor does it make them a programmer.
I did not cover the case of "If i went to the source and saw that it was written in the language "Forth" (which i don't know) I wouldn't do it.
My "advice" was that i *think* it can be done easily, and they should call someone who is familiar with it.

I did not ever say to connect a hot and ground to supply power. I specifically said I would connect a neutral and hot together, and that i would want to have a ground at the location as well. That choice of wording specifically would seem to indicate that there was a difference between the two, and that just perhaps, I knew the difference between the two. Which is why I made it very clear that I don't recommend they do what I said i would do.
In my original post, i see that i did screw up and say that there is usually a neutral and sometimes a ground... My thought patterent went: "I recall there are places when you can legally install a 120V circuit which requires a neutral, so there must be a neutral in there." I focused on the exception and generalized it. I screwed up. (and i admited so in the first reply). Sorry.
Out of curiosity, If there is an unmarked white insulated wire in an outlet, other than tracing it back to the circuit panel, is there a way differentiate between neutral and ground? (Let's assume that it wasn't hooked to a box ground lug and that we have no idea if it's wired to code.)
In any case, we're mostly talking semantics and interpretation now... which isn't helping this guy get his treadmill plugged in.
--
be safe.
flip
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[snip irrelevant word games]

No, that's *not* what you wrote. This is:
"If *I* needed a temporary 120V feed, I'd get a 240V (dryer) cord, run it into a outlet box, cap one of the hot feeds, and wire up the second hot/neutral to an outlet. I'd really want to put some sort of ground on the device if possible, or use a gfci outlet if ground wasn't available. Then I would plug in only when using the feed. This would probably break all sorts of rules in the NEC though... so I wouldn't recommend it for someone else."
Like I said... if someone asks how to do something, and you say "this is how I'd do it" that *is* giving advice.

Refer to your advice above: "cap one of the hot feeds, and wire up the second hot/neutral to an outlet." Problem is, there is NO NEUTRAL in a typical 240V circuit. The OP obviously doesn't understand 240V circuits any better than you do, and by following your advice he may well use the bare wire, thinking it's the "neutral" that you're talking about.

You also wrote: "A 240 line is usually the neutral and the two hot phases of the 120V service in the residential home. (sometimes they have ground as well)"
and this seems to indicate that you don't understand the difference between ground and neutral, at least with respect to 240V circuits.

That's exactly what I've been telling you. Glad you finally noticed.
[...]

Hook an ammeter to it, and apply a load to the circuit. If the ammeter shows current flowing, it's either hot or neutral. If the ammeter shows no current, either it's ground, or it's not connected to that circuit.

No, we're *not* talking semantics and interpretation. We're talking the difference between safe and unsafe practice.

-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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I have an idea - hook a wire from the treadmill to the dryer. Then run real hard - and you can power the dryer by running. I saw this on ESPN - Lance Armstrong had a bike hooked up to the ESPN transmitter. When he stopped pedaling the TV program went black :-)
Harry
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