Towel rod project

Hi,
I am going to try one of the suggestions here about putting up a sheet of wood over the sheetrock and then installing our towel rods into the wood.
So I am going to need a stud finder to locate the studs and some thin nails to test and make sure I find the studs correctly. I've never used a stud finder so any tips would be appreciated.
Once I locate the studs I can attach my strips of wood using screws or I guess I could nail them in. Screws seems like a good way to go. Once the strips of wood are up I will attach the towel rods.
Seems simple enough but then again I've never used a stud finder.
I decided on using the sheet of wood because the wall paper in this room is fairly new but it is ripped now where the rods pulled off the wall. The wood will cover up the tears and hopefully they won't pull out of the wall once I get them mounted using this method.
I'd appreciate any tips before I get started on this one.
Thanks, Steve
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You can tap on the wall to find the studs by sound, or use a magnet to find the nails holding the drywall to them, and thereby, the studs. I've got a magnet removed from a hard drrive that will stick itself firmly to the drywall nails.
Bob
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Stud finders are easy to use, follow the instructions, then mark wall with erasable pencil. Erase marks later with a soft white polymer eraser, to minimize wallpaper damage. Get the finders with led lights (locates wood), not the magnetic (locates nails only) kind.I then double check before drilling, using very thin nails, pushed thru the sheetrock using a Vice Grips to hold the nail. In other words check twice, drill once..... Much simpler just to forget the mounting board, and cut the bar length to fit the stud spacing, once you have double checked stud positions. Maybe you can cut patches from spare wallpaper and paste them on, usually with good effect if you line up the pattern right.
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Just follow the instructions. You run it on the wall and watch the lights.

Screws are better because you can remove them easier if need be later.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Hi, Counter sink screw. Why not just mount rod onto studs? Tony
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I'm not sure if the stud size matches the towel rod. I'll check that out before I use the strip of wood.
Thanks, Steve
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out before I use the strip of wood.
If it doesn't match, I would think that you could cut the towel rod. Exactly how were you going to finish the piece of wood to make it look nice? Sounds tacky.
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scott snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com writes:

Agreed. And if not long enough then you may be able to buy longer rod. I cannot imagine doing something so kludgey in my own living space.
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writes:

They sell decorative mounting plates for this very situation, in the more boutique type plumbing supply houses. Not uncommon for bathrooms with wallpaper, which doesn't handle towel rub and moisture well. Most wooden towel racks (remember when oak bathroom trim/accessories were popular for 15 minutes?) come with a mounting plate. If there is any Real Wood trim or cabinetry in bathroom, a plate of same material, with suitable edge detail, looks fine.
aem sends...
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Hi, Buy longer one than what you need and cut it to line up with studs. Tony
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You don't need no stinking stud finder, hombre. Tap on the wall with your knuckles and listen for the change in sound. Drive in a small (4d) nail a see if the stud is there. Since you are planning on covering the area with a board you won't see these test holes. You had better plan on using a marine grade spar varnish as a top coat and even at that you can expect discoloration of the wood in a couple of years. Wood is a poor choice for wet towels. How do I know? Cosmic consciousness. Yea that's it. Cosmic consciousness. Wait. One more message coming... oak will turn black. That's it. Channel closed.

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Stud finders aren't always accurate without experience. "Find" the studs several times before you decide where they are.
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