Toshiba tv troubleshoot

I have a large flat screen Toshiba, about six or seven years old. It just goes off by itself while I'm watching it. I need to dig for the instructions, and see maybe if there is a sleep timer set on it for turning it off for inactivity. Lately, I notice that it goes off sooner.
It is one of the three bulb rear projection screen models. Last time, I heard that dust in the unit could cause overheating, so tomorrow, I will take the covers off and blow it out with compressed air.
Is this a common thing with you Toshiba owners? Does it indicate overheating because of dust, or maybe it needs new bulbs? I'll dig for the instructions tomorrow, but would appreciate any input you might have in the meantime.
Steve
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wrote:

It may very well be a component overheating. I've had similar problems with other TVs.
Chances are, the cost of repair is going to be half the cost of a new TV, a real LED flat screen with a much better quality picture.
I know two people with those old projector TVs and both upgraded when the heard the cost of repairs.
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Try avsforum.com. There are dedicated threads for Toshiba owners. If you do a search there you might find your answer.
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Steve B wrote:

There are bad electrolytic capacitors inside your TV.
http://www.bridgat.com/files/offer_Aluminum_Electrolytic_Capacitor.jpg
A capacitor plant in China made a lot of bad capacitors about 7 years ago. MANY consumer electronic devices (TV's, computer motherboards, Digital TV convertor boxes, etc) have stopped working because these capacitors failed.
It's fairly easy to repair the problem - just unsolder the caps from the circuit board and replace with a new cap. You can buy new caps for less then $1 each. Your TV probably has only 4 to 6 of these that have gone bad - probably in the power supply circuit.
Look at the top of these caps for cracks or a split where a tan-colored pasty substance has oozed out. Sometimes there will be nothing oozing out, but the top of the capacitor will have a slight upwards buldge.
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TV Repairman wrote:

Hi, Likewise, I just fixed kid's 21" LCD monitor by replacing 4 caps in power supply circuit. Symptom was it turns on and goes off in few minutes over and over. Cost was just time spent. I had some caps in my hell box. Other than working voltag, cap. value does not have to be exact match.
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On Wed, 22 Aug 2012 09:05:08 -0600, Tony Hwang wrote:

Well, too low and you'll start to see problems as the PSU won't be outputting nice clean DC, and if the replacement caps aren't rated for the same temperature band then they might cook themselves pretty quickly. The ones that seem prone to 'capacitor plague' are often low-ESR types, too.
cheers
Jules
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