Tool Score !

Just picked up a Ridgid tile saw at the local outlet store , looks like it might have made just a few cuts . Looks like new , lists for $190 , I got it for $65 ... and just in time . My son has my little 44" tile saw down in Memphis , and I need one to cut cement blocks . This is a 7" and will make my life so much easier than hammer and chisel cuts .
--
Snag



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Terry Coombs wrote:

Damn , that should read 4" tile saw .
--
Snag



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On 11/5/2015 12:48 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

Corrected. Damn, now nothing to razz you about. Hope you don't have any 36" tiles to cut.
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On 11/5/2015 12:48 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

NNo worries, WWe all do that kind of TThing. CCongrats! Well done, sir.
- . CChristopher A. Young learn more about JJesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Thu, 5 Nov 2015 21:33:44 -0500, Stormin Mormon

A couple weeks ago, a freeccycle person was giving away CRT 9" and 12 (or 14)" tvs. So I met her at a shopping center and when she opened the back of her van it was 19", not 9. I felt I had to take it, since she'd lugged it to her car, and since I wanted the 12" one. But it is so very much in the way.

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Congrats! Always nice to save $$$$. ;)
nb
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wrote:

Sounds like a good deal for a tile saw but if you are just cutting blocks for your project, a diamond wheel in a side grinder is better. A block mason just scores them with the edge of the trowel (or a brick hammer) and breaks them. I agree that is a trick. If they are making specialty block, they usually use a gas powered 14" cut off saw.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I have a diamond blade for my angle grinder too ... this saw will also be used for tiling where She wants tile . The whole top course of block will need to be cut to size , this looks to be the best way to get uniformity . The blades that came with it look kinda cheesy so I ordered a spare , but who knows they may work just swell .
--
Snag



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On 11/5/2015 12:17 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

+1 on the good deal. Paid more than that, I think, for the 4" I bought at HF. Another one of those "HF tools that can be quite good AND inexpensive" AFAIK, there's still plenty of life in it after a kitchen and two baths.
I debated using the chisel and hammer on a planter made for SWMBO's raised herb garden. In the end, I just grabbed an old, cheap Skilsaw and chucked diamond blade it. Maybe a 3/8" scoring cut on two adjacent sides and a light tap and I was good to go. Be sure to use a junker saw or lay some cloth to filter the air being sucked in or you'll have a junker when you're through. With mine, I didn't care and let it run without any filtration. Sounds worse now than before but still works.
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I have an old Craftsman circular saw I bought 40 years ago and about 8 years ago it fell off the roof and the blade guard broke off. The part was unavailable but I figured a diamond blade wasn't that dangerous without the guide so I started using it as a masonry saw. I have cut concrete slabs, granite, pavers and a bunch of other stuff. I have worn out 2 diamond blades. It is still going strong. I also cut a bunch of pavers on my old Craftsman table saw, I guess Sears used to make pretty good stuff back in the olden days.
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On Thursday, November 5, 2015 at 6:04:11 PM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Agree...my Craftsman stuff is 45+ yrs old: table saw, circ. saw, dual action sander, and 6" grinder. The newer saber saw and router are not the same quality.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com posted for all of us...

Let's face it-Sears isn't ANYTHING like it was then.
--
Tekkie

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On Thursday, November 5, 2015 at 1:18:11 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

14"? Go 20 or go home. ;-)
http://www.ohiopowertool.com/p-4488-diamond-products-20-gas-gds60-dragon-saw-ring-saw-26567.aspx
I use one for finish trim work. Coping inside corners is a little tricky, but it can be done.
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DerbyDad03 posted for all of us...

AND it's ON SALE!
--
Tekkie

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On 11/5/2015 11:45 AM, Terry Coombs wrote:

A tip for thrifty DIY'ers: if your city or county accepts electrical items for recycling, check to see if their recycling facility has a reuse room open to the public (they often do). They will frequently have power tools and electronic gadgets available for free or dirt cheap.
I have a relative who works at a county recycling facility, and he's got all of us on speed dial. It's amazing the number of tools put out for recycling that were apparently used for just one or two projects, then discarded. And in the fall/winter months the number of perfectly good discarded tvs and audio gear goes way up. A lot of people just recycle their old stuff when they buy themselves new stuff for Christmas (and the Superbowl, too, in the case of televisions).
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wrote:

You know they sell HALF Blocks, right? It's rare to have to cut blocks, since those half ones generally take care of all door and window openings, as long as you use doors and windows based on 8 or16 inch spacing since blocks are 16" long. So you can use a 36" door, leave out 2 1/2 blocks will yield a 40" opening, but the frame will use up most of that. If needed add a little more wood. around the frame.
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snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

Yup , I know they sell half blocks , and lots of other special products that can drive up the cost of a project . Since I'm not driven by time I choose to do it this way and save a few bucks . You're free to do it any way you want on your project .
--
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On Fri, 06 Nov 2015 20:34:19 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moc wrote:

Typically a cube of block will have a number of different styles. There is a stretcher block with the indented ends, they have the plain faced block with one or 2 flat ends and a breaker block that has a bubble in the center web so it is easy to break into 2 8" block. Masons will usually do that with the edge of their trowel. You usually end up sawing specialty block like "U" block (with a U shaped cutout to hold rebar for a bond beam) or header block with a chunk out the side for pouring a slab on the top of a stem wall.
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