Tool advice

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On a more basic note, I found my cordless 14.4 Craftsman drill to work well, but the batteries were dead within a few years, and replacements were almost as expensive as a new drill. In retrospect the corded option was better for me: Always ready, never lacking power or charge, and no big bill a year later for new batteries. Unless you use your cordless equipment regularly, the batteries die long before the tool dies. ( I did remember to discharge completely to try and avoid 'memory'). Be sure to check out how much the replacement batteries cost, as I made a big mistake on Craftsman, with their overpriced batteries. My corded drills still work fine, and my crapsman cordless sits gathering dust.
Dave

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wrote:

That's because yer havin' fun...and yer just not used to it!! lol

Probably.

Not necessarily. You use what you've got...then replace or upgrade when necessary. But you ALSO try to plan ahead...and put some of your personal logic into your purchase.
For instance...
If you know yer gonna finish yer basement soon, you don't buy a 9.6 drill...if you plan on usin' that drill for the basement job, too. You may want to get something heftier...and maybe hammer drill incorporated.
Oh...and here's where the prejudice part comes in...
I just bought a 1/2" 2-gear speed, VSR, hammer drill 18v. I think I paid $26.99...or $29...I forget. What's the first thing you think off when you hear that price?...with those features? See?!! lol
With the way current technology is changin', don't spend too much money on something that you think is gonna last forever. The FEATURES won't last forever! How many contractors do you see usin' a drill on the job that has a keyed chuck?
But...again as I think I hinted at before...I wouldn't buy a tool that is too expensive and overkill for the job at hand. If I buy a drill that costs hundreds of dollars and will generate $100,000 in sales...its money well spent.

Many of the 'cheap' tools have gained in popularity because they were kept around in case the 'name brand' tool failed. And failed they did. They ALL do eventually...I don't care WHAT the quality is.
So the 'cheap' tool got used while the good one was being repaired. Low and behold...the cheap tool was still working when the good one came back. So they kept on usin' the cheap tool.

Common sense...and pocket book...will prevail in most cases. When I bought my first cordless drill, I didn't realize how important a 2-speed gear box is. So now, that's the first thing that I look for.

Cost per billable hour. Or cost per home project(s) hour.
If I'm gonna use a drill for 2 hours total in 10 years, most drills will last for 2 hours of total run time. So the cheaper tool is the better purchase.

Yer welcome. There's been a lot of good feedback for you here.
Good luck.
Have a nice one...
Trent
Budweiser: Helping ugly people have sex since 1876!
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Chicago Electrical is great. I have a couple of their tools, and they do as good a job as my Makita's, plus I don't have to worry about dammaging them or losing them, because I can replace them very easily. I do, however, get the rolling of the eyes when friends see me using a very non-distinct loking tool, while their DeWalt driver is clearly marked "DeWalt". I don't care <smile>.
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On 28 Oct 2004 12:59:47 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (GeoCrunch21) wrote:

DeWalt is the old Black&Decker commercial line. Good stuff. So was the Black&Decker commercial line. The Black&Decker comsumer line lost it's good name due to being associated with irons, coffee pots, etc. Black&Decker bought out DeWalt for the name. DeWalt used to make the best radial arm saw, if you find an old one, you probably ought to buy it. I have a Black&Decker commercial right-angle drill thats great, just like the DeWalt except it's not yellow. Ridgid is the old Craftsman tool line. Not much to do with Ridge Tool Co., its actually made by Emerson, the same people who make Insinkerator, except that they bought the company to have a recognized name. Ridge still makes very good plumbing equipment, the power tools are generally questionable, just as the Craftsman tools were. I wouldn't buy anything from Sears that had a motor on it. Just MHO. Sears sells good underwear and socks, though.
Dan
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The adage "You get what you pay for" couldn't be any more suitable than in this case!!
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This is Turtle.
Look the tools that you have and look at the age and how well they held up. Pick the name of the tools you have that you think held up the best and use that brand. I use to use nothing but the high dollar stuff in my HVAC business but I've come to the conclusion that B & D and Skill run just like the other if you really take care of them. Now I do still use the Porter Cable recept saw for they seem to hold up the best.
TURTLE
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Actually, everything I have is B&D. They were very popular for the home owner/amateur fixer-upper 25 yrs ago ;-) You are the first person to say thet even the cheaper brands will do well if you take good care of them. So, may be I should ust replace the failing tools with the same brand. Hmm... not a bad idea.
Thanks.
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B & D is not the same quality today. I'd pass over them but they may hold up for the occasional user. You won't see any tradesmen using them today.
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wrote in message news:c47a2

That seems to be the trend, in general... I've actually gotten lots of interesting responses, in this newsgroup, which is great. Based on what I've seen so far, I think I'm better off spending a bit more and getting makita(s) or equivalent.
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wrote in message news:c47a2

This is Turtle.
Yes it is always better to have better tools to use and last longer but one thing that I will have every 2 or 3 years and you will have the same old one running and beat up, cord broken, and look like hell. I will have bright shinny new tools every 2 or 3 years and you will have the same old one's that your friends may talk about you having that old stuff and should have new ones. The reason i say this is I have a old Millwalkee recept saw that is about 20 years old and looks like hell and has not a bit of paint on it but runs good. My crew laugh at it everytime i pull it out to cut something with it. Also I have had to replace the Cord on it 3 times in 20 years.
TURTLE
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This is Turtle.
I use these tools in my HVAC business and I give them hell and they seem to do well.
---Corded Drill 3/8" B & D . ---Cordless drill 18 volt B & D but use to use Porter Cable & DeWalt but they cost more and I get the same time frame out of the B & D. ---circle saw 7.5" Corded Skill. ---Recept saw Porter cable corded is good but Milwakee sure is nice. ---Jig Saw B & D .
These are the ones i see that will last me for 2 to 3 years but I can buy the high dollar stuff and go maybe 3 or 4 years. The price of the high dollar stuff it just too great to pay when I get very little time difference out of the ones listed here.
This is some ideal for heavy use and very abusive to them when working with them.
TURTLE
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IMHO it all depends on what you are using the tools for. If you are a carpenter and build houses you have very different needs than if you a weekend hack (like myself) who uses the tools occasionally.
Being a weekend hack, and at the risk of offending the hardcores on this board, I love cordless tools. I literally found a Dewalt cordless drill 14.4v in the road about 7 years ago, bought a charger, and have used it ever since. (felt bad for the poor chump who lost it, put a sign up on a telephone pole near where I found it saying "Tool Found and my phone # but no one ever called.) It is all a matter of how much you plan to use them. I am starting to lust over those matched sets at Home Depot, where you have a bunch of cordless tools and they are all using the same batteries, I can see how that would be nice.
Save the flames, I know I have revealed myself as a pretender by the fact that I recomend: 1) cordless Tools 2) buying tools at Home Depot; but it makes a lot of sense if you are like me, and only get to use them occasionally for minor projects around the house, why buy an Hummer H2 if I only drive around on city roads, sure it would look cool, and I'd feel manly behind the wheel, but when I commute 60 miles a day on city roads, it makes a lot more sense to get a Honda Accord.
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Nothing wrong with Home Depot, but the matched sets they have, range from the very inexpensive Ryobi to more expensive brands. Based on the information I've gotten here, though, it appears that if one is going to be using the tools, more than a couple of times a year, then spending a bit more and getting a makita, or some similar brand, is a wise choice.

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That will work for some, but some brands have gone the high volume, low quality route in recent years. B & D, Craftsman, are not the same as their reputation from a quarter century ago. .

One of the woodworking magazines showed the difference between two brands, Skil and Bosch, that are made by the same company. The bearings in the Bosch were about twice the size of the cheaper one. The comutator on the mot has twice the segments. For the guy that uses a router twice a year, it may be OK, but it is not going to hold up and remain accurate for the heavier user or for more critical applications.
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TURTLE wrote:

Even if you're meticulously careful, you're eventually going to drop a cordless drill from the top of a stepladder. You're also eventually going to be in a position of pushing a tool slightly beyond what it's designed to handle, because you misjudged what you'd need when you left the shop, or whatever. I'd much rather drop or heat up a heavy duty tool.
Now you use your tools for a living and I almost never get paid to use mine, but I still think you've been really lucky if you really are using orange B&D and Skil tools satisfactorily in a contractor capacity. You are BEGGING for that stuff to lay down on you at exactly the wrong time.

I have the Porter-Cable recip with two articulation points--can't remember the cutesy marketing name for it--and I love it. You can get in anywhere with that thing.
--
Bo Williams - snipped-for-privacy@hiwaay.net
http://hiwaay.net/~williams /
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Harry, Unlike shoes and boots, relacing doesn't do much for power tools. You might want to consider buying new ones. Porter Cable and Dewalt are pretty good.

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I have heard mixed reviews about the Dewalt (isn't that the B&D high end, nowadays?). Don;t know much about the Porte Cable, but I'll look into that.

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Porter Cable is big in routers and wood working tools.
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Tool advice from this gearhead:
Educate yourself as to what it is you need. Shop price so you know what any particular tool sells for.
THEN buy the best you can afford, but if you know what you need and what they usually cost, you can always get a deal, second hand, etc.
Buy with the anticipation of what you will need a year from now. Lots of times, when you get to working with the tools, you will discover that the light duty smaller tools won't cut it once you really start to apply them. Then you will have to buy bigger and better, and will have to take a beating $$ wise on the tools unless you picked them up at a good price.
Lastly, a guy can't have too many tools.
MHO from my experiences.
Steve
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Harry - Might I suggest a slightly different approach.
Buy tools as you need them. When you need them buy the best quality you can afford while considering the cost and actual likely use. Pneumatic is good. Milwaukee, Makita are good. Cordless are good, corded are good. There are too many options. If you post over on rec.woodworking at least one person will ask you for the what do you need the tool for. The responses wont be too helpful.
I'll give you an example. I am building a small shaker style end table. One drawer, 18"x19" top and delicate tapered legs. There is this particular tool that will be helpful in this endeavor and I will invest in it. For project this its just a scraper, under $10, but I haven't needed one to date. I also need a particular router bit with a profile I do not have.
You get the point.
If you MUST go and get an assortment of power tools I would consider the Milwaukee 18v combo kit. (Amazon.com product link shortened)98712656/sr=8-3/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i3_xgl60/103-4978030-2091814?v=glance&s=hi&nP7846
Dewalt is made by B&D.
Have fun

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