Toilet slow, very slow to refill

I recently replaced the main works inside my toilet. The toilet had been taking too long to refill after a flush. The new insides work no better. The package in which they came said to turn off the water, undo the interior valve, hold a cup over it, and turn the water back on to remove sediment. I did that and it works. For a few flushes, and then back to 30 minute refills. With lots of hissing and sputtering from inside the tank.
Help?
Thanks in advance,
Joe
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JoeThomas wrote:

You don't say, but it sounds like a Fluid Master 400A. These use a rubber disc ("seal") which acts as a pilot-operated valve. Clever design but very sensitive to even tiny amounts of fine particles. If your water source contains particles (rust, corrosion, minerals) the 400A may not be a good choice.
If that sounds like you, replace it with an old-fashioned ball-cock (float on a long arm). These will allow great chunks of debris through without choking.
Jim
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Sounds like more sediment. Maybe flush for longer time period? Really honk it out?
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Christopher A. Young
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Stormin how do you " really honk it out "
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Put a big cup over it, turn the valve wide open. Let it honk out for several seconds.
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Regardless of your needs, installing a new toilet or replacing one tha
has seen better days is relatively easy. There are just a few steps an it can all be completed in one day.
Selecting a new toilet
In most states across the Untied States, new toilets must allow fo only one and a half gallons of water to flush at one time. This no only saves the environment with every flush, it also saves you eac month with your water bill. You will find that most community buildin codes also require these new toilets. It is always best to check wit your local community before installing the new toilet. The only thin left is to choose a style or color that best suits your family, need and interior design scheme of your bathroom.
Getting started
If you are installing a new toilet in a new location where one did no exist before you can skip this part. Replacing an old toilet has only couple of extra steps from installing a toilet in a new location.
Before you try to remove the old toilet, you need to be sure the wate has been shut off. Behind the toilet (and sometimes hidden in the bas cabinet adjacent to the toilet) is the water shut off valve. If yo remember the old phrase, Lefty Lucy Righty Tighty, you will be abl to know which way to turn the valve to cut off the water supply. Turn t the right to close the valve. You will need to be sure the water i turned off and you will need to empty the tank, so flush the toile twice. This helps to ensure you got most of the water out. There wil be a bit of remaining water in the tank so have towels or news paper o the floor to help mop up the water when the tank is removed.
Removing the old tank
Follow the water supply cut off valve to the tank of the toilet. Tak an adjustable wrench and clamp it onto the outside supply tubing on th coupling nut. With a pair of rib joint pliers, inside the tank, grab th other nut and turn left to loosen. You may need to hold the outside nu and adjustable wrench with your other hand to stabilize.
Once you have the water supply disconnected, it is time to remove th tank. With the same technique you just used to remove the supply line you need to hold the mounting bolt nut under the tank, while inside th tank you unscrew the mounting bolt from the main body of the toilet This will release the tank. Simply set the tank on the floor with som form of cushion to protect your flooring. Newspaper or old towels wil do just fine.
Next you will need to remove the floor bolts that hold the main toile body to the floor. Once you have these off, it is time to pull th toilet off the floor. The toilet is attached not only by the floo bolts, but also by adhesive. You will need to rock the toilet back an forth while leaning it forward to pry it loose.
Once the old toilet has been removed stuff a rag into the exposed pipe This helps keep the sewer gasses from entering the room and keep objects from falling into it. You can use a paint scraper or any fla tool to scrape the old adhesive remains from the floor and pipe gasket Try to clean as well as possible as this will help with better adhesio for the new toilet.
Installing a new toilet
If you are installing a new fixture where there was no fixture before supply line pipes will need to be installed. You will need to call professional plumber to do this for you as it is very involved an dangerous. Once you have the pipes installed, installing the ne fixture is a snap!
Lay some newspaper or old towels on the floor. Flip the new fixtur over and lay down on the paper or towel to protect your flooring and t expose the underside. The underside of the toilet will have a hole called a horn. This is where the water leaves the toilet to the sewer You need to place a new wax gasket on this horn. Most new toilets com with this wax gasket.
Flip the bowl back over and place the horn of the toilet into the floo pipe. Rocking it back and forth will help insure of a good fit. Once yo have the toilet bowl in place, you will need to level it while attachin the floor bolts at the same time. To do this, place the bolts through the holes into the floor loosely. With a level on top of the bowl, slowly tighten the floor bolts. You want the bowl to be tight to the floor, but not too tight as to crack the porcelain of the bowl. If you are unable to level the bowl and have the floor bolts tight at the same time, you may need small plastic shims to level the bow.
Attaching the tank
Some new toilets are one piece, meaning the tank and the bowl are not separated into two parts. However traditionally toilets do have a separate tank. Attaching the tank is even easier than the bowl.
Your new toilet will come with a flush valve, this is the mechanical contraption that fits inside your tank that attaches to the handle outside of the tank, and flushes the water. Assemble this according to the manufacturer instructions and attach inside your tank before installing the tank.
Your tank should come with a mounting cushion. This is a rubber piece that is laid under the tank to protect the tank from rubbing against the bowl, subsequently cracking either one. Lay the tank onto the bowl, being careful to position the two bolt holes over the matching holes underneath. Insert the mounting bolts and tighten. There may be gaps where your mounting bolts are, so you will need to fill any gaps with plumbers putty, available at any hardware store.
The only thing left is to hook up the water supply. Take the water supply line and screw to the bottom of the tank. Turn the water supply valve back on and flush! Congratulations! You have just installed your first toilet!
For more DIY info: http://www.essortment.com/in/HowTo.General/index.htm
--
luvr29


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