Toilet rocks when you sit on it?

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QED
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Oh pshaw, on Thu 19 Oct 2006 10:38:02a, Oren meant to say...

Add to that, forcing a bead of silastic or vinyl caulk between the perimeter of the base and the tile floor.
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Wayne Boatwright
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Wouldn't that prevent me from knowing if it begins to leak again?
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See my earlier post. Leave a gap at the back of the toilet, where water can seep out and leaks can be dectected. Placing it at the back will make it not visible.
-Tim
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Ah, did not see that. Great idea!
Tim Fischer wrote:

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On 20 Oct 2006 10:17:41 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I caulk them any time I do a repair..never a problem. Tim's gap idea in the back is an excellent nugget. -- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

The toilet should be supported by a ring of plaster of Paris under it. So, insert some wedges and get the position where you want it. Mix up the plaster and pack it under the thrown. It will become rock hard shortly. Note the wax ring has nothing to do with support -- it simply seals so sewer gas doesn't escape.
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If you have a wood subfloor, you should treat the water leak with great urgency. I'd wager that a little bit of water is leaking out with each flush (after a 'lot of activity' enough leaked water has built up to leak out from under the toilet). Since you have tile, you will most likely find a rough cutout around the flange (the toilet's drain hole in the floor) where some subfloor is exposed, which will inevitably suffer from water damage.
Tile sometimes causes sealing problems because of it's thickness and standard wax rings aren't always enough to bridge the gap between the flange and the toilet base. Use an extra thick ring, or in an extreme case (thick tile like travertine on top of 1/2" concrete backerboard on top of wood subfloor) you may have to stack rings.
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It is in an upstairs condo. Tile on top of lightweight concrete. I will have to pull it asap. Thanks for your help.
Joe wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Gads!
Water comes out?
Change your bees wax ring. Those rings are supposed to last 10 years, but I'd put it on your maintenance schedule for review every 5 years or so.
Leakage is gross and can result in dry rot.
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MRS. CLEAN wrote:

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Jeffry Wisnia
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MRS. CLEAN wrote:

That's the first time in my life I've ever heard anyone say that a wax ring has an expected lifetime that short when installed under a toilet that's properly seated.
What kind of failure mode occurs?
Can you offer a cite, perhaps from a wax ring supplier, which states that?
Jeff
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wrote:

Ring should not fail if properly seated. Water flowing down is not under pressure.
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Kathy
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First, the wax ring is shot and needs to be replaced and any water damage evaluated.
I heard a pro plumber recommend using pennies to shim toilets on uneven tile floors (uneven tile, not uneven floor, which is a bigger problem).
-rev
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

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likely a broken cracked flange or bolt:(
FIX IMMEDIATELY!
My mom didnt and had to replace entire bathroom floor including all new tile. the water leak gets into the plywood delaminates and rots floor. can cost thousands to fix if let go.
pull toilet, new wax ring check bolts and flange, repair floor if needed.
YOU NEED TO FIX THIS IMMEDIATELY!
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Well one thing you can do is ask chicks to come over to your place. Tell them your toilet ROCKS! When you say it, hold your hand up with the forefinger and pinky sticking up like the devil's horns sign. Chicks will dig it.
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jeffc wrote:

Ok Joe Dirt... :)
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Sell it to a ROCK band !!!!!
On 19 Oct 2006 10:02:13 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

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