Threshold Ramps

Yesterday. my elderly father informed me that he had difficulty getting over the upstairs thresholds with his wheelchair. I went to HD looked around for something beveled to make a gentler slope. Bought some wooden door molding and cut to fit. I quickly finished the job, but after testing it out, I realized I should have bought something with a smoother and gentler slope. I probably should have bought long pieces of clapboard cut them up and layered them.
I posted pictures of the new 'ramps'. http://mysite.verizon.net/stamkis/mypersonalsite /
I need to replace and/or reposition the 'problem' ramps today (see picture). The others I can replace with a better solution another day.
There are wires riding along both sides of this 'problem' threshold. They push the ramp above the threshold making navigation more difficult. Was thinking of buying some sort of sander/grinder just to make it level for now. Would this be feasible or would I be better off cutting the top edge with a handsaw?
Permanent alterative: After looking at the commercially available products I thought of buying rubber rubber door mats to cover these thresholds. I'd build up a tiered wooden platform. Then place the doormat over the threshold and platform. Any other suggestions would be more than welcome. Thanks!
Commercially made ramps can be costly... http://www.discountrampsplus.com/thresholdramps.html
Rubber ramp http://www.accessibleconstruction.com/services/ramps/6b.html
I thought of taking out the thresholds altogether. However, that could create another set of problems.
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I have some elderly friends with the same situation. If you Google Threshold ramp, you'll find a variety of them. I got one that's called a suitcase ramp. It folds in half, has a handle, and is made of aluminum. It works real well.

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The real advantage to the ramp is its length. Depending upon his arm strength,it's real tough to get over an abrupt incline. The ramp is around three feet long, so it's a gradual incline

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We normally make a threshold ramp from two pieces of plywood so that there is a tunnel for the wiring. Slope is 1" per foot if there is room for it.
On Sun, 16 Jul 2006 16:55:16 GMT, "Charlie S."

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How do you cut the plywood to get that kind of bevel? Do you use a special saw? I only have a 10" circular saw and a small hand held skil/jigsaw.

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Charlie S. wrote:

The bottom pieces of plywood are just strips that lay under the top piece. No bevel to them at all. Top piece of plywood is 3/4" thick. The bottom strip is also 3/4" material but only a few inches wide. Hold the far edge in good contact with the floor. Start the bottom strip slightly back from the threshold, pulling it farther back to raise the top piece where it meets the threshold. We do this on porches where the porch may be slanted relative to the threshold, so the strip is installed at an angle to make up the difference. If you needed a bevel, a block plane or belt sander would generate the shallow angle fairly quickly. Yellow pine door shim material that comes already cut in a wedge shape is available at any home center for about $1 per package. This would work inside OK.
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