Thermometer repair?

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On Sat, 20 Apr 2013 19:59:38 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

"Attracts microwaves", now there's a concept! A new physics is invented every day, on the Usenet.
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You didn't know? I put up an outdoor mercury thermometer. Microwave ovens stopped working for about a six block radius. It just sucked the microwaves right up. It was fun, watching all the repair companies coming to my neighborhood in panel vans. Aren't you embarassed that I'm not replying to your posts? . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .

"Attracts microwaves", now there's a concept! A new physics is invented every day, on the Usenet.
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On Sun, 21 Apr 2013 06:15:14 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Wow, interesting story. I did read an article in Popular Mechanics on "How to Improve TV Reception With A Rectal Thermometer".
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I may have read that article. Was that back in the days of black and white TV? . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
Wow, interesting story. I did read an article in Popular Mechanics on "How to Improve TV Reception With A Rectal Thermometer".
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On Sun, 21 Apr 2013 07:47:03 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Couldn't have been that far back. The cover had a shot of a 3D-TV.
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On Sun, 21 Apr 2013 06:15:14 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

OK -maybee the description is not totally accurate, but the result is the same. Mercury behaves differently from most other metals - it is diamagnetic (or antimagnetic) - and magnets DO attract microwave energy, while most metals reflect it.
This is an answer to the question "should you use a mercury thermometer in a microwave oven?"
On the other hand, putting a mercury thermometer in a microwave oven isn't a good idea. While mercury is a metal and will reflect most of the microwaves that strike it, the microwaves will push a great many electric charges up and down the narrow column of mercury. This current flow will cause heating of the mercury because the column is too thin to tolerate the substantial current without becoming warm. The mercury can easily overheat, turn to gas, and explode the thermometer. (A reader of this web site reported having blown up a mercury thermometer just this way as a child.) Moreover, as charges slosh up and down the mercury column, they will periodically accumulate at the upper end. Since there is only a thin vapor of mercury gas above this upper surface, the accumulated charges will probably ionize this vapor and create a luminous mercury discharge. The thermometer would then turn into a mercury lamp, emitting ultraviolet light. I used microwave-powered mercury lamps similar to this in my thesis research fifteen years ago and they work very nicely.
Louis A. Bloomfield
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in

Yes. It has three modes - mw only, oven only and both. I was in oven only mode.
--
"Where there's smoke there's toast!" Anon






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How metals react depends on length. If about 4 inches long will resonate and maximum current will occur in center. Other lengths will still develop nodes of current. No mercury please.
Greg
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On 4/20/2013 1:06 PM, KenK wrote:

You might try attaching a very strong cord to the end opposite the bulb and going outdoors, find a large open space and spin it around like you were spinning one of those noisemakers. A 24" cord should be long enough and the centrifugal force from spinning should move the mercury back into the bulb. ^_^
TDD
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nd

You were tempting the gods of fate if you put a mercury thermometer into an operational microwave oven., The mercury would heat up almost instantaneously and shatter the glass into smithereens, contaminationg the oven probably beyond repair. I have never heard of anyone using a mercury thermometer to cook, That would be like using a stopwatch to bake a cake, etc.
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wrote:

It was in oven-only mode, using a heating elenent instead of the magnetron.

I was using it to test the temperature; the oven is currently not heating correctly - says it has preheated to say 400 but is actually only at 300 and goes no higher - while the repairman was present.

--
"Where there's smoke there's toast!" Anon






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nd

To reinstate the column, you need to heat it so it reads maximum/ mercury goes to the top of the tube. If you examine the tube, at the end opposite the bulb there is usually another void to prevent the bulb from bursting when this state is reached. Do NOT overheat. If there is no void, do not let the column expand to the end of the tube while you are doing this. And wear eye protection.
The reason the mercury column has broken is that it is unsuitable for a microwave, the metal has boiled so making the gaps.
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h

m

he

and

't

Bingo! Harry gets the prize! BTDT
cheers Bob
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wrote:

The magnatron was not in use - the oven-only mode uses a heating element only.
--
"Where there's smoke there's toast!" Anon






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Snip!

Snip!

Well, there you are. If you don't use the magnetron it will take forever for your slow-cooker to make toast.
Also, it is obvious that your mercury thermometer needs lubrication. Can you give it a little shot of WD-40?
HTH
--
Adiós for now,

pilgrim
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Sun, 21 Apr 2013 11:40:05 -0500, pilgrim wrote:

And then stick it up...?
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nd

BTDT but only twice and it was for a relatively low temp thermometer so I think I used boiling water?
Simple solution.. BTDT but only twice.
Mercury thermometers typically have tiny expanded volume at the very upper reaches of the mercury column.
Slowly heat the thermometer until the mercury expands into that space. Be careful.... as the thermometer heats the little segments will move towards the top volume.
Wear safety goggles and check the thermometer often. As long as the column is segmented, the risk breakage is small. When the column "goes solid", that's when breakage occurs.
If you heat very slowly & check often...you'll be fine.
cheers Bob
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