Texturing walls

I mentioned in an earlier post I am de-wallpapering 5 rooms in my 1970's-era home. Aside from the bathrooms, I've decided I am anti-wallpaper. The previous owners plastered over the prior texturing to smooth the surface. *sigh* I have already stripped and redone one room completely (oh WHY did I start with the LARGEST room...:-))
In that room I used a paint texturizer in that room with one of those loop rollers and a trowel to flatten. It looks OK (especially with flat paint) but I'd like it to look a little more professional in the entry hall/dining room. The rest of the house that is not papered has what looks like a mop-press type pattern. I'm not crazy about it either - not quite smooth enough.
My question is this - what is a relatively easy method to texture and what material is recommended that would come out looking a little more professional? I've checked various websites (just like the textured paint) - it comes out looking fine when THEY do it, but some are obviously easier than others.
And yes, I realize a professional could do it best, but I've more desire and time than money these days.
TIA, Laurie
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done here, after previous serious water damage caused bad wall troubles. peeling cracking and spalling.
first remove and scrape EVERYTHING, dont worry about making things worse!
scrub the entire surface get all the dust off. rinse thoroughly.
paint the entire thing with oil based bin primer sealer, right over all damage. it will seal and help adhesion. coat liberally.
now use drywall mud, to first smooth as best you can all the rough areas. let dry..... a day at least.
now begin coating areas with a thin coat of drywall mud, use a wide brush to give it the texture you want.
it can come out perfect! I mean unreal good!
first try a small area somewhere to see if you like the finish.
if you dont use wet sponge or sand and start over.
Our home was previously rented, a old tenant was evicted after not paying any rent for 5 months. they left in the middle of the night but first turned on the tub water and shut drain. filled home with water. the landlord found out when a neighbor called him and reported water coming out of house. its a 2 story with basement, tenants had clogged basement drain too.
brought down all the cielings which were replaced, but little was done with the walls till after we bought the place,
drywall mud is the BEST plaster repair material!
and yes I HATE wallpaper too, some walls here were papered over, then painted, add the water damage it was horrible.
paint is far better and costs less too
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Laurie wrote:

Largest room first would be my choice ... downhill from there :o)

I've never used it or seen in place, but "Venetian Plaster" seems to be popular. I've run across quite a few websites which pertain. It isn't easy from appearances but might be doable. Then there is sponging and glazing which give a similar effect but aren't as permanent. That, too, takes some practice. Sponging is probably easier with more than one person working - one to roll on glaze and one to texture it. Mebbe :o)

I've lived in a couple of homes with badly done textured walls. I once made repairs to exterior stucco and discovered it was difficult to match the texture without some practice. I would suggest you use the product you like on scrap wood or heavy cardboard until you get what you want. I have tried marble faux painting, but had to resort to wallpaper in my two baths to get it right. Easy. Not permanent. :o)
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Laurie wrote:

http://www.homeenvy.com/db/4/234.html
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