Tear out or just pave over asphalt driveway?

Page 4 of 4  

wrote:

I'm not saying this would happen to anybody else, but...
We have an asphalt-over-asphalt drive. No idea when either layer was put down; the house is 62 years old and we've owned it for 10.
Last fall we prepared to seal our driveway. Himself was power- washing. He knows what he's doing, and it was going along quite well. He got to the end of the driveway, right where it joins the apron that was installed by the county when they paved our road about 15 years ago. The surface there was mightily cracked, although it didn't look much different from other cracked areas. When he hit it with the water, there was a great volcano of water and broken asphalt, a couple of feet high and about 3-4 feet square.
Until then, we'd had no idea that we had two layers of asphalt. It's a little hard to tell how that top layer was applied, but it doesn't look to have bonded to the bottom layer at all. I hope modern methods are more effective.
Now, for all I know, the bottom layer could be 30 years old and the top layer could be 20 years old. Or vice versa.
We bought a boatload of cold patch and a plate compactor. It looks pretty good, but I'm saving up for a new driveway.
Cindy Hamilton
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 26 Apr 2010 07:54:17 -0700 (PDT), Cindy Hamilton

But if you couldn't even tell you had two layers, doesn't that mean the second layer was pretty good? Maybe it doesn't have to bond if gravity holds in place. I know I'm not bonded to my bed, but I still seem to stick there pretty well.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If water got in between you and your bed and froze, you'd be out of there pretty quick too. If the top layer does not bond to the bottom, water gets between and freezes (at least up here) and then you KNOW it was 2 layers. Happens on the highways a lot if the crews don't get the cracks sealed up tight well before freeze-up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 26 Apr 2010 23:33:52 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

This may well be true sometimes, but in the case Cindy brought, she'd lived there for 10 years and the top layer was an unknown time longer than that. If what you talk about had happened, she would have already known that there were two layers, right?
Perhaps you are using bonded differently from how she used it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, we're using it the same way. Gravity was doing a fair job of holding the top layer down until we hit it with a power washer. I'm pretty sure that if we started power washing between you and your bed, you'd rise up, too.
It's the difference between having a problem and knowing about it, and having a problem and not knowing about it. Oh, we knew some areas had trouble, but it wasn't "in our faces". The thing is still eminently drivable, and the snow blower (paddle type) didn't have any trouble last winter. But replacing it is still on our radar for the future.
Cindy Hamilton
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 24 Apr 2010 19:35:34 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

Ive noticed on some highway jobs they take up the old asphalt and melt it right back on the highway. I suppose it gets more asphalt added to it. After all, all its made of is asphalt (tar) mixed with stones. This seems like a great idea. We have enough trash to dump in landfills as it is.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.