Tear out or just pave over asphalt driveway?

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wrote:

Do you know how it got buried? How did you find it?
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mm wrote:

Curious about that one myself. Sounds like there is a story behind it.
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aem sends...

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On 04/26/2010 09:26 PM, aemeijers wrote:

I knew it was there - the previous owners of the house were, oddly pertinent to this thread, very environmentally conscious and also particularly concerned with water management. Apparently they knew someone who had a tree service and invited him to come and blow wood chips on the property; seems that the fresh stuff went on the driveway and when it was nicely composted it got thrown into the yard and more was laid down. They had the place for appx. 18 years... so my yard is a good six inches higher than my neighbors' (but nice soil!) and I've screened, shoveled, and given away more compost/soil to garden-oriented friends than I care to remember in an effort to a) clean off the driveway and b) properly grade around the house and garage.
I pretty much knew where the driveway was, because there was a road out front and a garage in back, so I figured there had to be a driveway connecting the two :)
I'm not quite enough of an eco-weenie to be willing to park my cars on dirt, but do appreciate the concerns enough to be willing to try permeable pavement if the cost penalty isn't too great.
nate
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replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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Nate Nagel wrote:

Hope you had a lot of foundation showing above the grade/mulch line. Perfect recipe for termite infestation and hidden ponding against foundation. When I was house-shopping a few years ago, I had to pass on a couple of otherwise-interesting places because the idiots had graded higher than the siding. Real estate agent had the gall to act surprised when I pointed out the obvious water infiltration on the inside of the wall in those spots.
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The house is of masonry construction (block with brick facing) up to the floor of the 2nd level, and it passed a pre-purchase termite inspection, so no worries, although I do understand your concerns. There's some evidence of water having gotten into the basement in the past, but it seems mostly due to a combination of clogged gutters, a poorly installed basement window, and lack of flashing on the ledger board of the deck behind the house. I have corrected the grading in all but a small area since purchasing the house.
The only "infestation" that I had any issues with was with ants somehow going up the kitchen wall and coming in behind the trim of one window and from there to the kitchen counter, but after the application of some acrylic caulk around the trim I haven't seen them back.
nate
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So what do you think about 2-3 inches of new asphalt on top of a well- settled base???, that's back to my original question.
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote the following:

Call some pavers and get estimates. As long as a pave over will not affect drainage (to the road or to the garage), I'd go with it. Ripping up the old driveway and starting over will also start the settling process all over again. Besides, it's cheaper.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Paving companies want a NEW BASE, so the new pavement doesnt crack.
they skim off the old pavement and base, and avoid disturbing the soil underneath to minimize future settling.
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wrote:

Whenever I've thought about the possibility of putting additional asphalt on top of existing, this obvious problem comes up. Usually you have areas where the driveway meets and existing grade, structure, etc. The best examples might be the garage door apron and the street. If you put down 3 inches of new asphalt over the old, how would you deal with that?
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wrote:

I asked a similar question a few weeks back. The general consensus was that the paving company would have NO PROBLEMS extending my turn- around and putting a new finish coat on top of the existing asphalt.
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On Apr 28, 1:20�pm, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

The base stone gets contaminated and filled with dirt, so water cant drain under the asphalt.
add freezing and guaranteed cracks and heaving
around here paving companies refuse to warranty any driveway without a new base
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On Apr 28, 1:20pm, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

Does the asphalt meet the garage door apron? street? etc? If so, how are they going to put 3 inches of new asphalt on top of it and meet the existing boundaries?
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On Apr 29, 8:55�am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

they can just remove the offending areas, but long term its a ineffective fix, as a buddy found out.
he had his driveway skim coated, within 2 years it cracked EVERYWHERE the old surface had cracks.
then he had the entire thing dug up and done properly.
he paid extra to remove both layers of asphalt, more to dump, harder to dig.
properly maintained a asphalt driveway can last a long time.
the one next to the home i grew up in as a kid is over 50 years old, mine here about 25. its not perfect but holding up well
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On Apr 29, 8:55am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I can only find reference to it on google groups, but nothing was said about 3". They told me all I needed was a 1" topcoat compressed to 1/2".
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.home.repair/browse_frm/thread/22f8ee96bbc2e81e/3c2aa427866a3bcc?lnk=gst&q=extending+asphalt+driveway#3c2aa427866a3bcc
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On Apr 29, 4:38�pm, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

one inch compressed to a half inch?
only good if you preping to sell immediately, enjoy the one year it will look decent....
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wrote:

Very good, Watson.

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Hey, sometimes the obvious answer is the right one :)
nate
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Saw a tv show where the owners laid a astroturf product that looked like grass and had holes in it that grass grew thru put over their front lawn for parking. looked nice, since the home had no on site parking.
how this held up over time? who knows?
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I've also seen waffle-pattern concrete pavers that accomplish teh same thing, but I personally don't want to do that being a person of old cars and many tools; they'd work fine if you just want a driveway to drive on, but they don't seem to be jackstand or creeper friendly.
nate
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I just watched a permeable concrete install job last week in the Tri- Cities Virginia area.
It was interesting. It's basically concrete without sand, just aggregate. It won't pour, it takes a lot of hand labor to get spread, so I'm guessing it may be fairly expensive. Not a DIY job at all, you have to spread it and compact it fast so you need a big crew. They used a big powered roller to surface it.
For a business that has to meet stormwater regulations it is probably cost effective because you can avoid big detention pond structures. For a homeowner I'm inclined to doubt it though I didn't ask the cost per area. I'm just judging by the size of the crew I saw working, and working hard!
If you're interested I'll find the name of the supplier.
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