Surge surpressors

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On Tue, 26 Jul 2011 10:02:17 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Faraday cage.

Very little electronics in a 100YO phone.

That too.

You do that if you actually want to use the electronics. If you want to make sure it doesn't get hit, don't use it. ;-)

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wrote:

Some years ago I bought a bunch of Curtis strips on sale. Also have RF filtering which I like.
I still keep planning on grounding my side porch, which has an aluminum roof, and iron pillars and railing, all connected together. It is tied to the Ac ground via a metal lamp box. I will remember to get that ground rod!!! I don't really know if Thats code, but I know it's a problem.
Greg
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On Tue, 26 Jul 2011 11:42:57 -0500, Vic Smith

You can protect equipment from lightning strikes. I worked for a corporation that sold business machines internationally in SW Florida. Our customers were not going to accept the answer that they had to unplug all of their mainframes, PCs, cash registers and ATMs every afternoon for 6 months of the year. We got pretty good at mitigating lightning damage. We went from a couple calls a day to one or 2 a year.
1. create a good ground electrode system 2. use point of entry protection on every wire that comes into the building, bonded to that ground electrode system, preferably at the same point. 3 put Ferrite beads on all of your cables 4 use point of use protectors on all of your equipment that picks up every wire going into that equipment bonded to the grounding conductor.
In extreme cases you also may need a bonding wire from the frame to frame of interconnected equipment but this is usually when you are dealing with very long distances, like the register out at the pool bar in a hotel ... Again with ferrites on the signal cable.
I have had the mast that my weather station is on hit directly by lightning and it did not take out the PC or the weather station.
Actually it was hit twice. The first time it fried both, then I did #3 and #4 and the second time all I had to do was reboot the PC.
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On Jul 26, 10:30 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Finally, a voice of reason.
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In

You're forgetting at least one important spec: How long that suppression current can be withstood by the device and what its expected duration might be. There certainly are such surge supressors available but talking about only one spec out of many, all variable, is sayiing absolutely nothing, nada, zip. In addition to that, there is surge suppression in the xfmr out on the pole so unless a strike hits very close to the bldg connection, it's going to still benefit from that clamping action. You guys all need to do some research of at least 101 calibre information.
HTH,
Twayne`
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The issue of how long that suppression current can be withstood is rarely specd directly in the major whole house surge suppressor data sheets that I have seen. It is spec'd indirectly as the amount of energy in joules that it can handle. Typically they spec amps, joules and clamping voltage. And as amps go up, so does the joule rating. Which is not to say you won't see variation, but I think it would be unusual to find a device rated at say 40K amps from any of the major manufacturers that is woefully inadequate with regard to the joule rating compared to other 40K devices from other major manufacturers.
In other words, you are right there is more to it than amps, but if you bought just on the amp spec from the major manufacturers you would not be left with a totally inadequate surge protector.

Which means what? That we don;t need a surge protector? That we need a smaller one?

Speak for yourself. Nothing you've brought up in this thread so far is new to Bud, Tom or I.
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Excuse me for hijacking the thread but this seem like a good place to ask. Im using a Leviton 3 phase unit on my home which is wire for 240 single phase. I just wired it in to a 240 20 amp breaker in the panel and left the wire for the third phase disconnected. Anything wrong with doing this?
Jimmie
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