surge protection on washer??

Page 1 of 4  
Can a surge protector such as this
<http://networkserverpowerstrips.net/tripp-lite-isobar-noise-filter-surge-suppressor-4-outlet-power-strip-model-ib-4/
be used on a modern clothes washing machine to protect the washer electronics?
Also, the unit offers two levels of protection: what level offers more protection: 50db or 75db? I'm guessing the 75db, but don't know anything about this stuff.
Thanks
--
Web based forums are like subscribing to 10 different newspapers
and having to visit 10 different news stands to pickup each one.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, January 25, 2014 8:14:58 AM UTC-5, CRNG wrote:

Yes, it will offer some surge protection. The 75db refers to the noise filtering, which I would not be concerned about. It's surges from lightning coming in on utility lines that are destructive. Instead of protecting just the washer, why not put in a whole house surge protector at the panel? That will protect not only the washer, but other appliances too. You can get a good one for $125, that will give a lot more protection than the one you're looking at. Then supplement that with plug-in type on any applicances that are connected to more than just AC, eg cable tv, phone, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 25 Jan 2014 05:32:12 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Thanks for the comment. I do in fact have a surge protector (or lightning arrester??) at the electric meter that the electric company installed years ago. It's cylindrical, about 2" in diameter and 3" long and connects into the base of the electric meter mount box. Since I don't know exactly what and how good it is, I also like to put additional protection on sensitive equipment. This is a new bottom of the line Maytag washer (replacing a 25 year old unit) but it still has more electronics than I prefer.
BTW, this leads me to another question. Can surge protectors be "chained" in series thus increasing the amount of protection? E.G. if you have to 500 joule protectors and connect them in series will that give 1000 joules of protection?
Regards, CG
--
Web based forums are like subscribing to 10 different newspapers
and having to visit 10 different news stands to pickup each one.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The protectors can be put in series. Each one will add to the protection. I am not sure ,but would think the number would just add up so that two of the 500 joules would give 1000 of protection. Many of the less expensive ones have the MOV device across the line and one from each line to the ground. Beter ones will have a coil in series with the line. That is why I think the numbers will just add.
--
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/25/2014 9:59 AM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

You will not find any manufacturer that suggests that. Protectors with high ratings are readily available.
It is also a violation of UL standards to daisychain outlet strips, which is likely to also cover plug-in protectors.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ralph Mowery wrote:

Hi, B4 anything, we should talk about GOOD quality built product not El Cheapo junk. My idea is I'll apply protection right at the logic board. Where I live power surge is very rare and never heard it damaged. anything. Lightining is also rare, my HAM radio antenna tower never got hit(I have a protection for my gears tho). No insurance coverage?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


Where I lived before this house I had about a 40 foot ham tower up. It was also near the top of the rise of land that was near it. ANever got hit with many lightning storms.
A transformer that feeds the house let go one night during a thunder storm. There was a whole house protector about the size of a baby food jar outside the house at the meter. It did not look damaged from just looking at it. The surge did take out two differant protection strips. I think they were the Isobar 6 outlet types. One for the ham gear and one for the TV. The equipment was ok. The built in oven smoked, but all it did was burn out a trace on the circuit board and take out the MOV. Service call for the stove was the minimum they charge.
A neighbor that feeds off the same transformer lost his TV and a few other small things. All power wiring in the area was above ground.
--
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think there is something about mov's in equipment. Something not permitted or something like that. I don't remember seeing any in equipment. They would have to be sealed up, because they blow up. I'd have to dig out my book, PC Power protection. You can put stuff in your own equipment.
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, January 28, 2014 1:12:16 PM UTC-5, Tony Hwang wrote:

Insurance claim for a typical washer? Most policies have deductibles that are higher than the cost of a typical washer. Plus, I'm not sure they would cover damage from a surge anyway. We're not necessarily talking about a direct lightning strike to the house. If there was a surge on the power lines and the washer quits working, good luck proving the cause.... And you file the claim, even if you wind up getting a couple hundred bucks, then they raise your rates.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, January 25, 2014 10:38:39 AM UTC-5, CRNG wrote:

It certainly wouldn't hurt and will most likely help. How much depends on many factors. If you had two MOV's that were exactly the same and they were connected in parallel, that would give you 2X the max surge handling. But what your proposing has some differences. For example, the second surge protector has 3 ft or whatever of wire separating it from the first. That wire has impedance and the surge looks like an impulse, so it's not exactly the same.
But the first line of defense is a whole house surge protector and it sounds like you have one. That is where you want to stop most of the energy from ever getting into the house. I guess one problem with the power company supplied one is that you probably don't know what exactly it is, what it's rated at, etc., unless you can see a label on it. Also, the whole house ones typically have a light that indicates they are working. Does the power company's have one? Was it a one time charge or do they charge you by the month?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 25 Jan 2014 08:03:52 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

No, there is no indicator light on the power company suppressor. It is a Delta Lightning Arrestor model LA302-R
<http://www.affordable-solar.com/store/lightning-arrestors/la302r-AC-Lghtning-arrestor
I don't understand the specs, but it looks like it will protect against any surge, not just lightning. Does that seem correct?

There was/is no charge for it; which amazed me given my particular power company.
Thank you for your comments. I appreciate it.
Regards, CG
--
Web based forums are like subscribing to 10 different newspapers
and having to visit 10 different news stands to pickup each one.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, January 25, 2014 12:49:29 PM UTC-5, CRNG wrote:

Yes, the specs say it will take a 10,000 amp surge pulse with voltage let through of 480V. Bigger surges, then a bigger voltage rise will exist. Where the surge comes from doesn't matter as long as it's the same voltage, current, duration, etc. Appliances have some small surge protection in them that can then handle the remaining 480V pulse, probably couple times that. So, that protector should be fine. The only problem I see is how you know it's working. Actually, I'm not sure how the indicator lights on the ones that have them work and if they really do tell you with 100% assurance that it's working.

That's a good thing.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, January 25, 2014 11:03:52 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

After reading Bud's response, I agree with him. I was thinking from a standpoint of a theoretical electrical aspect with regard to having more than one surge protector in series. But from a practical standpoint, ie why use two when you can get a higher rated single one, daisy chaining anything, especially to a washer, doesnt' sound like a good idea, etc.
Plus you have a whole house protector at the meter. If it were me, I'd probably be satisfied with just that and not put anything on the washer. And if you do put one on it, the 3300 joule one you're looking at should be plenty.
I did notice one additional thing. I think that surge protector also has a 12 amp breaker? What does the washer call for? I think they usually go onto a dedictaed 15 amp outlet, not sure how much they actually pull and if 12 amps is OK, won't trip, etc.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 25 Jan 2014 11:13:03 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Yes, reading the comments here I now have the same conclusion.

It's only 330 joules, not 3300, which seems a little light-duty to me considering what I have learned here and the specs of current generation plug-in suppressors. I had forgotten about the suppressor at the meter. I think I will replace the 330 joule unit with a 700 joule Trip-Lite ($9) when I have a chance, but now that I remember the lightning arrestor, together with your comments, it doesn't seem urgent.

The spec sheet I found indicates an output rating of 9 amps. That's not good. Thanks for reminding me.
Regards, CG
--
Web based forums are like subscribing to 10 different newspapers
and having to visit 10 different news stands to pickup each one.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, January 25, 2014 5:25:47 PM UTC-5, CRNG wrote:

Where are you seeing 330? The thing is supposed to be an lb-4. The closest thing I found is this, which is 3300 joules. It looks similar:
http://www.tripplite.com/sku/IBAR4/
I had forgotten about the suppressor

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 25 Jan 2014 14:45:37 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Well, that's interesting. I'm seeing the 330 joules here <http://www.tripplite.com/products/model-print/mid/1347 mine looks exactly like this _except_ mine does not have 240V written on it. I'm guessing one of those spec sheets may have a typo?
--
Web based forums are like subscribing to 10 different newspapers
and having to visit 10 different news stands to pickup each one.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, January 26, 2014 7:00:49 AM UTC-5, CRNG wrote:

.
No, they look like different products. It's not just that one is rated at 3300 joules, the other at 330. The 3300 joule spec sheet has other major differences, max surge current of 85K, or 135K amps vs 22K for the other product, much lower clamping voltage, etc.
I think the problem is that the seller's posting only calls it an "LB-4" and that doesn't exactly match a specific product, at least as far as I can tell. One thing is for sure, between those two data sheets there are major differences and one is a much more substantial product.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/25/2014 1:13 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Having the MOVs in 2 locations with impedance between them is one of the reasons I wouldn't recommend it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, January 26, 2014 3:45:43 AM UTC-5, bud-- wrote:

I agree we don't know exactly what the effect will be. But you do have MOV's in multiple locations all the time anyway. For example, a whole house protector, then maybe another one on the HVAC, plug-ins for a PC or appliance, followed by another MOV inside the PC/appliance, etc.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Having MOVs in locations with impedance inbetween is the reason to do it. The first MOV takes part of the surge, if any reaches the next one, it then helps with the protection. The impedance slows the rise time of the surge and helps with the surpression. Some of the surge is dissapated in the inductance.
--
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.