Washing Machine Surge Protector

One of the TV home improvement show electricians recommended using a surge protector with current model clothes washers as they have so much electronics controlling the wash cycle.
Most of the surge protectors I looked at spec an 1875 watt capacity. I can't find any info on my machine's current draw and wonder if one of those surge protectors would be OK or would it get fried?
Machine is LG 1201CW.
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On 5/22/2017 3:46 PM, Wade Garrett wrote:

It requires a 10A circuit. The max load would be 1200 watts so 1875 would work. http://www.lg.com/us/washers/lg-WT1201CV-top-load-washer
You're welcome
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The machine is for 120 volts at 10 amps. That is 1200 watts.
As many devices are only suspose to be about 1500 watts or less, you are good to go with that surge protector.
Now is the time for a certain fellow to chime in and give a lot of talk about how they are no good and the only one that works is a whole house one or some such thing.
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On 5/22/2017 4:14 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Why waste your money on a plastic toy? Whole house suppressors are much more effective.
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On Monday, May 22, 2017 at 3:46:18 PM UTC-4, Wade Garrett wrote:


mb.”

Put a good whole house one in at the panel to protect all the stuff that's only connected to just AC. TV, etc that are connected to cable, phone, etc should have additional plug in protection that all those lines go through.
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On Mon, 22 May 2017 16:21:04 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

I can't believe that in the 21st century, manufacturers won't put a couple of 10 cent MOVs in their machines. Throw in a ferrite bead or two and you have a surge protector.
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On Monday, May 22, 2017 at 7:36:50 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Apple did that even in the Apple II. It was as ineffective as power strip protectors.
A protector is only as effective as its earth ground. Explains why a 'whol e house' protector (properly earthed) is so effective. And why MOVs withou t that low impedance (ie less than 10 foot) connection to earth can even co mpromise better protection already inside appliances.
Informed consumers always earth a 'whole house' solution. To enhance that protection, then earth ground is upgraded. Since a protector (or MOV) is o nly as effective as its earth ground.
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wrote:

They were asking about you. Glad to see you are still OK.
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On Tuesday, May 23, 2017 at 1:15:42 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

ip protectors.

hole house' protector (properly earthed) is so effective. And why MOVs wit hout that low impedance (ie less than 10 foot) connection to earth can even compromise better protection already inside appliances.

at protection, then earth ground is upgraded. Since a protector (or MOV) i s only as effective as its earth ground.

Yeah, I saw Uncle wondering where Wtom was and I figured he's be here any minute as soon as the word surge was mentioned.
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On Tuesday, May 23, 2017 at 12:23:20 PM UTC-4, westom wrote:

p protectors.

ole house' protector (properly earthed) is so effective. And why MOVs with out that low impedance (ie less than 10 foot) connection to earth can even compromise better protection already inside appliances.
Total nonsense, a plug-in will supplement the tiny MOV inside the appliance and work with it. That's what the IEEE documents that have been provided here many time say and show. The plug-in only increases the protection, because it has much larger MOVs. And which MOV would a person rather have an incoming surge see first? The big one in the inexpensive plug-in surge protector that is easily replaced or the smaller one inside the $1000 TV?

t protection, then earth ground is upgraded. Since a protector (or MOV) is only as effective as its earth ground.
Still unanswered after all these years, if a direct, nearby, earth ground is essential, then how do those MOVs inside appliances work? At times you've held positions ranging from they work and that's why appliance manufacturers put them in, to at other times denying that they use MOVs at all.
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On Tue, 23 May 2017 10:52:32 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

Before I did my inspector gig I was a hardware guy at IBM in Florida. Lightning was our biggest single cause of failure until we learned a bit about surge protection. A lot of the knowledge out there came from central and SW Florida. The first thing is most electronic damage is not coming from that "finger of god" lightning strike right next to you. It comes from the difference of potential between different machines. The classic is the telco/modem and the PoCo/PC. That is what your primary surge protection should deal with If you catch it at the service entrance, all the better but you need all protectors tied to the same ground electrode. You can also have smaller surges generated on the load side of the service. This is why you use point of use protection. We also went as far as running bonding wires between machines that were separated by some distance making them as direct as possible and then looping the data lines to make them longer., You can lake them look linger than that with ferrites. The idea is your ground and your point of use protector can stop the surge before it gets there. I won't even try to make the case theoretically. I just know the results. We went from 1000 lightning calls a year in my 3 county area to about 2.
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On Tuesday, May 23, 2017 at 2:38:26 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

What you say is also totally consistent with the NIST and IEEE surge protection guides.
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On Wed, 24 May 2017 09:55:44 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

A lot of this was done at State Farm in Winter Haven in conjunction with the University of Central Florida. UCF has a very extensive lightning program. I worked with the State Farm guys because we had the contract for all of their agent data processing. We took what they established and expanded on that. The bond wire between machines was a State Farm idea. The ferrites was us along with hardening your ground electrode system. We found up to 30 volts between the grounding systems in buildings less than 100 feet apart. Ground is not always "ground" particularly if they are just driving rods. These days if I was building a complex with multiple buildings I would bury a grounding matrix that connected all of them with copper.
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wrote:

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Peak surge of motors is main concern. Don't use plastic, epoxy, only fire safe metal boxes with no holes or sockets.
Greg
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Don't use plastic, epoxy, only fire

+1
a MOV in an external plastic box can be more dangerous than not having one at all
m
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On 05/22/2017 03:46 PM, Wade Garrett wrote:

As others have stated, the best place for a surge suppressor is in the meter enclosure.
Next best is in your main breaker panel.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
I wouldn't waste my money on cheap plug-in crap.
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