sump pump question


I tried out my new Zoeller non-automatic .3 hp sump pump, and the instructions say to drill a 3/16 hole on the discharge pipe about equal to the top of the machine. I did this, and not only does it reduce the discharge pressure, but it makes an irritating spraying sound when the water level drops below that point and the water sprays against the side of the pit. Instructions say that this hole is required to deal with air buildup when used in conjunction with a one- way valve. Does anyone have an opinion on if the hole is really needed?
On another note, I didn't know that the the pump I was replacing was . 5 hp, and it appears that the lower hp of my new pump results in a dramatic drop in pressure. Interestingly, the old pump is actually an automatic unit with a float switch, where they just taped up the switch in an always-on position so that the on/off function is left to the separate switch unit that the pump is plugged into. I didn't discover this until I pulled out the old pump and found the float switch taped to the discharge pipe.
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the hole is not needed.
s

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On 7/18/2008 9:15 PM Steve Barker DLT spake thus:

>

> > the hole is not needed.
What he said. I've installed two of those same pumps, and the people at the plumbing supply store I bought them at said to ignore those instructions. They work just fine without any extra holes.
Go ahead and plug the hole (find a screw and mash it in, or drill & tap if you're a little more on the anal side; stainless screw for perfectionists).
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.
I wouldn't be so quick to say that the hole is not needed with all pumps under all circumstances. The small hole is there to prevent air lock. With a check valve, if the sump goes dry, the section of pipe between the pump and the check valve will fill with air. Depending on the pump, this air could prevent the pump from picking up enough water to get going. In essence the pump could remain air locked and not pump while the basement floods. IF it happens depends on the pump design, how deep in the water the pump sits, etc.
I;ve had pumps that did not have the air escape hole and worked fine. But I'd read the pump directions and/or consult the manufacturer and play it safe.

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On Jul 18, 11:17 pm, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

...
Assuming that there is a check valve above the pump that does not leak back _and_ that the pump totally empties the pump housing before shutting off, yes, it could air lock even with the pit full of water. There would be no way for water to push the air out of the pump chamber.
Harry K
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

then I'd paint a small sign over it to say what its for...
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AE Todd wrote:

Of course you don't need REALLY need that hole; the pump manufacturer was just being perverse -- you know, "goofing" you. Who REALLY needs manufacturers instructions? Who's REALLY heard of Zoeller, anyway?
Try the following google search:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=%22sump+pump%22+%22air+lock%22+hole
But, first, be sure to ask someone on alt.home.repair if you REALLY need to do a web search. I'll bet you don't, REALLY.
BTW, just to keep the manufacturer's joke going, I drilled that little hole and even check it out to be sure it's open. But, hey, that's just my sense of humor. LOL.
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wrote:

The proper solution is to drill the hole, then put a cover over it, with a sign that says, "In case of air lock, open." If you're not home, you can have a neighbor do it.
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