Suggestion for cordless tool makers

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Why not offer a CORDED battery replacement?
If the battery poops out, you could continue to use the tool with a cord - much like you can with a cell phone.
The working parts business of battery charger that comes with the tool is smaller than the battery itself, and could easily be fitted in a case the size of the battery.
In the alternative, why doesn't some clever entrepreneur concoct the device to sell as an after-market product? Certainly non-OEM battery replacements are available; why not power-cord replacements for the battery?
Heck, I've got some old batteries lying about, I might just try building a small DC power supply to fit in the scooped-out innards of one.
Just thinking out loud.
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You should have patented it, next year they will be out, they just read your post.
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On Fri, 04 Dec 2009 04:15:35 -0800, ransley wrote:

I'm sure they all have it sewn up so that nobody can make anything to fit in the battery slot of their tools without their blessing :-(
re. running from charger, I doubt the charger has enough guts to provide the power to seriously run the tool (they'll be designed to charge the battery at a far lower rate than it can actually deliver), but a suitable PSU could be built to fit in the space of most batteries...
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Someone has done this. I think Black&Decker.

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but will not supply the high current drawn by the tool under load.

12V tools could use and adapter to plug into a car's cig lighter outlet,or be connected across one of those "jump starter" packs.

"Cliff Hartle" top-posted,screwing up the thread continuity;

several years ago,no longer made.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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HeyBub wrote:

My Firestorm came with 2 batteries. What's wrong with just swapping out the battery? My other battery will be recharged by the time I need it. If you need more than that, get an electric (corded) drill. I have a 1/2 inch plug in for heavy jobs.
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Quote: "Heck, I've got some old batteries lying about, I might just try building a small DC power supply to fit in the scooped-out innards of one."
Been thinking the same!
An excellent basic idea; although I wish batteries were 'Universal'! And yes a power supply MIGHT be built into a dud battery case to power a cordless; although it would have to supply a much higher current capacity than that for just recharging a typical cordless battery, continuously, over a few hours!
Welcome any comments on the Calcs. below.
Also see my previous post about setting up two old truck batteries to power our 24 volt computer UPSs. And extending that to our main work bench. Our good neighbour mentioned recently that he's thinking of replacing his four transport truck batteries again; before, or during this winter. So although we have three of his previous ones they'd do fine. We also have an heavy old-timer 26 volt DC battery charger supply than can be modified etc.
If the 24 volt proves too high for a couple of the older 12/14 volt cordless drill with dud batteries and dud chargers am thinking of a 12 volt tap (to keep it simple) or a voltage regulator circuit to step down to say 18 volts. To date experiments seem to show that several of these older 12 volt cordless work fine on anything from 10 to 18 volts; although how much torque they'd have at 10 volts not yet checked. The idea being that the now useless cordless drills be used at the bench; we have some other newer cordless with good batteries and chargers that still work for outside/portable work. Typically a replacement Bosch charger was $70+, two new batteries around $50 each, total $170 plus shipping etc. for a Bosch set (including carrying case) originally bought for $150! Answer go out and buy new! Price planned obsolescence? We didn't buy another Bosch however!
Calcs: Typical cordless drill takes say 60 watts? That's 12 volts at 5 amps = 60 watts. Or maybe 100 watts, that's around 8 or 9 amps. If a typical cordless battery is 2.5 ampere hour it will last about 2.5/ 5 to 2.5/8 = 0.5 to 0.3 hours ( 12 to 30 minutes say) running time? So somewhere around 5 to 10 amps (at 12 to 18 volts) sounds about right?
Obviously a good idea brewing? And even if a typical cordless required say 150 watts that's still only 1.2 amps at 'mains supply voltage of 120 volts' .So lightweight lamp cord (18AWG) could be used for an AC wall plug-in part of it!. Certainly a lot bigger than a Wall-wart but sounds technically feasible?
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Oh btw; tried running a cordless without any battery on DC from a small supply such as those supplied to power a CB radio. The PS was rated at around 3 amps. And it worked OK, without load on the drill. And proper polarity +/- was needed. Also tried same voltage AC (Approx. 12 volts RMS) and while the drill rotated and would reverse it obviuosly didn't like it; probably the speed controll/trgger not designed for AC! Same results with three cordless of different manufacturers.
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I think there's a couple of reasons, a crummy reason and a good reason.
Crummy reason: Because it is very much part of their product strategy that when the batteries quit taking a charge a couple of years after purchase, *you buy a whole new tool*. There used to be companies that made affordable tools that lasted a homeowner's lifetime...where are they now? Gone, their brands walking among us like zombies, artificially animated by holding companies and investment funds. The smart money is in planned obsolescence.
Good reason: take this DeWalt that turns up on a random Google search: http://www.grainger.com/1/1/134517-dewalt-dc920ka-drill-driver-kit-18-0-vdc-1-2-3-spd.html. Blurb says it's a 510 Watt motor (it's rare to see Wattage quoted for cordless tools, but let's take this as typical) so that 18 V battery pack is putting out 28 Amps. The leftover power bricks you've got lying around from old cellphones put out *milli*-amps. Sure you can build or buy a 28 Amp 18 V power supply, but it ain't gonna fit in to the hollowed-out battery case, and you'll need booster cables to connect it to the tool.
Chip C Toronto
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Its a great idea but physics gets in the way. :(
Take a look at a Malibu light 12v 300W power supply......its a brick. I doubt that a AC/DC power supply with enough poop to power a drill will fit in the comparable battery space.
So I think you;d be stuck "making" the low voltage DC "elsewhere" & supplying to the tool via a cord. Any appreciable power at lower volts require HIGH amps. High amps require BIG conductors to minimize voltage drop.
The whole battery thing works because of the asymmetric charge / discharge times & amperage demands.
btw I rigged up something like this to run my 12v Makita drill/drivers off my car battery but I had to use HEAVY cables (like good sized jumper cables). Working with them was like dragging a snake around with me. My light weight easy to use cordless drills were now less mobile than a corded 120v drill. :(
Good thing I made it out of stuff on hand & didn't buy the materials.
I think it is (was) a great idea.........but I couldn't get to work for me.
cheers Bob
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HeyBub wrote:

Why not use one of those old fashioned drills, you know, the ones you plug into the electrical outlet in the wall?
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Tony wrote:

Quiet. These guys are re-inventing those.
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Bob F wrote:

I hear they are having problems with the AC batteries.
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I think that will get rectified!
Main thing is how to safely get the voltage down from 115 to the 12 to 18 volts or so to operate the previously battery operated drill.
OR; use the truck battery arrangement at the work-bench as previously mentioned!
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Tony wrote:

Years ago, an electronics teacher I had, told a story about one of the many pranks electronics geeks will play on each other. I'm guilty of quite a few but the prank the teacher told about was brilliant. There is always some smart ass who tells the new guy to go get an AC battery off the shelf in the back. Well, it was pulled on a new guy who was fresh out of tech school and of course knew everything. Well, he was told that AC batteries were a new item and that there was one on the shelf. The skeptical young man went to the back and sure enough, there, on the shelf was an item labeled AC battery. He took it back into the shop and handed it to the senior tech while saying that they were pulling his leg. The prankster told the newbie to watch this. When the battery was connected to an oscilloscope, it displayed a nice little 1.5 volts peak to peak sine wave. The guys in the shop had installed a little battery powered oscillator inside the empty casing of a D cell. The old regular D cells were basically a zinc can with a carbon rod connected to the + contact and they were relatively easy to open up and clean out.
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

Good one! Especially the sine wave! We charged up caps to a couple hundred volts, threw them at the new guy and said catch.
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Tony wrote:

Let's see some of the pranks I would pull. In one shop where I worked, our workbenches had a master switch that we would flip on when we sat down to start our day of toil. #1, paint the guy's soldering iron with liquid flux then coat it with gun powder. #2, Take a bunch of 12volt miniature lamps and hook them to the 120volt power so that the sun came out when the victim flipped the master switch on his bench. #3, Swap the contents of the tuner wash and freeze spray cans. I would pull a vacuum on an empty can then connect them together with the plastic extension tubes and transfer the disparate content. The victim would get an unexpected result when trying to clean or cool something. #4, The old add a handful of extra hardware to the tray holding a disassembled item trick. There are many more pranks that a bunch of warped, bored, creative people would pull on each other.
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

About the spray cans, the freeze spray is expensive and canned air for blowing the dust out of computers is cheap, especially by the case. Just hold the can upside down and you have freeze spray. I also hook them together when a can of paint somehow lost most of it's pressure. Hook up a canned air can (upright) to the paint can and pressurize it again.
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Tony wrote:

I have several 20lb CO2 cylinders of the type used for soft drink dispensers that I use for cleaning and sometimes freezing things if I don't have any R22 at the time.
TDD
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