Stove faucet

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We're remodeling, and putting a water spray near the stove for filling up large vessels, and other times when water is needed at the stove.
Anyone know the proper terminology for these?
Anyone have one? Is it a snake type, or articulated?
Like them? Hate them? Caveats? Tips? Brand names suggestions?
Steve
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On Thu, 21 Oct 2010 13:11:35 -0700, "Steve B"

Do you have the wall open to run the necessary plumbing? I've seen one installed in a new construction home. Ken is a fireman and does the cooking in his house.
Maybe called a "potfiller", some are very expensive ($700.00). Yikes!
pic:
http://www.thedesignerkitchen.com/_images/faucets/pot_filler_faucet.jpg
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On 10/21/2010 1:11 PM Steve B spake thus:

A friend whose house I helped remodel installed one. Dunno what the official term is for these. His was a long upside-down "U" shape which swiveled, chrome. He was very happy he put it in. Every house should have one.
--
The fashion in killing has an insouciant, flirty style this spring,
with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.
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Steve B wrote the following:

If you had googled - stove faucet -, you would have gotten http://www.google.com/search?q=stove+faucet
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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I have used pot filler faucets in commercial kitchens, where in some cases they are extremely useful. I doubt they are worth the bother in a home kitchen.
These faucets normally are mounted high over the stove and swivel by at least 2 joints. They may also have a pull-out nozzle with trigger valve for one-hand operation. There is a risk of accident involving too much water spashing on a hot stove, and they have to be cleaned just about every time you use the stove.
If getting water from the sink to the stove is a problem, then won't it be a problem also getting a heavy pot from the stove to the sink?
At home I prefer to carry a pot or pitcher of water from the sink to the stove.
    Una
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I don't see the point, especially if you have a pull-down faucet at the sink that allows you to fill your pots on the countertop. Having a specialized pot filler is just another thing to break or leak.
It's about as silly as having a glass-filling faucet hanging over the dinner table. Using your legs for a few extra steps a few times a week won't hurt you.
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On Thu, 21 Oct 2010 16:00:31 -0700 (PDT), mike

There's lot of "accoutrements" with more downsides than upsides. But people that have them swear by them. One reason I prefer used Chevys over Buicks is the crap that usually comes with Buicks. Don't want power seats, heated seats, climate control, tire pressure monitors, etc. Just adds complexity, and expense if something goes wrong, which is about 99% of the time. But others eat that stuff up and brag about it.
My wife is a corporate cafeteria chef, and has faucets only over the steam kettles. They hold 50 gallons. But she quit using them long ago as they don't make sense for her cooking. She uses 10 gallon kettles on a stove. There's a sink next to the stove. She uses a gallon container to put what's needed in the kettles. She just smirked when I mentioned "stove faucets." Of course she measures the water used in most recipes. Hmmmm. Do stove faucets have water meters?
Yep, pretty silly to me and my professional chef who feeds 500 people, but those that have a stove faucet to feed a huge party of 40 once a year on Thanksgiving will surely swear by them. I don't begrudge them. Got nothing against the Stove Faucet Manufacturers of America Association either. To each his own. Hell, I don't even want an icemaker complicating my fridge. Never had a problem getting cubes from an ice tray.
--Vic
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I don't see the point, especially if you have a pull-down faucet at the sink that allows you to fill your pots on the countertop. Having a specialized pot filler is just another thing to break or leak.
It's about as silly as having a glass-filling faucet hanging over the dinner table. Using your legs for a few extra steps a few times a week won't hurt you.
*******************************************************************
I'm very happy you are fit and healthy. Many of us used to be, but as we get older, not as much.
While it is easy for you to carry a pot with 20 pounds of water from sink to stove, for someone with arthritis it may be impossible. It may also be very tiring for that person to take four or six pitchers to the sink also.
To answer the inevitable next question, once the pot is on the stove, no, it does not always have to be carried back to the sink. The water may now be soup and ladled out in small increments. Or the spouse of the cook is now home from work and can empty the pot.
As for using your legs for a few extra steps, if you get your head out of your ass long enough to look around, you will see there are people with only one or even no legs or legs that don't work so well.
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In a bad mood today, Ed?
I'm sure there are plenty of handicap accessories that don't belong in most kitchens. We're not discussing handicap kitchens.
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On 10/22/2010 11:07 AM mike spake thus:

We're also not discussing "most kitchens"; we're discussing the OP's kitchen. They asked us what we thought of having a pot-filler near the stove. A lot of us, myself included, think it's a dandy idea. You're free to disagree, of course. But in the end it's up to the OP as to whether it's worth installing.
--
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with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.
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If we're not discussing handicap kitchens, then aren't we discussing non-handicap kitchens, which are most kitchens?
I think I need to get my tooth extractor.
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On 10/22/2010 11:18 AM mike spake thus:

I have no idea. Do you know for a fact whether the OP is handicapped? I don't.
--
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with the flaunting of well-defined muscle, wrapped in flags.
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In a bad mood today, Ed?
I'm sure there are plenty of handicap accessories that don't belong in most kitchens. We're not discussing handicap kitchens.
*************************************************************************************
The OP may be smart enough to look into the future and realize someone my be less than physically perfect in a few years. While not needing "handicap" accessories, a few extra conveniences make life a lot easier as we get older.
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wrote in message

*************************************************************************************
I built a house in 1984. I told the framer to increase the width of the hall to 3/6", and the width of all bathroom, bedroom, and walk-in closet doors to 3-0. He asked why, and I said that we had someone in the family that was in a wheelchair.
Oh.
We didn't. When I went to sell the house, who comes to look at it?
You guessed it? They had passed on a dozen other houses because they were not handicap accessible. I did it to ADA before there was even an ADA. Well, maybe not, but I had never heard of ADA in 1984. Built it for $67k and sold it for $147 in six years.
Steve
Heart surgery pending? Read up and prepare. Learn how to care for a friend. http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
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wrote in message

In a bad mood today, Ed?
I'm sure there are plenty of handicap accessories that don't belong in most kitchens. We're not discussing handicap kitchens.
Reply:
I was in a sense. I'm permanently totally disabled, and even have a license plate to prove it. I'll use all the help wherever I can get it. And if it involves using a gadget that makes no sense to anyone else, I'll do that. Really, now, how many kitchen "gadgets" can you think of that are purely fluff, and one could do with a basic model, and some things that one could do without all together?
Steve
Heart surgery pending? Read up and prepare. Learn how to care for a friend. http://cabgbypasssurgery.com
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If we're talking ADA, then a pot filler faucet is out of the question, because out reach above and behind the stove. Instead, to get water from the sink to the stove I would use one of the "spring" coil hoses that are popular with animal owners and indoor gardeners. There are food grade versions on the market. They can be hung from the ceiling on a track like you see used for privacy room curtains in hospitals.
    Una
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== I have a name for them under the heading: UNNECESSARY fixtures for the home. ==
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=I have a name for them under the heading: UNNECESSARY fixtures for the home. = Another clueless #$%^^ Stop by a rehab center or senior center and ask the people there if they would like a pot filler.
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== Whatever you say Ed. For the majority of people a "pot filler" is just duplication of a facility already installed i.e. the kitchen sink. The OP didn't mention any handicaps or of being enfeebled or old. If one is so pressed for time that they need a "pot filler" above a stove and have the means or wish to impress others, let 'em go for it. ==
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/Stove-faucet-592015-.htm Nestor Kelebay wrote: Steve B:
This web site:
http://www.aaamasterservices.com/service/plumbing/contractor/faucet/kitchen_faucet.html
calls those things "pot filler" faucets, and says that they're often of an articulating design so that they can be folded flat against the wall when not in use.
While you can buy aftermarket parts from various suppliers for the most common faucets, you might have to go to the manufacturer to get replacement water seals in the articulating joints of those faucets, and they might prove to be exhorbitantly expensive.
You see, the manufacturer is going to take the view that the cost of repair parts should cover the entire cost of they're having to stock an inventory of repair parts for those comparitively rare faucets. And that cost won't just be the cost of manufacturing the repair parts, but will include the cost of doing an annual inventory, a fraction of the cost of the rent or property tax they pay on the warehouse they store those parts in, a fraction of the utility bills they have to pay on that warehouse, and a fraction of the salaries paid to warehouse employees. The manufacturer is going to reason that if the cost of the repair parts doesn't cover all of that, they're losing money by even offering repair parts to customers, and that the smarter strategy might be to market pot fillers made in China for $29.99 a pop, and not even bother with repair parts. That's a common theme nowadays.
So, before you commit to buying any manufacturer's "pot filler", you might want to phone the manufacturer's 1-800 customer service phone number and ask what they charge for a set of water seals for those nifty articulating joints. You may find out that replacements parts for such a comparitively rare faucet are exhorbitantly expensive. If so, that's another thing you have to weigh into your decision.
------------------------------------- ..in solidarity with the movement for change in Iran.
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