Storing Psint?

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I've never been happy with the way paint stores over a period of years.
Whenever I buy paint and store it, I'm always very meticulous about sealing the can, as well as wiping the lid and the groove for the lid. It seems like no matter what I do, paint always seems to eventually rust in the can or just plain dry up. I guess there's nothing that can be done about the "skin" that forms.
Does anyone have any new or different ideas or some creative ways to store paint for the long term??
Thanks!
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Dont, try to buy what you will need, save the mix information , brand, sheen information... then dispose of excess paint.
Jimmie
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I have 10 year old paint that's in perfect shape. What kind of paint do you typically guy?
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Some people have good luck with cleaning the lid groove well, tamping firmly in place and storing the can up side down. For oil based paints, a teaspoon of thinner or Floetrol on the surface will slow down the skinning over somewhat. HTH
Joe
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Don wrote:

Keep the rim clean so it doesn't get globbies that interfere with sealing. When I pour from the can, I line the rim with a strip of foil to keep it clean. When I seal the can, I smack it with a mallet at two or three spots around the rim. If the can is more than about half gone, I transfer the paint to another container (be sure to label it). I have paint that is probably 8-9 years old, still good. Always keep some rustoleum primer on hand.
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Store the paint can upside down. A skin may still form but chemical interaction of air and paint is reduced.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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Don wrote:

We used to use marbles to take up the volume in film developing chemical bottles. Maybe they'll work for paint cans.
Get your marbles here. $1.50 (or less) per pound.
http://www.mcgillswarehouse.com/groupslist.aspx?CategoryID 5&selection)
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HeyBub wrote:

I've heard about putting marbles in partially used bottles of wine, but never bothered to try it.
However, I did buy a Vacu Vin vacuum pump and several stoppers a couple of years ago and it sure seems to work as advertised.
http://www.beveragefactory.com/wine/preservation/blister.shtml
I'm not certain that a paint can would hold up to a hard vacuum even if you could figure out how to put some kind of valve in a punched hole to suck the air out through. I'm remembering the high school physics demo involving steam in a capped off rectangular gallon can collapsing the can when it condensed. <G>
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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jeff_wisnia wrote:

You can lay a layer of plastic wrap across the surface of the paint in the can - it effectively seals off the paint from the air in the can. Marbles? There are lots easier ways - old mayo jar comes to mind. Very old cans of paint will probably rust away before they dry up, esp. latex.
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Related story: I painted a client's front door with an old can of latex paint she provided. I gave it a good shake and stir, then started brushing. After a few minutes, I mentally kicked myself for dripping paint down the side of the can onto her concrete porch.
I picked up the can to find a big puddle underneath. The bottom of the can had rusted through in a pinhole, and the paint had cured around the leak, forming a scab. My mixing opened up the hole.
I asked the client to leave the puddle in place. Two weeks later, I peeled it off like a pancake. The only issue was that that spot on her porch was cleaner than the rest. :-)
Lesson learned: Set paint cans on the plastic lid of my tool caddy.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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Sounds familiar. Open a 5gal bucket of mudd and what's on top?
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On Sat, 02 May 2009 16:56:53 -0400, Don wrote:

The first thing I do when I open a new can of paint is poke holes with a sharpened # sixteen penny nail in a number of times in the bottom of the groove that the lid seals in to let paint drain back to the can when the lid is tapped back in place. I also blow my breath in the can before sealing.
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Could buy smaller empty cans, transfer paint so it's full, no O2 in the can.
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Storing Psint?:

1) clean can rim
2) put lid on can and tap around edge with hammer
3) put two small nail-holes in the top of the can just large enough to accept the tube from a can of "caned air" (compressed co2 that is used to blow dust off computer keyboards)
4) blow canned air into one of the holes in the lid, allowing it to escape from the other. Use enough co2 to purge the air space in the can
5) seal the two holes in the lid with a small amount of plumbers putty.
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Small jars with screw lid like mayonaise jars. Storing a can on concrete often leads to rust, Ive had a spray can rust away to nothing and a paint can, paint fell out when I picked it up.
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On the D.I.Y. channel they say to use Teflon tape on the threads of the jars (where the lid screws on). -- I don't understand why they make gourmet cat foods. I have known many cats in my life and none of them were gourmets. They were all gourmands!
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On Sat, 02 May 2009 19:18:24 -0400, jeff_wisnia

Wow! What a GREAT tip, very memorable!
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KLS wrote:

I'm waiting for one of our chemistry experts to weigh in on displacing air from a paint can....can't imagine any of the blowing/exhaust techniques make much difference in the amount of air in the closed can.
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People say paint "dries", but it actually "cures".
Sure, some paints dry; poster paint is an example. It's just colored stuff dissolved in water. When the water evaporates, the paint is dry. If you wet it again, it redissolves.
Paint for houses cures. Liquid chemicals in the paint combine with gaseous chemicals in the air, forming new solid chemicals that keep the colored bits in place. The gaseous chemical in the air is usually oxygen.
If you can get the oxygen out of the can, the paint at the surface won't cure. Auto exhaust will blow in lots of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide (along with other non-oxygen chemicals), blowing out most of the oxygen at the same time. Your breath will add carbon dioxide, displacing some (not all) of the oxygen. The various other canned gases mentioned will do the same thing, as long as they're not oxygen or some other gas that happens to react with the paint.
Here's a link to a general description of the various chemistries, if you want a better explanation: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paint#Binder_or_Vehicle
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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SteveBell wrote:

Paint isn't going to dry or cure until it gives off solvents. The chemistry I referred to - or, more accurately, the physics - of how much oxygen is actually displaced by the "blow in the can" method". My bet: not enough to matter, unless it is a very small volume of paint. In that case, a smaller container makes a lot more sense. Why leave a little bit of paint (of what use?) in a large can?
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