"steam" from chimney.

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Most people and dictionaries will flunk the physics, chemistry, and engineering tests about it also. You can join most people and dictionaries, or you can be correct.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Unless physicists talk in another language, the dictionary by definition is correct.
--
Thank you,



"Then said I, Wisdom [is] better than strength: nevertheless the poor
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They do, thank you.
http://www.answers.com/topic/steam In physical chemistry and in engineering, steam refers to vaporized water. It is a pure, invisible gas (for mist see below), which at standard atmospheric pressure has a temperature of around 100 degrees Celsius, and occupies about 1,600 times the volume of liquid water (steam can of course be much hotter than the boiling point of water; such steam is usually called superheated steam).
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

If this were a physics forum I wouldn't disagree.
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Thank you,



"Then said I, Wisdom [is] better than strength: nevertheless the poor
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You are wrong, natural gas and propane do NOT contain water or the pipes would have ice blocking the pipes where the water accumulates in cold weather. However both are hydrocarbons, they contain hydrogen and carbon. When burned with oxygen they form carbon dioxide and water (hydrogen oxide). It is this water vapour that you see condensing outside the furnace chimney or vent. This is the same process that forms condensation at your car's exhaust pipe or water dripping from the exhaust pipe and the con-trails that leave white streaks behind jet airplanes.
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EXT wrote:

While you are technically correct, I just wanted to note that as I read it he implied exactly that, i.e. when he referred first to combustion byproducts. The statement "gas contains moisture" is subject to interpretation :) Take everything in context. One might call this *latent moisture*. OTOH, there is some actual trace moisture present in the gas mixture even before combustion, so let's go ahead and dot some more i's while where at it. :) BTW, I have encountered frozen gas lines, FWIW. Not many, but a few.
Richard Perry

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Well........... being technically correct. With natural gas there are three types of gas used in old cities, primarily because of the presence of cast iron pipes that are sealed with oakum and lead the same way that cast iron drain pipes are sealed. Most areas with steel or plastic pipes are supplied with dry gas, any water in it will be accidental such as in new piping or where the line is punctured letting water in. Old areas are supplied with "humidified" gas where they add some steam to keep the oakum moist, or they add oil vapour to do the same job. In older cities you will see small iron fittings in the street or sidewalk that say "drip". These are not a comment on the local people but a low point in the underground piping where water or oil accumulates from condensing of the injected steam or oil. At regular intervals, the gas utility will access these drips to pump out excess water or oil.
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be
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EXT wrote:

    Wouldn't that be dihydrogen oxide? Hydrogen Oxide would be HO. Water is H2O.
    Bob
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Could be!!!!!!!!!!!!!

oxide).
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Ah, Ed. I'm disapointed. Of all the people who would know the diff between quotes and parenthases. But at least you didn't say "quote unquote" which many folks use incorrectly. A typical usage would be that the person said, quote unquote, you're fat. Now, in this usage, there is no quoted text.
Anyhow, (paranthetically), I think you're right about stem being invisible. And you can quote me as agreeing with you.
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Christopher A. Young
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A stem may be invisible, especially when it is encased in something like a gate valve, but steam is not always invisible.
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On 25 Jan 2006 18:09:26 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

What you see is not actually steam, but is a release, due to a bad connection, of leakage from the nuclear heater that is used in some new installations. Do not allow your children to go outside when it is visible, or for four hours afterwards.
Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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ah, but potassium iodate tablets will prevent absorption. Either that, or massive doeses of dihydrogen monoxide, orally, will prevent absorption. I'm never sure which.
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Christopher A. Young
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Humidifiers?
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CL Gilbert
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On 2006-01-25 21:09:26 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com said:

Stack temperature.
If your clay-lined stack is cool enough to condense the water vapor before it exits the chimney no "steam." If their metal stacks are hot enough to keep the exhaust temperature above the dew point until it gets outside then you have "steam."
(BTW, "steam" is an invisible gas. What you're seeing is water vapor...tiny droplets of liquid.)
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? wrote:

You made that up.
Richard Perry

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RP
The Colonel is correct. The products of combustion of gas (or any hudyocarbon) are Carbon Dioxide and WATER VAPOR. (With incomplete combustion you would also have some soot, which is unburned carbon, and some Carbon Monoxide, which is combustable.) If the stack temperature (flue temperature) is low enough, the Relative Humidity will hit 100%. That means some of the water vapor will condense into liquid water vapor droplets. This is what you see coming out of the chimney. If the flue gas is too hot, the water vapor will mix with the dry air outside before condensation can occ. Or if it occurs, the vapor clout will be so dilute you won't be able to see it.
Stretch
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To All,
Please excuse my mispelling of Hydrocarbon in my previous post.
Stretch
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Ok. I see I have created quite a war here. So why is it that My huge boiler puts out no vapour, steam, "cloud", but my neighbors wimpy water heater puts out a huge "cloud". Furthermore, lets say I like the cloud, what can I do to cause the cloud when I install a new water heater with b vent? What can be done to avoid the visible cloud with b vent on a cold day? Thanks
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Your huge heater is putting out the vapor, but it may be condensing inside the chimney and just dropping down to the ground inside. Most chimneys have a longer run than the high efficiency heaters that go out the side of the house.
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