Height of chimney above ridge?

I have, sadly, inherited a 16C thatched house in Devon. Listed building in conservation area. The place is generally in good order but the brick chimney stack is poor and the thatch needs a new ridge. The stack consists of two flues which emerge at the ridge. Both flues are used. My plan would be to have the stack rebuilt at the same time as thatching works are carried out. Flue liners and appropriate terminations would also be fitted. Probably next Spring. Last night I met with a local builder and a local thatcher, have known both for years. They are of good repute. They agree that the plan is sound. Builder said that the new stack would have to be 1.8m above the ridge. At present it is less than 1m. If this advice is correct the new stack would not be in keeping with (1) the building and (2) the locality. Does anyone know if this requirement would apply to a listed building in a conservation area? I've done a bit of googling this afternoon but am struggling to find what the exact requirements may be. Perhaps I should speak with a local BCO and English Heritage. I'm struggling. All help would be appreciated. Thanks, Nick.
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On 22/11/2013 18:15, Nick wrote:

You need to talk to your local planners or the Conservation Officer who have the responsibility for approving listed building consents. The good news is that there is no fee for making an application for listed building consent. Remember that making unauthorised alterations to a listed building is a criminal offence. Make friends with your CO as he can make things hell if you get on the wrong side of him or her. Whilst English Heritage will be consulted they are not usually interested unless the building is Grade 1 listed whereas yours will probably be Grade 2.
--
Peter Crosland

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On Friday 22 November 2013 18:27 Peter Crosland wrote in uk.d-i-y:

And in addition (and more importantly in terms of fire prevention) - I think this type of work *may* be notifiable to buiding control.
This is one case where a hundred quid or so (fee) to the building control dept will likely be very worthwhile in terms of on the spot expert advice from the building inspector who should have familiarity with thatched roofs.
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If the chimney works well, why bother increasing the height? May well need repair/upgrade Liners can only improve it. I seem to remember there are issues regarding fire resisting thatch. Some form of chemical treatment? Some form of spark arrestor for chimney?
http://uk.search.yahoo.com/search ;_ylt§x9QXl9oo9SYxEAD5RKBQx.?p=thatch%20chimney%20fires&fr=sfp
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writes

I doubt there is actually a requirement as such that you have to rebuild it that high (even if it might be so ona new build say), but it might be advisable in the builders eyes. It has survived all these years for starters :-) however, might be worth checking with BCO if it something they are bothered about
First stop should be your LA conservation Officer, listed buildings Dept, whatever they are called.
To change the stack you would need to get Listed Buildings Consent anyway, and whilst like for like repairs are allowed - for something like the thatch ridge I'd want to ok that with them as well. They will probably want to agree the material, maybe the style etc. (it's free to apply) but give them a ring/email first.
They will probably pop round and discuss it on site first. I'd imagine they have plenty of experience of dealing with thatch buildings in somewhere like Dorset
Despite the tales you hear , my dealings with our local ones have been fine.
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Chris French


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Sell it. Quickly.
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You interested in it perchance?....
Jim K
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On 22/11/2013 18:15, Nick wrote:

You'll probably find the insurance company require it.
Hope you get a better builder than us. When the immediate work is done I will tell the story here.
Andy
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Before spending anything on it, you might want to try and find an insurance company which will cover you for use of the flues on a thatched roof.
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Andrew Gabriel
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writes: <snipped>

Thanks Andrew, Current insurer is NFU. They are aware of both the thatch and the open fires. They have made stipulations regarding freqency of the chimneys being swept and submissions of certificates of such. Other than that, they don't have any problems with the arrangement. Rural area with many thatched buildings, I'm unaware of any locally that don't have some form of solid fuel heating. No mains gas and timber is plentiful. Nick.
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<snip> > You'll probably find the insurance company require it.

Thanks Andy, probably find insurance company require what? Sounds like you're having a problem with builders. Hope it goes ok for you but would be interested to hear the tale. Nick.
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