splicing a spliced cable line

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wrote:

Most likely, any amp will have one and only one output. If you see more, the amp is followed by a splitter.

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On 29 Nov 2006 13:20:49 -0800, " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

Your cable company will change out your splitter. Cheap is not better in this case. Something compatible with the cable company is best.

One splice is not terrible, the more you go the faster you will drop signal.
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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Compatible? This isn't an automobile engine being installed. It's just a lousy splitter!
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wrote:

Ain't it amazing how the nit-pickers crawl onto topics like this one?
A splitter is a low-cost experiment (with no dangerous side issues). Just try it!
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On Wed, 29 Nov 2006 17:34:55 -0500, "Charles Schuler"

Here is low-cost. Called the cable company and within an hour they arrived, replaced a problem splitter. No cost, gas, or nit-picking.
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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Did you make sure he used a compatible splitter? :-p
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On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 00:11:50 GMT, AZ Nomad

He did. And I greased his palm.
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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OK, if you have nothing against them messing with your system. This might be a problem if you have some special requirements (like an IR distribution system requiring DC bypasses around splitters).
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On Wed, 29 Nov 2006 22:30:55 GMT, AZ Nomad

I was amazed to learn a "dumb" splitter can go bad. Compatible, I mean what the cable company uses.
Put a lousy splitter on and they say; "the splitter is the problem".
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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Of course they say that. I have a digital cable Internet connection and when I call for service, the first words out of the technicians mouth are "Have you installed a splitter?" Fie on them!
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On Wed, 29 Nov 2006 18:00:21 -0500, "Charles Schuler"

I usually get something else from them, but it is a 'pat answer".
-- Oren
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My cable company has been happy to give me the appropriate splitter rather than me buying a rat-shack one. They don't like bad parts in their system. It can cause problems on your neighbor's reception.
Bob
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wrote:

As our cable company updated hardware... they came to my house when called. and up-dated a previous company splitter. I had it reduced from a 4-way to a 3-way. I can always add the 4th run in again, but not necessary now.
People think going to rat-shack for a "dumb passive device" is cheaper or best. No one has explained to my understanding how a "dumb passive device" fails; nor would I understand it.
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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Oren wrote:

Two "failure" modes, one representing a real failure:
The first possibility is you use a cheap splitter that is rated for say 500MHz. The cable company has been installing 1GHz rated splitters in preparation for their planned system upgrade. You splitter works ok now, but when the upgrade comes through the new channels are all snowy because your splitter can't pass the higher frequencies without excessive attenuation. This is not an actual failure, it's a mismatch between your older splitter and the newer cable system.
The second possibility is that a cheap splitter is built poorly, has bad solder connections, flux wasn't cleaned of the PC board, contacts weren't plated properly, etc. Over time the connections deteriorate and eventually fail. This is a real failure of the passive device.
Pete C.
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wrote:

Really the device has not failed; only limited by it's ability to pass the frequencies? (cable company)

I can see how quality assurance failure would make a dumb device "stupid".
Thank you...
-- Oren
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wrote:

I know the frequencies used for different channels (maybe not exactly, but close enough) and would consider that when buying a splitter.
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Mark Lloyd wrote:

Remember, there are more than just "channels" on the cable system. There is also data traffic for cable modems, the digital music channels, pay per view, etc. Find out what frequency the system is running up to and make sure the splitters are rated for that. 1 GHz would be typical these days.
Pete C.
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wrote:

Apparently, you've got a too-specific idea of what a "channel" is.

I do have cable internet. The downstream channel is on 99 (FM band, just below 14). The upstream channel is around T12 (3 channels below 2).
I don't have digital cable now, and might ask if I was getting that (although they do have too many relatively knowledge-free "customer service" people).
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wrote:

When there was a cable installer out here a few years ago, he gave me a splitter. Maybe that was the reason.
BTW, soon after that cable internet became available here.
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Charles Schuler wrote:

If you install a new (additional) splitter (before the cable modem) you attenuate both the upstream and downstream signals to/from it by 3.5db or more. A cable modem should be at the start of the system in your premises, ideally at a first two way splitter and any additional splits needed will be on the other output from that first split. This insures a maximum 3.5db attenuation from the cable drop.
It makes a difference - really, even bending the coax makes a difference.
Back when I worked for the cable company we took all the new installers into the converter and line gear repair room where we had a sweep tester. We would cut a fresh piece of coax from a spool, install F connectors on it and connect it to the sweep tester.
A sweep tester injects a test signal into the coax that sweeps from low frequency up to high frequency and it monitors this signal from the other end of the coax and displays a trace on the screen in real time showing the signal strength received. A nice 10' piece of coax gives a nice flat line normally.
After noting the flat line we would then start to flex the coax and start to kink it a little, squeeze it a bit with pliers and whatnot. The trace on the screen would go nuts showing all kinds of odd signal attenuation at different frequencies due to the cable damage.
This demonstration did a good job of convincing the new techs that the coax was not like an extension cord and damage to it made a real difference. They were much more careful to avoid damaging the coax when installing drops.
Pete C.
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