Sink pipe leaks.

The kitchen sink pipe drips a drop per hour. We'd called the plumber over and he replaced the sink funnel and drain pipe. It still drips. I noticed he put some gasket glue. But it appears to be leaking at the same area which is at the neck of the funnel (right below the bottom of the sink.) What could I do to solve this problem without calling the plumber.
Thanks
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He screwed it up.... he should fix it.

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sbcglobal.net : Sam Nickaby wrote:

I am not totally sure what the problem is, but off hand it does sound like the plumber did not find the real problem or he did not fix it. Give him a call. Tell him what is going on. Assuming he did not say something like "The work I did should fix it, but you really need to ......" and you did not do as he suggested, he may offer to come out and make his work good without charging. If he does, then make sure you keep his name and phone number handy for yourself and anyone who may ask you if you know a good plumber. He he does not want to cut you a deal, then, assuming there is nothing about this you did not tell us, then consider the cost a learning experience and start asking around for the name of a good plumber.
From your description, it may be the sink itself or a problem with one of the fittings of the U shaped pipe. That may be fixable by tightening the large nuts or replacing the washers and re-installing
You might want to stop by your local hardware store and pick up one of their DIY books for the homeowner. This kind of thing is difficult to explain without photos.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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sink funnel = sink strainer ?
he might not have tightened it enough. Try to tighten it. He should have used plumbers putty to make the seal with the bottom of sink. It is like play-dough kinda. This is an easy repair unless your sink is rotted. This is grounds for a free call back with me. I would not dream of charging you for this and would be very apologetic.
.

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[Repeating this post to: pdaxs.services.plumbing]
Hi, The leak is from the bottom part of sink strainer that goes into a compression coupling on the "drain pipe," after a closer examination. This (compression coupling) is very tight as it can't be hand twisted any further. I may wiggle the drain pipe (with my pinky) while someone is washing dishes and it will begin to drip faster. The strainer appears correctly installed with the "play doe" formula. The leak is coming from the compression coupling, as you call it, and I can collect half a cup while washing dishes. If I put silicone caulk then I might run into trouble the next time I remove the pipe. If silicone caulk is a good idea, I might try silicone caulk. Or ask the plumber to come back, if it's not out of line.
Sam
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Sounds like he screwed up. Try to take the nut off then put it back on. he might have cross threaded it or forgot to put washer in there.
wrote

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I thought I had the same problem at the compression joint. I was *wrong*
Turns out that the drop tube (connected to the drain with threads and then you connect the p trap to it) has threads that screw into the drain (threads on the top of this pipe). Those threads needed a turn of teflon tape and the dripping went away. the leak was so subtle that I too thought that the leak was coming from the ptrap fittings.
wrote

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This is a kitchen sink. The strainer usually has no threaded adapter, it uses a plastic washer different than a desanco washer. I have not seen a kitchen sink strainer that you thread the tailpiece into.

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Never worked in China..huh ?

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nope

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sbcglobal.net : Sam Nickaby wrote:

continuously, it probably isn't the drain, unless it's leaking from the bottom of the trap, where it would take quite a while to empty out the trap at one drop per hour.
When you say "neck of the funnel" do you mean where the drain basket contacts the sink proper or where the bottom part of that piece goes into a compression coupling on the "drain pipe".
Anyway, if it's definitely coming from something related to the drain, and not the supply, you could take things apart and apply some silicone caulk on the mating parts of each of the joints before reassembling them.
But if you happen to screw something up and then have to call the plumber it's going to COST you.
It may be better to call the plumber and tell him he didn't do the job right, even if it takes him a month to get around to coming back. At one drop per hour, you could put a drinking glass under that drip and it'd evaporate before the next drop fell. Plus, you may find that the drip stops by itself when enough detritus clogs it up.<G>
HTH,
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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Hi, The leak is from the bottom part of sink strainer that goes into a compression coupling on the "drain pipe," after a closer examination. This (compression coupling) is very tight as it can't be hand twisted any further. I may wiggle the drain pipe (with my pinky) while someone is washing dishes and it will begin to drip faster. The strainer appears correctly installed with the "play doe" formula. The leak is coming from the compression coupling, as you call it, and I can collect half a cup while washing dishes. If I put silicone caulk then I might run into trouble the next time I remove the pipe. If silicone caulk is a good idea, I might try silicone caulk. Or ask the plumber to come back, if it's not out of line.
Sam
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In my experience plumbers often don't tighten stuff enuf. Call him back.
wrote

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sbcglobal.net : Sam Nickaby wrote:

It should be "wrench tight", but sometimes the location and run of the drain pipe makes it difficult to get a good grip on the drain so you can wrench on the nit without fear of springing something "down the line". One of those rubber strap wrenches will grab the pipe firmly so you could wrench tighten the nut without fear, if you have one.
Silicone won't grab onto the metal hard enough to resist removal, but if you don't want to try that, unscrew and raise up the coupling nut and wrap a few turns of fairly heavy cotton string around the pipe below the nut, then tighten the nut back down again. That ought to do it without any fears of glueing the parts together.
HTH,
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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