Simple drywall/sheetrock question

We all know there are several thicknesses of drywall. What general applications are required for each thickness? Code? For example, if building a closet, other than the obvious thickness, is it acceptable to use 1/4" instead of 3/8' or 1/2" and vice versa?
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I don't know about code specifics, but generally 1/2" is used everywhere for ceilings, wall, closets, etc. If there are fire rating issues, for example, then thicker may be required. I would never use 1/4" for anything, unless it was absolutely necessary because of a critical space or similar issue. And even then, it better be a protected area, because 1/4" is flimsy.
I bought some 1/4" couple years ago for just such a need. As I recall, it was about the same price as 1/2" too, so you're not saving anything.
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wrote:

o

I have used 1/4" in 3 situations:
1 - The flat section of a ceiling over basement steps where the paint on the original plaster was so badly peeled that putting up a ~3' x 3' piece of 1/4" drywall and taping the corners was easier than trying to scrape and skimcoat the original ceiling. Glued and screwed.
2 - Similar situation for a bathroom ceiling with a flat section and a sloped section with a curved junction. Bending the 1/4" worked OK, but I smoothed out the curve with drywall compound. Glued and screwed. I had scraped and sanded the original plaster too many times to want to do it again. The drywall has held the paint for many years, something I can't say about the plaster.
3 - Same bathroom, small area above window. The walls in my house are 3/8" brown gypsum board coated with ~ 3/8" plaster. The area above the window continually peeling and the plaster was cracked. I used my HF Multi-Function tool tool to remove the plaster down to the wall board and then shimmed the area to accept the 1/4" drywall that I had left over from the staircase ceiling job. I might have tried 3/8", but I didn't have any 3/8" scraps so I used what I had available. Besides, with the shims, if was fairly easy to get the 1/4" drywall flush with the surrounding plaster.
I agree that it needs some sort of backing, 1/4" is too flimsy to be used by itself over a large area.

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to

Yes, good point. If it's going over existing to make a new finish, that makes sense too.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

It's good for curved surfaces. Put on one layer - wet if necessary - then another layer on top.
--

dadiOH
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hen

Couldn"t I accomplish the same thing by getting 1/2" drywall twice as wet? ;-)
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then

or make cuts on the backside to help it bend. Lots of cuts every half inch or so
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Well, around here, 5/8 is used for firestop, that is, a ceiling in a room below a bedroom.
Otherwise, 1/2 is the norm for almost everything.
I use 1/4 for making arches, such as arched doorways, because it is easier to bend, especially when wetted down.... If it seems too flimsy, just put another layer of 1/4 over the first.
I am not aware of the uses of 3/8...
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On 6/17/2013 7:35 AM, Robert wrote: ...

Find it in spec/low-end housing (as in cheap) simply for that reason. If building large spaces it can be a noticeable input cost differential to the developer.
Some will try it for ceilings for the weight -- w/ trusses (2x4 flat surfaces) the net span on 16" centers may be enough to keep bowing from being too excessive.
Otherwise, for OPs question, it would be a passable alternative for his proposed closets and other low-traffic areas for (as noted) minimal cost-savings.
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On Mon, 17 Jun 2013 05:35:44 -0700 (PDT), Robert

I've use it where I wanted the appearance of a drywall finish, but had no code or structural issues to be concerned about. Like a closet liner. Main advantage is ease of use with the low weight.
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