Shorten AC power cord???????

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I have a fairly new window AC with a GFIC shielded power cord made by Tower Mfg. part number 30386-0-LCDI.. I would really like to shorten the cord as it dangles where I don't want it to dangle. The connection at the control unit is a molded plug and it can not be shortened there.
The plug end is two piece molded and secured with screws, one of which is a security screw or I would have taken it apart already -:) for a look.
Anyone have any experience with these? Can they be shortened? Are the wires connected to the blades with a crimp or a solder? I can do either if I have to. I just hate to spend the time to find or make the security screwdriver to find out that it won't work.
Colbyt
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Why not just bundle it up neatly with a cable tie so it doesn't dangle and not tear apart something that they obviously are trying pretty hard to keep you out of? Besides, you might move the AC one day and then you may find the cord is 2" too short!
--

Mike S.

"Colbyt" < snipped-for-privacy@-SPAMBLOCK-lexkyweb.com> wrote in message
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Of course it can. Never mind trying to take apart the existing plug, just cut the cord to the length you want and put a new plug on the end. (Make sure you can find the correct plug before you cut the cord.)
Or you could just wrap the cord up, too.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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On Tue, 15 May 2007 08:22:28 -0400, "Colbyt"

AC cords are pretty thick, and there may not be room in the case, but you still may be able to stuff some of the cord back into the AC, especially if you take off the cover and can see where to put it. Then when you need it, you can just pull the cord out again.
This certainly works with a lot of things that use lamp cord.
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wrote:

Best idea so far on this!
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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I think so also. My first thought was to see if a shorter cord was available. Pulling the cord back into the unit makes sense.
-- Oren
"The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!"
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Tucking the cord back into the appliance makes sense if it will work in this application. I assume if it were that simple the OP would have just done that as opposed to posting here. If that will work, more power to the OP. If not, putting a new plug on is a very simple, neat & clean way to accomplish the goal of the OP.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It won't work. It's a molded strain relief.
Rob
I assume if it were that simple the OP would

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trainfan1 wrote:

So tuck the strain-relief in with the excess cord.
Jeeze!
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HeyBub wrote:

That would defeat the purpose & pose a safety issue.
Rob
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DUH,you add a new strain relief.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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trainfan1 wrote:

No it wouldn't. If the cord experiences a strain, the excess cord exits from the hole until it hits the strain relief. Besides, what's the use of a strain relief if there's no strain?
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wrote:

I "assumed" that if the OP thought of it in the first place, he wouldn't post here wanting ideas outside the box.
It was a good idea posted.
-- Oren
Hofstadter's Law - It [a task] always takes longer than you expect, even when you take into account Hofstadter's Law.
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Oren wrote:

It won't work. It's a molded strain relief.
Rob
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Jim Yanik wrote:

It won't work. It's a molded strain relief.
Rob
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wrote:

I suspect I could figure a way around that.
--
Jim Yanik
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mm wrote:

It won't work. It's a molded strain relief.
Rob
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Disregard any advice to cut the cord in the middle & crimp. Even with heat shrink tubing that would look less than ideal.
The easy & best solution is to replace the plug, cutting the wire down to the length you need. Be sure to measure carefully & allow some wire to be stripped & put into the plug. The wire may need to make a 180 degree turn @ the outlet to come in the bottom of the plug as well. Figure for that if needed. Personally I'd calculate what I need and then leave another 6-10" for wiggle room. You can make it shorter in a jiffy, making it longer is a project.
For simplicities sake, I'd just cut the plug & about 6" of wire off & take that to the electrical supply store. With the wire & old plug in hand choosing the right replacement would be a chinch, and then it's as simple as slapping the new plug onto the end of the wire. The end product will look as good as factory without splicing, soldering or shrink wrapping.
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Colbyt wrote:

Harbor Freight has a complete set of security bits in all sizes & configurations you'll most likely encounter. The whole kit is $2.50. At that price I bought two.
Bob
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The cord is not a GFI ,it is a LCDI as indicated by the part number.(LCDI) is a Leakage Current Detector Interrupter. Do not cut it out. It is there to prevent fire and to meet NEC and UL requirements effective August 2004.
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