short term temporary outside use of inside romex wire

I need to temporarily run a length of romex 6/2 with ground ( rated for inside use) across my flat roof.. I expect it'll be up there maybe two or three weeks. Is it o.k. as is...or should I run it in electrical pvc conduit to keep the sun off it while it is in temporary use ? (live in Phoenix...still about 98-103 during the days)
Thanks, Tim
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NM cable is not rated to be inside a conduit system. I ran my pool pump with 12-2 NM for a month while I got the new conduit run. As long as the 6 is enough for the load and distance.
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I'm just curious, and not meaning to start a flame war here, but where in the code does it prohibit romex to be in conduit. I remember threads in the past where this was discussed and I can't remember what the outcome was. Cheers, cc
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James Cubby Culbertson wrote:

Greetings,
a) Don't matter what the NEC says if your local inspector shoots it down.
b) As I understand it you can run Romex in conduit. I have run 100's of Romex wires inside conduit for additional physical protection. You just can't run it inside a "conduit system" which means conduit attached to a box at both ends or for extended lengths. You also must provide a large enough conduit to prevent overheating. I try to use 3/4" for a single 12-2 or 12-3 NM cable to be on the safe side.
c) Today I ran 2 12-2 NM's inside a single 1/2" piece of EMT for 8 feet with the yellow jacket stripped except for a few inches at the end for a clamp. It's safe but you might have someone complain because the wires inside NM don't have THHN written on them even though they are rated at 90-105C.
Hope this helps, William
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out all the code requirements is harder than the actual wiring of just about anything! I just ran some circuits in my garage and I spent more time thumbing through the code book looking for stuff than I did doing the actual work. Probably why Electrician's charge so much! Cheers, cc
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The problem with sleeving NM cable through metal conduit is that it's not bonded to the conduit and if it gets cut on the edge, the conduit could become live. One issue with running NM in a conduit system which would make it illegal is possibly the location of the conduit system. NM cable, like THHN wire are not for wet locations. Therefore running those inside a conduit system that is in a wet location, like underground would be illegal. There is however no reason not to sleeve NM through PVC in a dry location for added protection

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Wrong.
You keep saying that -- and I, and several others, keep asking you to cite the article of the Code that backs you up. You haven't -- because you can't. Fact is, the NEC _explicitly_permits_ the use of conduit to protect NM cable from physical damage.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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conductors are well insulated at the connection points, it'll be fine for a few weeks.
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TimR wrote:

It depends on whether you tell anyone or not. Seriously. (I would probably run aluminum triplex cable cuz it's cheap and it's designed for outdoor use -- but it's not really rated for this application either.)
Attach it with a plug instead of hardwiring it and it won't matter so much whether it meets code or not.
Best regards, Bob <-- not an electrician
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Why not an electrical cord? At least its protected for outside.
--

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Brian Dye
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Assuming the wire is the correct size for the load to be carried 30 days of fun and sun should be no problem. Does it meet any national or local codes? I doubt that it does. Exceptions to code are normally limited to 3 or 5 days when submitted by a licensed person.
--
Colbyt
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Just because your usage is temporary does not mean it is exempt from a safe and proper installation. The air temperature may be 98 -103, but the actual roof temperature could be a few hundred degrees. Running romex across a roof is definitely not a safe way to go. Without additional information as to what you are trying to accomplish, I cannot provide you with a solution that is viable.
John Grabowski http://www.mrelectrician.tv

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I don't know about 300+ degrees, but you can easily get spots that are hot enough to boil water.
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Well, it not "OKAY"
But I won't tell anyone.
Just wondering why you need such a heavy cable for only a "temporary" feed. ? Obviously this is for more than just using a skill saw, while you build a shed.
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