Sharpening knives

Page 2 of 2  
Dave wrote:

Everyone will tell you about stones. It is true but they require you to maintain a particulat angle of knife edge to stone (or use a gadget to do so). That is not an easy task without the gadget.
For you (and my wife and often me) the simplest, easiest thing is the sharpener that has two sets of steel wheels that rotate into a "V"...put knife edge into "V", apply a bit of pressure and pull; repeat as needed. They don't make a great edge but it will cut better than it did.
I Googled for an image...hard to believe but there is none. Used to be, nearly every home had one; they were the sort of thing you got at the dime store, lasted forever. This image is similar but the one I'm talking about has only one slot. This looks like it may have litle stones instead of steels. http://www.shopping.com/presto-presto-08851-dual-manual-knife-sharpener/info
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just send mine out about once a year and have them done professionally. Found a place online and I just mail them in. That's what most restaurants do.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Run a marker (Sharpie) down the edge. Practice removing the marker. In time you will be proficient at maintaining that edge.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You say to maintain a particular angle of edge, then recommend a gadget that does not have any control of angle. Those knife sharpeners you just recommended have ruined many knives.
Bob-tx
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob-tx wrote:

Yes they do, the wheels provide an angle, all you have to do is hold the kife so the blade is vertical. Most people can manage "vertical" but would have trouble with "30 degrees".

Not mine. And the fact remains that they *do* sharpen and are easy to use. OP characterized himself as "clueless" so they seemed a reasonable suggestion. They still do.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And, if you know anything about knives, you know they remove waaaaay more metal than is necessary to just sharpen the knife, shortening the life and looks of the knife. It is very easy to take away the profile of a knife with these by pausing a little too long in one spot.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve B wrote:

The metal removed is directly proportional to the pressure exerted and the number of times the blade is drawn through the wheels.
NOTE: I did *NOT* say these were great knife sharpeners. I said they were easy to use and do sharpen. Both are true. I do agree that one can sharpen better in other ways; however, considering the condition of most kitchen knives - won't cut butter, rivets gone, etc. - I also think these are useful.
BTW, I've used straight razors for close to 60 years...I do know how to get and maintain an edge.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Since most people have on average ONE sharp knife in their kitchen, it doesn't really make much difference. I have built a collection of fine knives over the years, many for a quarter to a few bucks at yard sales. I need to add another 24" magnetic bar because the one I have won't hold all of my knives.
I USED to keep two sharp knives for SWMBO, but was frustrated when I needed a good one. So, I sharpened ALL of them, and keep them sharp. She has learned all on her own, and at her own learning curve just what a sharp knife will do to anything in its path. She has also learned how to handle knives a LOT better, and I get comments from guests who use the knives. I always caution them that the knives are sharp, and they give me the duh look. Then they use it, and say man, this IS sharp.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bob-tx" <No Spam no contact> wrote

I have seen MANY knives at yard sales that look like they were sharpened to death. Many of those who have electric sharpeners have no idea how to use them, don't understand how they work, and think that they need to draw it through ten or twelve times for it to be sure to have a good edge. I can sharpen mine in a couple of minutes, then steel it, and it's very sharp. Also, lots of people INSIST, GODDAM IT! on using glass cutting boards because they read somewhere or heard on Oprah that the wood and plastic harbor germs. Bullshit. Keep it clean and maintained, and they're good to go. And then, on most of those people who are anal about the cutting boards use sponges and those scrubby things on a handle that they use far far beyond their intended lifetime, sometimes until being totally shredded, and absolutely filthy. Mythbusters did a germ count segment. The dirtiest thing in your kitchen, by a factor of about 5x is the sponges and scrubbies. You know, the 2 for a buck at the dollar store ones that people use for six months? Ruin your $100 Henckels knife on a glass board, but save fifty cents by using a scrubbie until it disintegrates. Whatever works for you.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/27/2011 6:41 AM, dadiOH wrote:

On good forged steel knives I've found most of those devices useless. They may work on cheap knives that most people have though. I use a fine grinding wheel and a guide to sharpen mine but I rarely use it. A few swipes on a steel brings the edge back on a good knife like forged Henckels or Wusthof. I never got that good at using a stone.
The sharpener I use looks like this:
http://www.edistiller.com/prodImages/medium/76278.gif
I think I got it at Costco. I can get the forged steel heel in the guide and that's usually a problem with sharpening quality knives. If you don't sharpen the heel it becomes a bump and the knife becomes worthless.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/26/2011 11:16 PM, Dave wrote:

I just got this from Amazon, $27.50 not including shipping:
Presto Pro EverSharp Electric Knife Sharpener
Bought it to replace an older type, more expensive, diamond sharpener which was breaking down. It does just as good a job.
For my hunting knives I have a ceramic stick type sharpener to maintain edges sharp enough to shave with.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

EZ Lap. Diamond dust stones. If you can learn what the proper degree angle looks like, you can sharpen a knife in a minute. I got a new one last Christmas to replace my other that wore out. I purchased that one in 1976. I like the one that is about 2 X 6 inches. ($23) You can use it by rubbing the knife on it, or taking it in your hand and stroking the stationary knife. The double sided folding one is a good one, too. Knife sharpening isn't rocket surgery, the angle being the critical thing, and the type of sharpener you have dictates how much you have to work on it.
http://kennesawcutlery.com/Sharpeners/Eze-Lap-Sharpeners?sourcecode=GOKCNB&gclid=CNSVlZTQvasCFQl1gwodH1STuQ
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Try this:
http://basicallyknives.com/product_info.php?products_id 2
about $2 at Wal-Mart in the sporting goods section. One side has a carbide "V", the other side has a ceramic "V" for coarse and fine sharpening. Easy. There may be better sharpening techniques but I find this to be good enough for kitchen knives.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

Try this. It maintains the proper edge angle for most knives:
(Amazon.com product link shortened) A4
YouTube Video of the system in use:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KW64B0MZVOE

I use it on all my custom knives and straight razors, plus our kitchen cutlery.
Frank
--
Here's some of my work:
http://www.sharpbywarner.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

<Snip>
That gadget - what a piece of crap! Get a couple good stones (soft and a hard), and learn to sharpen a knife right.
Bob-tx
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 15 Oct 2011 19:54:10 -0700, Frank J Warner

The blade holder in that kit looks useful.
The Link in your sig 404'd.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/26/2011 11:16 PM, Dave wrote:

There are a number of videos on youtube about this, including one specifically for pocket knives.
There are a variety of techniques, but the take-home messages seem to be: 1. Be consistent with lubricant (always water or oil). 2. Be consistent with stroking technique (same direction, alternating from side to side). 3. As you finish, let the weight of the knife apply the pressure. In other words, don't press too hard.
None of the five videos I watched said anything about cleaning old stones. I have a Craftsman combination stone that must be at least 30 years old. Due to all the buildup of oil in the pores, neither side felt particularly gritty. Using dish detergent and a tooth brush, I thoroughly cleaned both sides. Now I can feel the grittiness, and from now on I'll just water as the lube.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

buy some diamond honing plates; Harbor Freight sells a multi-sided diamond honing block that uses water for lubrication/cutting fluid. Or you can use a flat surface like a glass plate or MDF and silicon carbide wet-or-dry sandpaper.use grits of 250 and 600 or more. Google "scary sharp" for more info.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.