Sharpening Garden Shears

If garden shears have not been sharpened for a long time, does it require specialized sharpening tools by a professional to bring the blade back into shape.
I bought and used a hand file until my hand has become bloody but the blade is as dull as when I began. Thank You, Mary
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Mary Lou wrote:

Scissor type or anvil type? With scissor type, more than the edge matters- the pivot point and any bending to the blade, can make a big difference. If blades are bent or joint gets sloppy, the cutting edges won't pass over each other correctly, and it gets very frustrating to use.
I'd call local sharpening shop and ask how much they charge. Garden shears aren't that expensive, and replacement may be cheaper. Or if you buy the same style, comparing the new ones to what you have may give you the needed understanding to make the old ones work.
aem sends...
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On Mar 11, 6:34 pm, Windswept@Home (Mary Lou) wrote:

If your shears are by-pass (scissor) type, all you need to do to sharpen them is disassemble them & burnish or polish them on sandpaper backed up by a very flat surface.
The leading edge of the "sharp" jaw can be filed to knife edge.
If they are hand shears they are easier to deal with than loppers.
cheers Bob
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How do you get you hand bloody by using a hand file? Did you hold the shears on a bench vice?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ufx0-DHaamQ


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GgD2O6yj7yM

You should be able to do the same with a hand file, just much slower process.
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Unless you know what you are doing, trying to sharpen shears or scissors can actually ruin them. My wife got industrious once and tried to sharpen some scissors; she ended up with both sides of the blade beveled, sort of, and they never cut again.
A file is not the best tool for this, but a decent job can be done with a file. An adjustable wrench is also handy for disassembling and tightening, and a hammer can often straighten out a bent blade, but I prefer to get a new set rather than trying to straighten a bent blade. If you have someone who knows how to sharpen them, ask for help and instructions. If not, many fabric stores have a sharpener who comes around perhaps monthly; find one and watch what he does. Let him think he is dazzling you and you should be able to steal his secrets.
Mary Lou wrote:

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