Set fence post in concrete, dirt, or gravel?

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Sure is. I've lived in my house for 20 years- and I've been on Usenet for 11. I hope I live to be 100 so I can see whether the road out front goes 4-lane, or Usenet dies first. Both have been 'imminent' since I've known them.
Jim [I had to search googlegroups for "death of usenet" -- It was being predicted in 1985- http://groups.google.com/group/net.news.group/browse_frm/thread/aefee869719962fe/f5c09956ca0e173d?lnk=st&q=%22death+of+usenet%22&rnum=1&hl=en#f5c09956ca0e173d
Joked about as "the imminent death of Usenet" by 1989- http://groups.google.com/group/news.misc/browse_frm/thread/13d8316a056830e/51a511a8f54861ce?lnk=st&q=%22imminent+death+of+usenet%22&rnum=5&hl=en#51a511a8f54861ce and became the acronym IDOUP by the end of the year http://groups.google.com/group/news.groups/browse_frm/thread/a8672deee3309d31/24425f11a549be06?lnk=st&q=IDOUP&rnum=3&hl=en#24425f11a549be06
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Jim Elbrecht wrote:

so why did google get on the wagon?
why does any decent isp even have a news server
my guess is that usage is up! up because more are learning about it
usenet started when most people didn't even own a computer, how can it be fading?
you should post some statistics...
if you're referring to the old days and you don't see the familiar names you used to... that's one thing.. that's not fading, those people just died! lmao ' post some stats!
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It is. I think the younger generation is not as usenet savvy as some of use...older...folks.
How old are people here? I'm 46 and been online for about 22 years since I bought a 300 baud modem and discovered BBS's.
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Ook wrote:

damn your old
im only 8 years old, what is a bbs?
are you going to build you fence today? You are going to get tired quick.
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"Ook" <Ook Don't send me any freakin' spam at zootal dot com delete the Don't send me any freakin' spam> wrote in message

Anyone who's been around this newsgroup for a while would remember when a thread like this one (the original thread - about fence posts) would have gotten a very authoritative response from Bikerbabe in Black Leather, which would then have brought on a response from some clueless n00bie entertaining the rest of us with something like "Hey Bikerbabe. I can tell you're my type. Maybe we could get together for a couple drinks, followed by Bikerbabe saying "I really don't think I'm your type." and then a few more posts debating the point. Yes ... those were the days.
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Ook wrote:

Metal posts in concrete will last indefinitely (or 75 years, whichever comes first). Mine have lasted 42 years and they make even better metal posts today than they did in the '60s.
1. Dig hole (it can be a lot smaller than if you were using 4x4). 2. Put a rock in bottom. 3. Set post in hole - make it straight. 4. Fill hole with water. 5. Slowly dump in a bag of concrete. 6. Repeat steps 1-5 for each post.
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here in london u.k. we have things called met posts. metal spikes that you bolt the post into. they seem to work fine for me. see illustration http://www.fencingtrade.co.uk/acatalog/Kwik_Posts.html
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Ook <Ook Don't send me any freakin' spam at zootal dot com delete the Don't send me any freakin' spam> wrote:

<...snipped...>
Different types of soil and climate may produce different results. That said, my experience in the Baltimore Md area, is that a CCA PT 4X4 will last AT LEADT 20 years directly in the ground, and in fact at this age they appear to have plenty of life left. (I recently pulled some up that were about 20 years old; I needed to set new, deeper posts because I was replacing a 4 ft fence with a 6 foot fence.)
In fact, the posts will outlast 2 or 3 sets of cedar pickets. The soil that these posts were set in is soft for the first 8 inches or so, then becomes pretty hard, hitting clay at about 2 feet down. I put a few inches of gravel in the bottom of each hole. YMMV. I've seen lots of recommendations to avoid setting posts in concrete, claiming they would rot faster than when set directly in soil. Whethere that's true or not, I don't know, but with the life of a typical PT post set directly in the ground, it certainly is not necessary.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Fri, 01 Sep 2006 20:23:42 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net () wrote:

It depends on the density of the CCA treating. Some BORG junk is only 0.25 CCA. That is just a green wash. You can get it up to 2.50 CCA that they use in salt water here in Florida. That would last forever in northern dirt and a half a century here. Typical "direct burial" rated posts are 0.80 here but I have some that were 0.40 and listed that way. I got about 10 years out of them.
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Ook wrote:

Lots of great ideas here, but here's a couple more. In the countryside around here we have the occasional redwood fence posts with barbed wire. Redwood lasts a very long time, but the reason they still stand is due not to concrete but shale that's driven alongside the footer. When I reconstructed a fence along part of our property, I pulled out a couple misplaced treated 4x4 posts, and the part that was in the ground was as good as new. 40%copper pressure treated posts last a long time, and look better than steel or vinyl posts, in my opinion. I agree that concrete is so permanent to be a nuisance around the property. But, it does hold posts well and the post won't rot if the very bottom isn't sitting in a bucket of water soaked concrete. I didn't want to spend too much money on concrete, so I combined the pounding of shale and other flat rocks at the foot to make the post tight, and then at the top of the whole, I filled in a bit of concrete and mounded it a little so that dripping rain drains away from the post. Posts can support each other, so I used galvanized metal brackets to hold the cross supports between each pair of posts (set 8 feet apart), 2x4s set on edge, rather than flat, so that I wouldn't have the saggy look so common on fences in my area. These cross supports were 10%copper pressure treated posts, cheap and available at Home Depot, so I used 3 cross supports, rather than two. The top plate connecting across posts were 20ft long 2x6 redwood, and the visible lumber used was carefully sorted for heartwood 7/8"x5 redwood planks found also at Home Depot. I cut off the dog ears and put the edges under the overhang of the top plate. I drilled and used screws, not nails, which takes a little longer to put up, but results in fewer split boards and an overall stronger fence. Along the bottom at dirt level, I linked posts with 1x12 redwood as a kickplate, filling whatever holes with spare rocks to keep the dogs in the yard. Later, I decided that the southern exposure of the fence would look good with grape vines, but I wanted to make sure the fence would suffer from the extra weight, so I drove 2x2 grape stakes every 4 feet, and anchored with screws to the existing fence at the post, and half-way between, and then put half-way up and just under the top plate, horizontal 2x2s to tie across and create an easy access trellis to tie on the vines, which are spaced every 4'. Ultimately, because the vines are away from the wood, and well pruned of foilage and excess wood in winter, they will actually provide additional wind resistence for the fence by their root strength. In summer, the foliage shades the wood, reducing exposure to the harmful effects of UV rays that will over many years will split up even good redwood planking. Anyway, this is the story of a 100' section of fencing on my property. Incidentally, I like the grey color of weathered redwood, so I wouldn't bother to stain or paint the fence. I don't want the extra maintenance.
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Ook,
FWIW, on an old episode of This Old House they buried composite post "anchors" in the ground, which in turn had a PVC sleeve inserted into them along with a 1" diameter piece of rebar that was long enough to stick up above ground level. Each wooden fence post had a hole bored into its end and was placed over the top of the protruding rebar. This way the posts were never in contact with the ground.
When I tried to find out further information about these composite post "anchors", all that I could turn up was that Walpole Woodworkers had something to do with them. Not much info on their website and I never did get around to actually visiting one of their locations to see if these items were available.
It seems like a viable system to me. If so, it may help put an end to the constant debate of whether or not to use cement when installing fence posts.
Anyone else, have any info on these? Please post it here for all to share. TIA. HTH.
Peter.
"Ook" <Ook Don't send me any freakin' spam at zootal dot com delete the Don't send me any freakin' spam> wrote in message

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Ook wrote:

Hi, I only use cedar or treated wood post. Gravel at bottom, pack with dirt and make a dome around post at the top. Lasts LONG time.
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what percentage of the post is in the soil? 25%, 30% ??
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