Self-limiting washer hoses

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At HD the other day I picked up two stainless braided washer hoses labelled "Floodsafe." The package says "sutomatic senses hose ruptures and shuts the water supply off when then flow of water exceed the design rate.
Has anyone used these and/or any like this? Pros? Cons?
Does it restrict the flow into the machine enough to make the wash cycle longer as the fill time increases? I found their website:
http://www.watts.com/pro/whatsnew/whatsnew_floodsafe.asp
but I'd rather hear from actual users . . .
TIA,
-- Bobby G.
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waste of money, a partial leak will still flood your home. plus people have complained about longer cycle time
if your concerned get a auto solenoid valve and forget about it....
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: ...

What's the input for the solenoid?
--


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water sensor on the floor under the washer.
I always shut off the stop valves for the washer when I'm not using it; that way the only time I have to worry about a failure is when the washer is actually running. some people say that that makes the hoses last longer too but I can't see how that could be as they will still be pressurized unless your solenoid valves in the washer are leaky
nate
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N8N wrote:

...
precisely the point...got's ta haf somethink besides just a valve...
--
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I'm pretty sure I've seen ones that have an AC current flow sensor that detects when the washing machine is on and uses that to activate the water flow solenoid. I think they plug into the wall receptacle and then the washer plugs into it.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote: ...

Hmmm....they would have to be pretty sensitive for my washer which begins fill before anything other than that solenoid is powered...possible, but surely not a lot of current there...
--
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they are very sensitive, modern electronics and all.
it detects a minor current draw, under 1/8 of a amp.
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wrote:

<<I'm pretty sure I've seen ones that have an AC current flow sensor that detects when the washing machine is on and uses that to activate the water flow solenoid. I think they plug into the wall receptacle and then the washer plugs into it.>>
Yes, I've seen those, but they're in the $100+ range unlike these hoses. (-: I've got a whole-house water shutoff, but I had a rupture that sprayed considerable water upwards before the sensor activated. I thought these hoses might constitute a second, quicker acting line of defense than a sensor and a solenoid valve.
-- Bobby G.
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it detects the washer drawing power.
ideally you also have a washing mchine drain pan.
if we ever get a upstairs laundry room the room will have a central floor drain in case anything leaks.
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wrote:

labelled
the
<<waste of money, a partial leak will still flood your home. plus people have complained about longer cycle time
if your concerned get a auto solenoid valve and forget about it....:>>
Some people have reported problems within this thread so I think I might skip them since they are hard to reach to install. The last thing I want to do is go in there after them.
Thanks
-- Bobby G.
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I have had them on for a couple years now. Doesn't affect anything; I don't use it, but my wife would sure as hell complain if anything took longer.
Don't know if they actually work, as leaks are pretty rare.
I have had two problems with the washing machine; the drain clogged and the water level sensor clogged, causing minor floods each time. As such I would really like a whole house solenoid (water heater, washing machine, etc.) but the main valve and PRV are immediately before the first branch, so there is no place to put it.
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don't
That's interesting. They are hard to reach and install, and I would rather not have to do it if they are going to be a problem to deal with and might have to come out if they don't work well.

That's the second problem. Aside from deliberately overpressurizing them (and I have no idea how I'd do that) it's a matter of trust in the manufacturer's claims.

the
would
but
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That's too bad. I found one that had a 3/4" compression fitting so even a bad solderer could install one with a couple of huge wrenches and a tubing cutter. I assume there's not enough pipe coming out of the wall to insert to the valve. I had about a 2 foot run of copper pipe from the wall to the main valve (no pressure reducer that I can see) so it was a snap.
-- Bobby G.
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I tried to use those auto-shut-off water-hoses from HomeDepot in my washing machine. But I had to return them because they were very frustrating to use. They didn't cause trouble when both hot and cold water are running to fill the washing machine with warm water. But the waster hose in the cold water supply immediately shut off the water flow when the washing machine started the rinse cycle that needed cold water (and didn't need the hot water). The only way to get water flowing is to disconnect the water hose from the cold water supply and re-connect it -- this is a pain. The only way to get them to work peacefully with my washing machine was to turn the valve in the water supply to something like half. Obviously, this increased the time in washing cloth. I have a feeling that when we ran the cold water supply in full open, the water flow was strong enough to trigger the water hose to shut off.
I ended up returning them and placing a battery powered water sensor on the floor near the washing machine. It will make loud noise if it detects water. This means someone must stay home when we use the washing machine. This is OK with us.
Auto-shut-off water hoses are probably OK to use under a sink where we don't want water to run in full force and have over-spray all over the place. However they may not be suitable in areas where we expect to run water in full force like in a washing machine. Actually, I may even want to install them under the utility sinks in the basement. In other words, they will have their places in my house, just not in my washing machine.
Hope this helps.
Jay Chan
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I just bought one of these hoses for my ice maker. Never even knew they existed. Since it was about the same price as either copper tubing or a regular braided hose, seems like it can't hurt.
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<stuff snipped>
<<I just bought one of these hoses for my ice maker. Never even knew they existed. Since it was about the same price as either copper tubing or a regular braided hose, seems like it can't hurt.>>
They're probably best suited to something like an icemaker where flow rate is minimal to begin with. The price, as you point out, was right. In fact, it was so right, I didn't even notice these had the rupture protector until I opened the bag!
-- Bobby G.
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wrote:

labelled
the
<<I tried to use those auto-shut-off water-hoses from HomeDepot in my washing machine. But I had to return them because they were very frustrating to use. They didn't cause trouble when both hot and cold water are running to fill the washing machine with warm water. But the waster hose in the cold water supply immediately shut off the water flow when the washing machine started the rinse cycle that needed cold water (and didn't need the hot water). The only way to get water flowing is to disconnect the water hose from the cold water supply and re-connect it -- this is a pain. The only way to get them to work peacefully with my washing machine was to turn the valve in the water supply to something like half. Obviously, this increased the time in washing cloth. I have a feeling that when we ran the cold water supply in full open, the water flow was strong enough to trigger the water hose to shut off.>>
That sounds like a good analysis of the problem. We often use either all hot or all cold water for washing or rinsing, so we're very likely candidates to experience the failure mode you've described. Lengthening the fill time is tolerable as long as it isn't too long. Careful adjustment of the supply valves might overcome the "shutdown on cold/hot only" problem but that's a bit of pain.

I bought a couple of them for backup sensing for the main water shutoff. Not loud enough to save the basement if the hose ruptures when I am mowing the lawn.
<<Auto-shut-off water hoses are probably OK to use under a sink where we don't want water to run in full force and have over-spray all over the place. However they may not be suitable in areas where we expect to run water in full force like in a washing machine. Actually, I may even want to install them under the utility sinks in the basement. In other words, they will have their places in my house, just not in my washing machine. >>
I didn't even think of using them elsewhere. Good idea.

Yes, thanks!
-- Bobby G.
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I am not sure if using hot-water-only will trigger this problem or not. Never try.

Actually, it is probably more useful for a sink in an upstair bathroom than for a washing machine. If a water supply hose in upstair bathroom ruptures, it will send a lot of water going down the floor to the ceiling downstair and onto the basement. It will cause a lot more damage than just the basement if you are not at home. Now I think about this, I may go out and buy some for myself.
Jay Chan
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I tried the "Floodsafe" toilet supply lines because it sounded like a good idea. Unfortunately the only way I could get them to work was to choke down the supply valve so far down that it took over five minutes for the toilet to refill. Normal flow into the toilet would shut off the water supply instantaneously. I have heard similar stories so I won't be buying anymore until the bugs get worked out.
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<stuff snipped>
<<I tried the "Floodsafe" toilet supply lines because it sounded like a good idea. Unfortunately the only way I could get them to work was to choke down the supply valve so far down that it took over five minutes for the toilet to refill. Normal flow into the toilet would shut off the water supply instantaneously. I have heard similar stories so I won't be buying anymore until the bugs get worked out.>>
Hmmmm. I really don't want to dramatically lengthen the time it takes to fill the washing machine. I guess I am going to have to hook them up and see what happens. I also don't want the solution to be worse than the cure, i.e. having to uncouple the hoses each time they get "locked up." I get enough of that crap from my PC!
-- Bobby G.
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