Second Floor Laundry Room

Page 2 of 2  

On Sat, 20 Feb 2010 08:54:59 -0800, Daniel Prince

Gravity will keep water in the trap. For a washer you'll need an air admittance valve beside the stand pipe if the waste water has a long route to the main soil pipe tree. This allows air to be sucked along with the washer water letting it flow smoothly so it doesn't make noise when gravity accelerates it down from the second floor.
http://www.toolbase.org/Technology-Inventory/Plumbing/air-admittance-valves
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jeff The Drunk wrote:

I did not know that gravity will keep water from evaporating over time. Most drains are used every day. A floor drain might not be used for years. -- I don't understand why they make gourmet cat foods. I have known many cats in my life and none of them were gourmets. They were all gourmands!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have heard of people pouring a small amount of oil into the drain-- not sure if it was cooking oil or mineral (motor) oil, or if it would matter which. This would be especially for drains that are not that easily accessable. Otherwise, if the drain is easy to get to, and gets no normal use, just pour some water into it periodically. Water evaporates- things like that are just part of maintainance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 21 Feb 2010 05:41:42 -0800, Daniel Prince

I didn't say that gravity would keep water from evaporating. I recommend that you take a piss in the floor drain once a date to make up for evaporation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Deano wrote:

Stick the drain pipe for tub right out through the wall on the second floor. Let it drain outside. After all, how often are you going to have a failure if at all?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When I was in Europe I saw laundry closets lined with the vinyl flooring. The material was folded up the wall for a few inches and the corners sealed with vinyl "caulk" that formed what appeared to be a weld. I even saw showers built like this. I haven't seen a material like this in the states. I know nothing about this material but it seemed ample for the job at hand.
Jimmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Deano wrote:

They sell plastic pans with sensors and pumps (similar to a/c condensate/humidifer pumps), that lift any leaked water up into the drain standpipe the washer uses. They also sell auto-shutoffs for the supply valves, in case a hose breaks. Both recommended for second floor laundries. TOH website probably has a link to brand names- they have featured them on their shows multiple times.
Other thought- it does freeze in Cincy in winter, sometimes. Make sure the eave you are using, and the route the supply lines and drain use, are not subject to icing. I would not tightly enclose the washer/drier- makes service a major PITA. You need some place to fold and put clothes on hangers. A hanging bar and big table within 6-8 feet would make laundry duty a lot easier. I have seen living-area laundries combined with playrooms and sewing rooms and such, or even a den/guest room.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.