Sealing peeling paint??

Plan on repainting the ceiling in the kitchen. The paint is about 25 years old and starting to peel in a few spots. My question is if I fill the peeled area with joint compound and paint the entire ceiling am I going to have to worry about other sections peeling from underneath the new paint and ruining it? Is the some type of sealer to prevent this?
Thanks for any input. JRE
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Get a one inch puddy knife and to remove the paint. BUT FIRST:
I would wear an respirator with lead protection qualities and put a big fan in the window to help remove dust. Open a window somewhere else to create a draft. Also buy cheap plastic sheet drop cloth so when it falls to the ground, you can easily dispose of the mess. You will have a mess. Don't let anyone but yourself to enter the room unless protected. Have a shop vac with a extra hose for exhaust and hang it out the window when vacuuming. Use a damp towel to get fine particules after all is done.
You should wash the ceiling to get any previously painted over grease off the remaining ceiling. Then try smooth the ceiling use drywall compound to match existing solid painted surface. That's what I did. A ha.

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Do you mean remove it all?? or just at the areas that are peeling.
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I don't know. I took off, peeling, about about four sq ft on my ceiling. You can't tell how easy it will be by looking at it. Only when you start will you know the extent of the peeling.

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Mastermech wrote:

No you don't have to remove anything that isn't loose. Putting something over the loose part won't make it stick tighter. So you need to lightly scrape all over to test for looseness and where you find it scrape harder to remove the loose paint. Then wash lightly and put undercoat on the scraped areas to build those area up level with the unscraped part and then put another coat on all of the ceiling. Then paint normally.
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Quit trying to be lazy and do it the right way - remove all the old paint. It's going to peel off eventually.
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fan
If the paint is 25 years old that is after lead paint. Scrape any loose paint and sand the edges lightly. Wash down with TSP to remove any grease, and then go to town. If the old paint is an oil base and you are now using a latex based paint, you might want to give it a coat of primer first. Primer dries fast and bonds to the old paint and gives a "tooth" for the new paint to adhere to.
Avoid the cheapie big box paint. Go to the paint store and get the good stuff. They will also advise you on the right kind of primer and prep stuff to get.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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On Mon, 3 Jan 2005 20:17:28 -0500, "Mastermech"

Do you have a venthood to remove moisture? Get one and use it or ...
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Greetings,
This all sounds like a lot of work to me. It might be even less work to put up another sheet of 3/8" drywall over your existing ceiling and paint it. The finished product will look BRAND NEW and will never fail because of paint / dirt underneith.
Hope this helps, William

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