Screw extractor

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On Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 2:36:37 PM UTC-4, Ralph Mowery wrote:

A final tighten, or a final check?
If they have the impact wrench set low enough, and then they add some torque with the torque wrench, seems to me that is the ideal way to do it.
But usually I see them put them on with the air tool and check with the torque wrench. That proves it had at least enough torque, but doesn't prove there isn't too much. You would have to loosen and retighten, and I've never seen that happen.
Here's a good article from an interesting site: http://www.boltscience.com/pages/quality.htm
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http://www.boltscience.com/pages/tighten.htm
Or this.
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Surely the air tool can be set precisely?
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On Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 2:03:20 PM UTC-4, philo wrote:

I have always hated four-ways. Long ago, I made sure I had the proper "single bar" tire iron for all of my cars.
Now I have the proper sized 1/2" sockets, a 25" breaker bar to loosen them and a torque wrench to put them back on properly.
Even the rusted lugs on my trailer came right off after 2+ years of being ignored. Breaker bars area so cool!
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To put them back on, I just put them on with half the maximum force I can apply. That way I know I can apply twice the force to remove them later.
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On Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 2:37:25 PM UTC-4, Mr Macaw wrote:

You do realize that every vehicle has specific torque values that they want you to use, don't you?
My vehicles range from 80 ft-lbs to 94 ft-lbs.
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Why does it have to be that exact? As long you can get it back off, it doesn't come off by itself, and you don't snap the bolt, who cares what the precise number is?
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You can distort the rotors.
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On Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 3:03:43 PM UTC-4, Mr Macaw wrote:

r.

precise number is?

Problems Caused by Improper Torque There are several different issues that lug nuts with an improper amount of torque can cause. The problems can range in severity depending on whether they are over or under tightened and how far the amount of torque deviates from what is required. Some of the most common lug nut related problems are listed below.
Stretched Wheel Studs The wheel studs that the lug nuts attach to are designed to provide a tiny amount of give when being tightened. They may stretch a small amount, but n ot enough to cause any damage when the proper amount of torque is applied. Over-tightening, however, can put too much strain on the wheel studs, weake ning them and causing them to suddenly snap while driving, if not during th e tightening process itself.
Warped Brake Rotors Over-tightening the lug nuts is also a major contributor to warped or damag ed brake rotors. Once the brake rotors are damaged, a vehicle will shake or vibrate upon braking. The problem is even more pronounced when lug nuts ar e tightened unevenly or in the wrong pattern, putting more force on some ar eas of the wheel than others. Depending on the severity, this can be quite dangerous as well as costly to repair. In the worst cases, it becomes diffi cult or impossible to adequately control a vehicle upon braking.
Unbalanced Wheels If lug nuts aren't tightened enough, it can be just as dangerous. A loose w heel will wobble and become unbalanced, and this can cause stress to the wh eel studs, among other issues. The wobbling can eventually loosen all of th e lug nuts until they fall off completely, at which point there would be no thing holding the entire wheel on the vehicle. This can obviously lead to c atastrophic circumstances while driving.
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Funny how those never actually happen.
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But they do. In high school several of us were riding down the road about 45 MPH and a tire passed us. A second or so later the back of the car we were fell down as that was our tire..Good thing it was the back and not the frount tire.
I worked for a while at a place changing tires while in school. A fellow came in saying he had just bought a tire and it was wobbling so bad he could not keep it in the road. The salesman had tried to sell him two radial tires ( they had not been out too long) but the fellow insisted he only needed one tire. The sales man told him it would not work as they would make it difficult to stear if not put on in pairs. While I was putting the other new tire on, I noticed the other tire had loose lug nuts. I tightened them and did not say anything about that to him. At that time there was an impact wrench in the shop that did not work correctly so only snuged the bolts on.
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I've never heard of that happening, it must be quite rare.
Just a minute, how did it achieve a higher speed than you? Isn't that against the laws of physics?

Tyres. Tires means you're fed up :-P

One radial wouldn't have done that, must have been the loose nuts. I had a Renault once that continually loosened its own nuts. Damn annoying. The only theory anyone came up with was the wheelnuts (they're bolts actually, I've never seen nuts) were a different metal to the wheels and you have to have alloy nuts for alloy wheels or they don't grip.
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On Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 5:16:02 PM UTC-4, Mr Macaw wrote:

Maybe you should have torqued them properly.

What are these?
http://www.3sx.com/store/catalog/wheel-lug-studs-nonoem-06-600l.jpg
What are these?
http://www.okoffroad.com/gifs/stuff/lugnuts-toy-1.jpg
I'll tell you this, if the items in the second image loosen up you've got problems. If the items in the first image loosen up you've got *big* problems.
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Only car that did it - therefore French shite.

Never had a car with either of those. Every single time I've changed a tyre, I take out a BOLT. I don't suppose one is any better than the other. Expect it might be a little easier to put the wheel on if you can hang it on the bolts that are already there, then apply nuts. With wheel bolts, you have to hold the wheel up while you get the first bolt in.
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On Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 3:46:27 PM UTC-4, Mr Macaw wrote:

t> wrote:

ater.

he precise number is?

her they are over or under tightened and how far the amount of torque devia tes from what is required. Some of the most common lug nut related problems are listed below.

ut not enough to cause any damage when the proper amount of torque is appli ed. Over-tightening, however, can put too much strain on the wheel studs, w eakening them and causing them to suddenly snap while driving, if not durin g the tightening process itself.

e or vibrate upon braking. The problem is even more pronounced when lug nut s are tightened unevenly or in the wrong pattern, putting more force on som e areas of the wheel than others. Depending on the severity, this can be qu ite dangerous as well as costly to repair. In the worst cases, it becomes d ifficult or impossible to adequately control a vehicle upon braking.

e wheel studs, among other issues. The wobbling can eventually loosen all o f the lug nuts until they fall off completely, at which point there would b e nothing holding the entire wheel on the vehicle. This can obviously lead to catastrophic circumstances while driving.

Believe what you want. If you don't think that over tightening lug nuts can warp a rotor or stress a lug, you just keep doing doing it your way.
In the meantime, stay away from my vehicles.
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I've owned about 15 vehicles in 19 years, so that's a big enough data set to tell that it's not likely.
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On Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 8:21:59 PM UTC-4, Mr Macaw wrote:

t> wrote:

.net> wrote:

m later.

t the precise number is?

hether they are over or under tightened and how far the amount of torque de viates from what is required. Some of the most common lug nut related probl ems are listed below.

, but not enough to cause any damage when the proper amount of torque is ap plied. Over-tightening, however, can put too much strain on the wheel studs , weakening them and causing them to suddenly snap while driving, if not du ring the tightening process itself.

hake or vibrate upon braking. The problem is even more pronounced when lug nuts are tightened unevenly or in the wrong pattern, putting more force on some areas of the wheel than others. Depending on the severity, this can be quite dangerous as well as costly to repair. In the worst cases, it become s difficult or impossible to adequately control a vehicle upon braking.

the wheel studs, among other issues. The wobbling can eventually loosen al l of the lug nuts until they fall off completely, at which point there woul d be nothing holding the entire wheel on the vehicle. This can obviously le ad to catastrophic circumstances while driving.

Another idiotic statement. Perhaps you should leave off your tag lines and just use statements like that. They are almost as funny.
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On 3/31/2016 6:53 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

wobble and become unbalanced, and this can cause stress to the wheel studs, among other issues. The wobbling can eventually loosen all of the lug nuts until they fall off completely, at which point there would be nothing holding the entire wheel on the vehicle. This can obviously lead to catastrophic circumstances while driving.

I've had lugs come loose. And more than once when a wheel fell off. Each time due to improper torque. One time due to failure to recheck torque on an aluminum wheel after 25, and then after 50 miles of driving. So, yes, I know that lug torque and torque recheck are both important.
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On Thursday, March 31, 2016 at 3:46:27 PM UTC-4, Mr Macaw wrote:

t> wrote:

ater.

he precise number is?

her they are over or under tightened and how far the amount of torque devia tes from what is required. Some of the most common lug nut related problems are listed below.

ut not enough to cause any damage when the proper amount of torque is appli ed. Over-tightening, however, can put too much strain on the wheel studs, w eakening them and causing them to suddenly snap while driving, if not durin g the tightening process itself.

e or vibrate upon braking. The problem is even more pronounced when lug nut s are tightened unevenly or in the wrong pattern, putting more force on som e areas of the wheel than others. Depending on the severity, this can be qu ite dangerous as well as costly to repair. In the worst cases, it becomes d ifficult or impossible to adequately control a vehicle upon braking.

e wheel studs, among other issues. The wobbling can eventually loosen all o f the lug nuts until they fall off completely, at which point there would b e nothing holding the entire wheel on the vehicle. This can obviously lead to catastrophic circumstances while driving.

Excellent article explaining the different ways that wheels can separate from a vehicle. Pay special attention to the discussion related to "clamping force" and how the proper clamping force is achieved through proper torque.
If you want to see lots of examples of wheels coming off cars, just check out youtube.
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Amplification of bad things, only the ones that go tits up are filmed and published. Gives the wrong impression of chance.
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