SCR dimmer control for portable electric heater??

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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

I would suggest taking a cheap dimmer and combining it with a triac from an old microwave oven. If you're handy with electronics and working with sheet aluminum, you can easily make your own high current control. A flat piece of aluminum with strips of aluminum angle and a bit of heat sink grease can make a great heat sink for the triac. It could be built out of parts from a junk pile with a minimum of new parts for insulating things.
TDD
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On Mon, 22 Mar 2010 13:50:08 -0500, The Daring Dufas

why bother gutting a microwave oven? Just take a cheap dimer and replace the triac with a higher current version bought new. Did a look up @ digikey: For example, a 800V 16A (good for 1900 Watts @ 120V) is $1.27. 25A is $1.33. It is far cheaper than the labor involved with gutting a uwave oven.
Heaters are a resistive load; they're easy to control with a dimmer.
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AZ Nomad wrote:

But where's the fun in that? I like to tinker with things and turn them into other things. When I was a kid, I was very good at turning electrical devices into smoke generators.
TDD
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On Mon, 22 Mar 2010 15:03:27 -0500, The Daring Dufas

Electrical devices run on smoke. If you let the smoke out, they quit working.
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AZ Nomad wrote:

"Magic smoke", you big silly.
TDD
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On Mon, 22 Mar 2010 14:49:58 -0500, AZ Nomad

maximum operating voltage. Higher voltage rated devices generally have a higher voltage DROP as well - meaning higher dissipation - or is that only in MosFets?
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That is indeed only negligibly true, at least in general, with semiconductors other than MOSFETs and Schottky diodes, as long as you stay within a specific general chemistry (such as silicon as opposed to silicon carbide or germanium or gallium arsenide).
(Actually, this voltage drop variation with voltage rating is slightly true with bipolar transistors. 1000 volt bipolar transistors have significantly higher saturation voltage and generally less gain than ones rated 60 volts or less.)
I expect negligible to minimal difference in voltage drop between a 200 volt triac and a 600 volt one.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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On Mar 22, 10:26pm, snipped-for-privacy@manx.misty.com (Don Klipstein) wrote:

peckerhead.net> wrote:

Here:
Lutron C-2000 Centurion Rotary On/Off Dimmer Large Control 2000W
http://www.prolighting.com/lucceroondil1.html
$88 each, How much easier could it be? There's also a Centurion version for $63, 2000W.
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On Mar 22, 5:46pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

eckerhead.net> wrote:

I dont know how practical modifying a dimmer would be but the idea is good. I have made some big ones like that and the only difference between a 300 watt one and the 2000 watt dimmer is the size of the triac.
Jimmie
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