Satalite Dish?

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Fiber optic cable is a lot different than the old style cable on reception.

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Yes,fiber systems use fewer amplifiers in the distribution chain,whcih means less added noise,hence a better signal/noise ratio.Also,fiber is immune to many external noise sources common to pure metallic cable systems. Even a loose or corroded F-connector can add significant noise to a cable system.It's one of the most common problems.
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Jim Yanik,NRA member
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Karen) wrote in

Well,with an ordinary NTSC TV(not hi-definition),even a digital cable source has to be converted BACK into NTSC video modulated on CH3/4 to be displayed on a TV,unless you go thru the S-video inputs,which many TV's do not have.And then you are limited to the max resolution that NTSC can provide.So,it's entirely possible for him to have 'crystal clear' analog signals;his system does a good job on signal/noise ratio.Since he says its a fiber system,that's very probable.
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The bottom line here is that everyone considering satellite vs. cable has to look at what is available in their own local area. Every geographic area is different. Where I am its a no-brainer to use satellite. Similar programming (with local channels, an extra set-top box is at least $5 cheaper per month than is the cable service. The only two reasons not to do satellite are 1. Local sports team fans have to have cable to get the cable feed of those teams games 2. You don't want to ruin the line of your abode by a dish sticking out from your chimney or roof or whatever.
The funky thing is that I have also subscribed to basic cable TV service but told them not to hook it up. That little deal ends saving me another $3 on my cable internet bill.
You've got to look at what's available in your area. Take advanatage of the best deal for you. Don;t pay attention to people comparing non digital cable pictures todigital satellite pictures. That's just apples and oranges and not fair.
The weather concerns stated here come in to forms
1: Very TALL clouds (not all rain or snow clouds necessarily) will knock out your picture from anywhere between a few sends to a few minutes depending on how fast the cloud is moving. Out of 100 storms I've had here only 3-5 of them come with tall enough clouds to knowck out the picture and then only for a few minutes at most.
2. Snow. If the dish is placed in a place that it will collect snow, if enough falls on the right parts of the dish, you'll suffer some or complete signal loss. I've taken a broom to my dish one or twice each winter.
Good luck

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Different areas of the CONUS have different satellite signal strength levels.I belive 'just clouds' knocking out the signal is fairly rare. Rain fade is very possible,though.Snowstorm would be worse,I suspect.

The snow-in-dish problem is why someone created a system to mount the dish indoors,looking out a window.
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On Thu, 24 Jul 2003 01:17:29 +0000 (UTC), Jim Yanik

That's what dish covers are for. The dish indoors thing is for those that have no balcony, or cannot install a dish outside.
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Seems like you still could get snow/ice buildup even with a cover,although the vertical angle of the dish and it's shallow parabola would seem to preclude it filling with snow. A cover would also increase the wind loading.
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On Tue, 22 Jul 2003 03:03:53 +0000 (UTC), Jim Yanik

For the digital and analog pay channels though. Unscrambled analog channels don't need a box.
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kill file aarra monvsesien the ass
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I have cable internet AND a dish. I looked at scrapping the dish when I got broadband, but it just didn't make sense -- I pay $36 a month (tax included) for A LOT more channels than even digital cable at $50/month.
-Tim

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When snow builds up on the face of the dish you do loose signal. You have to keep running out to sweep off the snow build up.......

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Cable is a pretty vague term! What you get for cable may not even be close to what I get. Some cable companies give crappy reception and very limited channels. We have digital cable in our area and it competes well with satellite. I am on cable now, have had Dish Network also. Dish had a couple more channels, but no local/network in our area. I get internet off cable also, so there can be pros and cons for each depending on your area.
One consideration with satellite, if you are in an area that gets heavy rain often, you may loose signal 'till the rain lets up.
As far as protecting the dish, there is no need to! It is designed to be outside! Greg
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnospam (Roseb441702) wrote in

I've had a Direct TV system for about 5 years without any problems. We moved, decided to switch to DishNetwork and had it for 3 years. Also with no problems. The dishes hold up pretty well. We had a hail storm with quite a bit of damage, enough to re-roof a 3 year old house. The dish withstood it and still worked well. I think in the total of 8 years of having a dish, we only experienced a few outages. Storms didn't seem to affect it.
As far as repair, if something does get dammaged, I'm sure you can find a replacement dish at a garage sale or even on e-bay pretty cheap.
This is assuming you are looking at the 13 inch dish systems. I think the full size dishes are still around but not as popular.
As far as what is better, cable or a dish, check to see what is available with the cable in your area and compare it to the programming / pricing of a dish. We just switched to cable because of the internet service. We only got a handful of channels without upgrading to digital service. With digital, the minimum cost was over 50/month with a $8.00 box rental fee. Most of the local and analog stations on cable were fuzzy. I was able to pick up a better signal with my antenna that I used when I had a dish. I saved $10.00 off of the Internet service, but what's the use if you end up watching TV off of the Antenna instead. Several phone calls to the cable company ended up with "As long as the digital is coming through clear, we can't do anything about the analog channels." We ended up canceling the Television part of Cable and keeping the internet. It wasn't worth it. DishNetwork and Direct TV start at about 35.00 a month I think.
Also ask your neighbors if they have cable and if they are happy with it. Just because I had a bad cable experience doesn't mean all cable companies provide bad service.
Mike
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnospam (Roseb441702) wrote in message

In the dish itself, there is very little to go wrong. The dish is painted metal, and the only electronics is the LNB which is the part that sticks out. Those are the items that actually pick up the signal and send them to your box. It's pretty simple to install and align, so don't be afraid about that. In fact, when I moved, I was able to align the dish without a compass!
These things are solid state, and I would be surprised if you ever had a box that went bad. It's all digital, however, as with cable, you can have a lousy digital picture because of the amount of compression used on a particular channel. I think DirecTV changes the amount of compression on each channel based on how popular it is.
If you're into sports, DirecTV offers the NFL package, which enables you to watch EVERY NFL game played. It's a football fan's paradise. From what I understand, they're offering a few more options this year with the NFL package as well.
You don't necessarily need a box in each room. You can split the video signal AFTER it exits the box, and run it to each room if you want. Obviously, the same picture would be on each TV, but think about how you are going to use it. For example, do you have a TV in your bedroom that's only used when you're going to bed? Well, maybe you don't need a separate box for that one. You can buy a wireless remote control extender which allows you to use your remote in that room, even though the box is located elsewhere. Some boxes also have RF remotes which allow you to use it throughout the house.
DirecTV also offers additiona HDTV channels, if you ever get into that. If you haven't experienced HDTV, go to your local outlet and have them put on the PBS Demo loop, HDNET, or the HD-Discovery Channel. You'll be blown away.
Yes, the dish is affected by weather occasionally, but in my experience, only when there's a massive downpour do I lose signal. Usually in a minute or two the signal is back up. I would have to go through monsoon after monsoon to add up to the time I was down the two years I rented cable, that's for sure. Something breaks with your cable, and you're down a week or two waiting for their crews to come out to check the line, plus you have to be home!!!
Hope this helps. Obviously I'm biased towards a dish, but I think it's an objective comparision since I've had both. I don't work for any of the companies, so I'm not biased there.
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