Ryobi tools

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Are Ryobi tools good ?
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They are good low quality tools. They will be more likely to have sleeve bearings instead of ball bearings, etc. Good tools for the DIY, won't last as long in heavy daily use.
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desgnr wrote:

Depends on the tool. Most are about as good as harbor freight stuff, except they are two to three times the cost.
Jon
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The cordless drills make good paperweights.
They are OK for low use homeowner stuff, but not pro quality. If you want them for small projects around the house, they should be fine.
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They make good Christmas presents for someone not very high on your list.
Joe
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desgnr wrote:

Hi, For general purpose home use, I'd go for Sears Craftsman stuff. Most of my power tools are Milwaukee, old Porter Cable, DeWalt, Bosch. They never let me down with big or small project.
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You might as well buy the cheapest items you can find at kmart or walmart. They're the same as craftsman, minus the overhyped brand name.
Kmart is of course the same company as sears, but they don't mark up 1000% for the craftsman name.
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I know a pro that has all their tools and is happy, he did months worth of work for me with them. They are not the best heavy duty tools but I own a few and am happy since the price is great. My friend has HF and his 18v circular saw he said doesnt compare to Ryobi which I own. For everyday hard use maybe get something better, Ridgid the HD brand has the best warranty and HD is easy to work with. Id say for the price and homeowner use Ryobi is very good, much better than HF or B&D, B&D I consider as, its gonna break soon.
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wrote:

I know a pro that has all their tools and is happy, he did months worth of work for me with them. They are not the best heavy duty tools but I own a few and am happy since the price is great. My friend has HF and his 18v circular saw he said doesnt compare to Ryobi which I own. For everyday hard use maybe get something better, Ridgid the HD brand has the best warranty and HD is easy to work with. Id say for the price and homeowner use Ryobi is very good, much better than HF or B&D, B&D I consider as, its gonna break soon.
Ryobi is GREAT for the DIY'er or handyman which is the intended customers...I have the chop saw , skillsaw , tablesaw and a dufflebag full of cordless tools and love them..Total cost...less than 500 bucks...I NEVER could have afforded to buy the pro brands and have everything I have... Also , I have no need to "show off " or make up for other "short comings" by buying pro brands to brag about....The only faults I found were the saw blades are CRAP and the batteries only last a few years...Maybe the new Lithium ones are better ???
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Not a question of bragging or showing off. My Ryobi drill has needed two repairs and new battery in a short time. My Panasonic is lighter, more powerful, more durable with many more hours now than the Ryobi. The Ryobi stuff is suitable for many people, but will never equal the pro stuff for heavier users. Everyone has different needs.
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wrote in message

A while back I got a Dewalt 1/2 inch drill for work that was JUNK right out of the box...Started smoking on the first pail of mud I was mixing...The one I had before was good and the one I exchanged the junk one for is fine...I suppose I should have judged ALL Dewalt tools on that one bad one ??? I go through them every few years ...Mixing hundreds of buckets of joint compound a year is kinda hard on them...LOL...
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Yes, you should have. The guys at work with DeWalt drills are now using other brands. Most had the transmission replaced a couple of times. I'd not have one based on their experience.
I recently tossed a Ryobi 18V that one of they guys used because it burned up drilling a hole in steel. Used as a driver for screws it was OK but not for real industrial work. The Ryobi was good for about 5 holes and dies, but a Milwaukee did the other 90 holes with no problems.
The 10 year old Porter Cable is still working though, but I'm not so sure about the new ones since they've been bought out.
My comments are not based on one drill, but what I've observed over the past 15 years where people use cordless tools on a regular basis. That include other tools such as circular saw, reciprocating saw and a few others.
How about sawing concrete? The two B & D (corded) saws did not cut more than 5' each but the Skil did 20 feet and the Milwaukee is still working after 100'. Polishing? A Dremel lasted a two weeks, the Fordham is still working after 5 years.
I do like the DeWalt miter saw though and a Rigid chop saw is still working after a number or years after cutting a lot of Schedule 40 pipe. .
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wrote in message

Ryobi was NEVER intended for *industrial use*...LOL..You do realize the difference between homeowner quality and pro quality ??? What dolt would bring a Ryobi or B&D tool to an *industrial* jobsite..I bet they never heard the end of it....LOL....I have tried a Makita 1/2 inch drill...Only lasted a year....Maybe I'll try a Rigid or Milwaukee next....Hard to beat Dewalt's price...Half of the Milwaukee...I just wonder if it will last more than the 3 years I get out a Dewalt mixing several pails of joint compound a day every day to justify the extra money...Only one way to find out I guess....
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We have a couple of cheap guys that think a low price is a bargain. They drink cheap booze too.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Quite frankly, my Harbor Freight drill outlasted the Ryobi by a longshot, and was cheaper.
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wrote:

Most are lower-end quality. The Ryobi belt sander is quite good.
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desgnr wrote:

Consumer Reports evaluations of cordless drills: Dec. 2007, Nov. 2008, Nov. 2009 The last two articles are really stripped down and list only about 15-20 products out of over 60 tested. In the latest one, among drills for general use they listed the 18V lithium battery Ryobi #3 (#2 a year earlier, when they listed an 18V nicad Ryobi #8). Generally they've ranked Ryobi higher than Skil, Black & Decker Firestorm and way above the Harbor Freight brands, like Central Machinery, but below the contractor brands, like DeWalt, Porter-Cable, Bosch, Makita, Milwaukee, and Panasonic. Among the latter, a 14.4V - 15.6V drill will usually perform as well as an 18V Ryobi. I believe the Sears Craftsman 19.2V drill is by Ryobi, as are a lot of their portable power tools now. As for sleeve bearings, the Ryobi cordless drills with single-speed gearboxes (drills are still variable speed) have them, but those with dual-speed gearboxes are almost all ball bearings. I have a 13 amp Ryobi circular saw that I believe has no sleeve bearings, at least none in exposed areas, but I haven't checked my biscuit jointer or handheld plane.
If you want to save money in the long term, maybe the best choice is Home Depot Ridgid because of the lifetime warranty, including for batteries. Better yet, if you don't need to work where 120VAC is unavailable or too hazardous to use, stick with corded tools.
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larry moe 'n curly wrote:

<snip>
Ryobi and Ridgid (and Milwaukee) are part of the same parent company, but of course the batteries are not interchangeable.
Are Ridgid actually better than Ryobi, or are they the same tool (except for the battery and the color) but with a better warranty?
Perce
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They used to be separate companies with nothing in common, but that may have changed with acquisition. Ridgid power tools were products of Emerson Electric at one time. I'd expect some consolidation of brands at some point.
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Yes, for throwing at cars that have loudspeakers in the grill playing rap crap.
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