Roofing Question

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Dottie wrote:

Do the neighbors have lighter color roofs? More shade? I once read that light color roofing, while helping reflect heat and keep it out of the attic, grows more mildew because it doesn't get as hot as a darker color. Can't prove it by me. Only place on our condo exterior walls that mildew used to thrive was on shaded areas - behind downspouts, behind some vegetation. Since repainting, there doesn't seem to be any.
Be clear about what your roofing is supposed to be "anti" - mildew and algae can be pretty different..
This link is pretty interesting: http://www.inspect-ny.com/roof/shinglestains.htm
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Get in touch with a good roofer and ask him to install a copper strip across the peak of the roof on both sides of the roof and when it rains the copper will react and stop mildew, it works, good luck henry penta, i seen this on the, this old house progran.
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wrote:>

The copper suggestion is the way to go.
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The new roof is medium brown - not too dark - but not as light as the neighbors who both have gray. They don't have algae yet and their roofs are two and three years old. I have some sort of metal strips along the outside edges of the roof. The very top has the Cobra ridge vent . The man who sprays does not have to walk on the roof. We used to have a tile roof (old one) and he couldn't walk on it or pressure wash it ... just spray from the sides....which worked out o.k. The east side of the old roof used to get mold/mildew on it because it was not in the sun as much as the west side. We don't have large oak trees in our yard.
I do want to talk to someone at GAF before doing anything - probably will call Monday. Thank you all though.
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wrote:

Get in touch with a good roofer and ask him to install a copper strip across the peak of the roof on both sides of the roof and when it rains the copper will react and stop mildew, it works, good luck henry penta, i seen this on the, this old house progran.
That what my father in law used to have on his house. When he got a new roof they didnt put one back up saying he didnt need it with the new shingles. Well he didnt for about 4 or 5 years, then he started to spray the roof with copper sulfate. He more or less covered the whole roof with it but Ive heard yu can just spray it up on the ridge.
Jimmie
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wrote:

A lot less expensive will be zinc strips. They sell them specifically made for this. Half nailed under a shingle lip and half exposed.
There are other versions but it's zinc.
If you ever noticed a soiled dark roof that has metal vent stacks. From the stack down it's not dark. Stack is galvanized. Galvanizing contains zinc.
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Jimmie D wrote:

A zinc strip placed along the ridge will also inhibit mold formation. I'd be worried about the longevity of the Timberline mildewcide.
Boden
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My father in laws home was under oak trees in FL and once a year he sprayed his roof with a copper sulfate solution. He uses one of those hose end sprayers and stands on a piece of scaffolding layed across his pickup bed. While he was at it he sprayed tree trunks to keep moss and fungus from growing on them also. CuSO4 is pretty cheap. He never worried too much about getting it on evenly. He said the spots he missed this year he would get next year.
Ive heard using copper roofing nails will stop mold too but dont know if that works or not.
Jimmie
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