RJ 45 for Data and Telecom Colors

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Hello,
This message is following up to another post. I'm going to go ahead and utilize Cat 6 for both Ethernet and telephone, cutting cost by purchasing it in bulk, etc. I'm just wondering, before we start working, is there any industry standard color for Ethernet or telecom jacks. Remember they look exactly the same, and if there is no "standard" than I'll just pick one for the data, like green or blue.
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There is no standard for the color of the wrap, just the colors of the wires inside the wrap.

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There are lots of Color standards. (-;
Typically you would not want to run Phone and Data in the same Cable because of interference issues. Though for home use, you could probably get away with it.
Typically you use the Blue pair for your Line 1 of your Phone. Orange would be Line 2, Green 3, brown 4
On Ethernet For 10/100, they use the Orange and Green Pairs. Gigabit uses all 4 pairs. Sine you want to use the same cable, we wont get into gigabit.
The Jacks for Phone and Data are Different RJ11 vs RJ45. Though you can stick an RJ11 Plug into a RJ45 Jack.
For RJ11, you want the Center 2 Pins for Line 1 of the Phone, outer 2 pins for Line 2
1 White/Orange 2 Blue/White 3 White/Blue 4 Orange/White
For Data, you want a RJ45 Jack and use pins 1,2,3,6 1 White/Orange 2 Orange/White 3 White/Green 6 Green/White
Scott<-

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Hmmm, Were you talking about the color of the Jacket itself?
There is no Color standard that I'm aware of. We use Different Colors for Different Networks, Different Suites, etc/ Scott<-

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No no. I know how to terminate Cat 6 and why I should use phone and Ethernet on one cable. I'm talking about the actual jacks, the part you can see in the wall. Some offices have it so that the Ethernet jack is blue, and the white one right next to it is Telephone. I know how to run cable, but I'm paying someone else to do it because I don't have enough time. I'm just curious about the color of the female RJ-45 jacks.
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Correction: I know why you should not use the same cable for phone and data. Every time the phone rings, packet loss will jump to 99%.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

would look strange. Why not use RJ11 for phone and RJ45 for Enet, like god intended? While you might plug a phone into the wrong jack, you can't plug the Enet into the phone line. Either way, nothing bad should happen.
--
Keith

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Keith Williams wrote:

The colors of the jack bodies are simply a matter of convenience. When I installed mine I picked up every color I could get from my distributor. Each room has its own color and on the patch in the basement I then labeled them as "blue data" "red data" etc. since this seemed to be less confusing in the long run that referring to bedroom 1..n, office, family room, etc. The RJ-11 jacks for the phones co-mounted with the data RJ-45s were simply chosen to match the plate color but since they are always matched 1:1 with data jacks I refer to them by color too.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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For the telephone lines, it used to be important to observe the polarity of lines 2-3 and 1-4. Not so now according to the AT&T tech. who installed my POTS recently.
TKM
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Scott Townsend wrote:

Are you suggesting a phone line to be more noisy than an ethernet signal?

i use RJ45 all around, and I use black for network offwhite for the phone.

--
Thank you,



"Then said I, Wisdom [is] better than strength: nevertheless the poor
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wrote:

Certainly, particularly if there is anm old ferro ringer connected. Add a rotary phone and you have a random noise generator. POTS is nasty stuff with upwards of 110 v at 20 hz on the line when it rings.
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Google for "568b", which is an industry standard for LAN cable pinout. lots of information to be found.
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Using one cable ( 4 pairs) for both phone and 10/100 data is, IMNSHO, not a good idea. Can it be done? Yes. Should it be done. No.
Cable is relatively cheap. Your labor is not. There is no big labor cost in running two instead of 1 cable. Just tape the cable ends to gether as you start pullling off the spools foreach run.
Its not that much more expensive to run two cables. Get Cat 5 with two different color jackets. Mine happen to be blue and yellow. Blue is phones, yellow is data.
If you have to run only 1 cable, use the bkue pair for phone line 1 and the oange pair for phone line to to follow standard industry practice for phone pairs. Reserve green and brown for your 10/100 data.
Wiring your data jacks is going to be real interesting. Without my charts in front of me, I can\\t even begin to remember the wiring positions for the RJ 45 stuff. All the RJ 45 hardware terminals I have ever seen are of course color coded and assume that all 4 pairs are being wired to the jack. I expect you'll spend more than your time is worth, and more than an extra cable will cost, figuring out the data wiring positions on the RJ 45 jacks.
As i type this I have the sudden bad feeling you may be trying to wre both the phone signals and data signals ino ythe same jack as well as carrying the signals in the same cable. Trying to use the same jack for phone and data is a sure recipie for failure.
If yu rae
--
Jim McLaughlin

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The question was simple - is their a color standard for jacks - not jackets, not color of the wiring/pinouts. As far as I know, there is no standard RJ45 jack color - I've seen orange, blue, and white/tan/ivory. There is an advantage in having the RJ11's a different color than the RJ45 - it makes it less likely that someone will plug a phone into the wrong jack.
Elliott P wrote:

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Correct. There is no standard color for RJ45 jacks. There are colors available to use as you wish; but you can also find wall jacks in white or whatever color matches the wall plate.
TKM
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What's the point anyway when your fishing around blind behind the desk trying to find a place to plug in. Once the room in furnished, you will not be able to see most of them anyway (maybe). With RG-11/RG-45 you can feel the difference with your finger. Also I assume all the phones will be on top while all the network on the bottom (or vice versa). That is, I assume you will be consistant with placement.
Use a label maker or print some icons onto some clear mailing labels, cut them out and stick them on the faceplate. Many of the faceplates have a molded flat spot for labeling.
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I just wired my entire house with cat5e cable for computer network and phones. I did not put network and phone on the same cable , but rather separate cat5e cables for the phones and network. It was all done with home runs back to a structured wiring enclosure. This let my apply a whole-house DSL filter and use a punchdown block for all the phone lines in the house. It makes for a really nice, tidy setup that's easy to add to or reconfigure if necessary.
I used the blue/blue-white pair for the phones, and just twisted the rest of the pairs back over the cable in case I need them in the future. Blue/blue-white is what the Telco in these parts uses. They call blue/blue-white the "first pair".
As for the network, I hooked up all 4 pairs according to the 586 "B" standard. Google 586B and you'll get the drift.

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Elliott P posted for all of us... I don't top post - see either inline or at bottom.

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I said I don\'t know and I don\'t care...
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Top post? lol I'm not l337 enough in my usenet skillz to know what you mean. I will say that I am comfortable with running wire but might just have a professional do it, depending on costs... I have a crimp tool and all that. Obviously only a technophile would want to use Cat _6_ for simple telephone calls! I might even look at Cat 7 but it's still in it's infancy.
By the way, Cat 7 is going to be amazing! 10 gigabit?! You could move 100 gigs in a few minutes.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_7_cable
Excerpt: Category 7 cable (CAT7), (ISO/IEC 11801:2002 category 7/class F), is a cable standard for Ultra Fast Ethernet and other interconnect technologies that can be made to be backwards compatible with traditional CAT5 and CAT6 Ethernet cable. CAT7 features even more stringent specifications for crosstalk and system noise than CAT6. To achieve this, shielding has been added for individual wire pairs and the cable as a whole.
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<snip>
I haven't seen any written standards, but personally, I wire wire my stuff like this:
White wall faceplate White telephone jack (6P6C, 6P4C) White RJ45 (8P8C) network connector for connection of PC to hub Red RJ45 (8P8C) network connector for connection of hub to hub
Very seldom does the red ones get used since I usually just do the crossover with the cable from the outlet to the hub in the remote room... Note, if you're going to make up crossover patch cables, make them in a different color so that you don't try to use them as standard cables later on... I usually choose red for them also...
The end result of this is that *most* rooms just have white outlets and it matches everything else in the room...
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