rescreening a patio door

any tips or tricks to keeping the screen (fiberglass) tight while rolling in the spline?? we've already done it twice and still the screen is not very tight...very frustrating
thanks, cj
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Masking tape
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cj wrote:

Lay it straight, flat. cut 4 short pieces of spline. Anchor the screen at four points, middle of each side/end so it is square and taught but not pulling frame out of shape. Then start at a corner, rolling in the spline and removing the short pieces as you get to them.
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Cut the screen a little oversize and make sure you have the CORRECT size spline for the frame.
Stretch the spline as you roll into the frame channel. Do the top, and one side first. The bottom and the other side?
Do not torque the frame out of square. A razor blade to trim the screen.
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But don't over stretch it. Creates the equivalent of a thiner spline.

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Just curious, why do you want to use fiberglass instead of aluminum? You do know that aluminum lasts longer right?
P.S.: snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net is exactly right by the way.
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I have found that the pet-proof fiberglass screening is just about indestructible.
When the drapes are drawn on our patio door, our cat lets us know that she wants to come in by climbing the screen and jumping down to the deck. We hear the noise and let her in.
She's been doing this year-round for over 2 years and there isn't a single tear or any stretching of the screen.
I've walked full speed into the screen a few times over the years (don't ask!) and basically bounced off the screen without stretching it.
I doubt aluminum would stand up to that abuse.
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A long time ago I remember they used to use ordinary cheap gasoline. Not being a smoker I didnt know there was any difference.
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Sorry, title. Please ignore.
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If the screen is on a roll, don't cut it off the roll until you are done. The weight of the roll helps keep the screen taut until the spline is set.
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Subject: Re: rescreening a patio door Date: Sunday, May 10, 2009 5:13 PM
Just curious, why do you want to use fiberglass instead of aluminum? You do know that aluminum lasts longer right?
You'd think it would, but it doesn't.
By the time the outer layer of the very thin Aluminum turns to Aluminum oxide, there's really not much real Aluminum left in the strand.
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Having just done this for the first time myself back in April, I would say the best solution is to make it a two-person job. One of you work the splining material with the roller while the other helps keep tension on the screening material. I did that with my dad and the screens - three windows and two sliding doors - all came out beautifully.
Oh, and I found using four separate strands of the splining material for each of the four sides gave better results than trying to get the spline around the 90 corners.
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Continuous spline at corners can/should be notched for installation ease and appearance.
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