replacing vinyl kitchen flooring

I want to replace my vinyl flooring in my kitchen. It is one sheet of rolled out vinyl, not tile. however, it was installed before the cabinets were put in place.
Would I have to take out the cabinets, stove, etc, and take up the old flooring, or is it possible to cut around the cabinets and just put the new flooring along side of it? but, wouldn't that just looks tacky??
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Chris wrote:

No, it wouldn't. The proper method, after removal of the original vinyl, is to lay the new vinyl, then install quarter round or shoe mould all around the room. Pay particular attention to doorways because the new trim will not be installed against door casing or jambs, so those areas must be done well, or undercut the jamb and casing and insert the vinyl under them.
Another area that needs close cutting are areas like dishwasher spaces, stove spaces, etc. Sometimes the clearance on these are such that new trim may interfere with the installation of the appliance. These areas are generally out of sight, so they are less of a concern in that regard. I just like it tight.
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Robert Allison
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Chris wrote:

Only if you used tacky vinyl...
There should be a removeable toekick plate under the cabinets that will hold down and cover the edges of the new vinyl after its installed.. If not, you can add a piece of 1/2" quarter-round trim along the bottoms of the cabinets to hold down and cover the edge of the vinyl. However, if the installers are decent, they will tuck the edges such that you will not be able to tell the difference. All bets are off if you do it yourself. DIY vinyl installations are generally a nightmare...
Trim the vinyl back underneath the cabinets as far as you can, and peel the old stuff up. You may need to remove any baseboard trim along the walls too.
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thanks for the responses!
There is black vinyl moulding around the base of the cabinets. So, I guess I can cover up where the new vinyl will touch the old.. Along the walls, there is wood shoe moldings..
However, I forgot to add that the genius that put the vinyl sheet down just put it on top of bare floorboards. there are some holes in the vinyl and an area I peeled up and it is just bare floor board. plus, it is not completley glued down. There are areas that if I press down, there is some give until I hit solid underneath...
I think some sort of liner is in order as well, correct??
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Chris wrote:

Depends on what you mean by floor boards. What do you have under there? Plywood?
If plywood, then that is fine. If it is actually floorboards (typically 1x6 if it is underlayment), then you will need to put down some sheet underlayment. I like 1/4" luan or tempered hardboard.
Remove the shoe mould, remove the vinyl cove base. Take up the old. If needed, put down your underlayment. Install new vinyl. Install old shoe. Install new vinyl cove.
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Does he need to worry about asbestos content? I don't know how dangerous it is to take this stuff up.
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Buck Turgidson wrote:

No. Vinyl does not contain asbestos. At least not sheet vinyl. The old VA tiles (vinyl asbestos) contained asbestos, but are not really a threat to a one time exposure. That is not to say a person should not protect themselves, just that it is not much of a danger. Asbestos is a long term exposure danger, kind of like smoking. One cigarette won't do much harm, but 2 packs a day over a period of years....
The adhesive used for VA tiles also contained asbestos, but the same dangers exist for it. The adhesive for vinyl was and is a different animal and does not nor did it contain asbestos.
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Any loose, bubbled areas need to be removed. Cut out with a razor knife and remove.
Those holes will get filled in when you skimcoat the floor with a trowel. There are products from different mfgrs. I think Armstrong calls theirs S- 184. The skimcoat fills the holes and fills in the indentations in the pattern of the old one.
If you don't skimcoat it, over time from walking on it, the pattern from underneath can show through the new.
I'm no pro but have put down several floors that came out flawlessly. Here's the not a pro part - I made a pattern out of heavy brown paper then just cut the vinyl in a large flat area. In the field (areas away from the edge) I cut a bunch holes in the paper and put masking tape over sticking the paper to the old floor. Keeps the paper in place while you are making the pattern.
Bottom line - works for me with a great end result.
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Chris wrote:

One note - if your house is ~40+ years old, there could be asbestos tile under the vinyl. It's was fairly common in tiles used in kitchens and bathrooms. It's fine if you leave it, but if you disturb it - very bad! Most flooring people in my area would just put a new floor right over the vinyl in my kitchen so they don't have to deal with the HazMat cleanup (++$).
a
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