Replacing Galvinized Pipes with C-PVC Pipe?

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that's what I did 25 years ago and no problems.
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25 years? great.
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Same here but it has been a bit longer. One advantage of cpvc over copper is the ease of making changes/additions. A hacksaw (or tubing cutter), a bottle of glue, a bottle of cleaner/solvent and few cheap fittings will get a new run installed in minutes.
Odd that he didnt' suggest PEX. That stuff is more expensive than cpvc but is flexible to make runs through walls.
Harry K
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I read all about the different pipes available and decided to go with CPVC myself. It is good stuff!
"Tom" wrote in message

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Hi Tom,

My in-laws had galvanized pipe in their house also. They asked me to fix a leaky faucet one day. I thought it was a seal or something, but when I unscrewed the valve the whole faucet housing cracked away. So, I tried unbolting the faucet but the rusted pipe in the wall broke away instead. That meant replacing the pipe in the wall. When I tried to unthread the pipe in the basement, the fitting crumbled away. So, I tried to unscrew the next segment of pipe and it literally split lengthwise down the full length of the pipe! Even when I got back to a solid piece of pipe it had so much corrosion inside there was only a small 1/16 inch hole in the middle. Since half the pipe in the house had fallen apart in my hands and the other half was clogged with corrosion, I just replumbed the entire house with CPVC.
Go with the CPVC. I've been using it for years for a variety of projects and have never had a problem with it. I used it to plumb our entire house, as well as replumbing my in-laws house. It won't corrode the way galvanized does.
Copper is expensive these days, and it takes a bit of skill to sweat the joints properly. And there's always a small risk of accidently starting a fire with the torch. Copper can also develop pinhole leaks with acidic water.
PEX is becoming more popular but it usually requires special tools to install and isn't as widely available. Any mom and pop hardware store carries CPVC which will be important the next time you need to make a repair or addition late at night or on a weekend. Last I checked, PEX was one of the pricier options too.
Anthony
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My House is nearly 30 years old, the cpvc has been fine so far.
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wrote:

Sounds good to me.
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Cpvc is supposed to be good stuff. Pex appears to be the wave of the future, though. Pex doesn't burst if it freezes, I'm told.
He's right, copper is too expensive.
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Christopher A. Young
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