Replacing Bulbs Could Save You $55 Yearly

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Often enough at Home Depot I see 6-packs of 60-watt-equivalent spiral compact fluorescents for about $10, with no limit or any requirements other than grabbing them and paying for them.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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: >Xcel, Home Depot Offer Cheaper, Energy-Efficient Bulbs : >Replacing Bulbs Could Save You $55 Yearly : > : >POSTED: 4:24 pm MDT October 3, 2006 : > : >DENVER -- Need a light bulb? Xcel Energy is hoping you'll buy a compact : >fluorescent light bulb. : > : >Replacing five of your most used regular incandescent bulbs with : >fluorescent light bulbs can save you up to $55 a year in electricity : >costs. The compact fluorescent light bulbs use up to 75 percent less : >energy than typical incandescent light bulbs and they also last up to 10 : >times longer than incandescent bulbs. : > : >The fluorescent bulbs aren't cheap, but Xcel wants to make it easier. It's : >teamed up with Home Depot to offer discounted packs. The 60-watt pack has : >six bulbs for $5.97 or about $1 a bulb. The 100-watt pack has four bulbs : >for $5.97 or about a $1.49 a bulb. : > : >Customers will be limited to two discounted packs.
: Often enough at Home Depot I see 6-packs of 60-watt-equivalent spiral : compact fluorescents for about $10, with no limit or any requirements : other than grabbing them and paying for them.
: - Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
These flourescent lights aren't good for stairways or closets or anyplace where it will only be turned on for a very short period of time. I put them in a stairway where the light gets turned on right before you start up/down one end and then turned off right after you reach the other end. They last less than a year in that application so will actually cost more in the long run.
Point is, you need to carefully consider each application - they don't make sense everywhere.
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On Tue, 17 Oct 2006 15:56:00 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@reems.org wrote:

Maybe when LED arrays become more affordable, they'll be suitable for such locations.
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I first got CFLs due to their claims that they last (seven times?) longer than incandescents. our house had a problem of eating bulbs almost monthly. that was about 3 years ago, and i am in a different house (house payments, not rent!) and still have those bulbs, plus a few more to replace incandecents lost thru attrition.
like one person said, they can cut the bills for lighting from $3 to $1.wasn't much of an issue as $2 cant even buy a happy meal :) but i suppose every bit helps.
the rest of you are commenting about colors, not really an issue with me, although I like a lot of light, so being able to cram the equivalent of 300watts into a fixture that states no more than 180W (fire issues?) and only using (69?) watts is more of a plus than cost.
keep your reciepts and buyer beware. last batch of bulbs a bought had one dead, one way too dim, and one working. forgot to check warranty.
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Twisty Creek wrote:
<snip>

I agree with the premise, and actually have many of the compact fluorescents in my house, but *outdoor porch or post lamps?* that sounds like a really poor app. for fluorescents as at anything much under 50 degrees they will be slow to start or may not start at all. The PO used the CF's in the garage and they work very poorly in cool weather.
nate
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Hi Nate,
That's not strictly the case. For example, Philips Marathon Outdoor CFLs have a minimum starting temperature rating of -30C (-22F) and are said to provide "stable light output" from -10F all the way up to 140F. They may require a few minutes to warm up fully when cold but if the lamp will be left on for an extended period of time (and that's often true of porch and post lamps), that shouldn't be much of a concern.
Source: http://www.nam.lighting.philips.com/can/ecatalog/cfl/pdf/p-5095.pdf
Cheers, Paul

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Plus 'flooressence' bulbs make things look horrible! Full spectrum bulbs are the only way to go.
How about 'You could save $300/year by only drinking tap water' or 'Save $1,095' a year by not ever going to Starbucks'.
Twisty Creek wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote :

You can get 5000K compact fluorescent bulbs for around $10 each, that have the light output equivalent of a 120 watt lamp. Just get 5000K instead of warm white that the cheap ones put out.
But for lighting hallway areas at night, we use the cheap ones, which are warm white and put out 120 watts worth of light, and they cost under $2 each on ebay when you buy a box of 12 of them. They consume about 27 watts.
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