Replacing an FPE Stab Lock panel

Original panel dates to 1957. No issues with it but I've read about the many bad things about this unit. Also, the local codes now require 100A service and the present panel with two mains of 30 for the dryer circuit and 50 for the rest of the panel is now obsolete.
So the question is whether anyone is offering replacement internal guts for this unit. It's model 116-68C. If so I think I'd go that route.
Old box is flush in the wall.
If an entirely new box is needed, could one remove the existing guts and leave the old box in place? Mount a new panel right inside the old and maybe use the old cover, cut a big rectangle out leaving just a sort of rectangular ring and place it so as to cover the area where wires are emerging from their conduits (formerly the interor of the old box) and going an inch or so to enter the new box.
OR
What if one got a new box that was intentially larger than the old and mounted it on the surface in front of the old box? Again, the old box would be stripped of guts, and the cover removed and the box left in the wall. Wires could enter the new box from the rear. Those existing wires able to reach a breaker could go directly in. Those too short would just have new, longer runs pulled from their first place they go to (outlet box typically).
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On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 11:14:16 -0600, Chet Kincaid

I have a FPE Stab Lock panel in my house from 1979. It has a 100A main. I've never had any problems with it. I also considered replacing it, but I was told by a local electrician that they were improved in the 70's and a 1979 panel is as safe as any other breaker panel. While everyone has their opinions, I am not sure what to believe.....
However, in your case that is a really old panel, and with the main's problems, I'd be more inclined to change it.
I'm sure the guts of any panel can be modified to fit the panel, as long as it is not too large, but you'll have to modify the cover door too, so the breakers fit. That seems like a lot more trouble than just changing the whole box. Either way, you'll have to pull the meter. If you have to cut away a little plaster, why not just fill it in with some sort of decorative molding.
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On 12/15/2014 11:36 PM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

What't the risk if your man is wrong? Fire that burns the house down and kills every one inside?
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 22:36:32 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

panel. The only exception is installation of a conversion unit specifically designed and certified to fit your box.
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On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 22:36:32 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Look into the Cuttler Hammer replacement panelboards. They sell them to fit a lot of the old cans. Then it is a pretty easy swap out. Call the PoCo and tell them you are replacing the main breaker and you have to cut the seal. The procedure may vary from place to place but it is worth the call. You are not trying to work the panel hot and you avoid "alleged theft of service" problems that may arise from a cut seal.
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On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 23:55:09 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Anyone that tries to connect Mains which are HOT is insane. I've done my share of replacing outlets and switches or fixtures, while HOT, but doing anything with the Mains requires pulling the meter or having the PoCo disconnect at the pole.
If something goes wrong when changing an outlet while HOT, a breaker or fuse should blow, or can be turned off. But those Mains are not fused. Yea, there is a fuse (of sorts) by the pole transformer, but before that blows, people will die, or fires will start. And you cant just pull a lever to disconnect.
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On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 23:41:16 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Generally speaking, the listing for the panelboard is separate from the listing for the enclosure.
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On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 01:34:32 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

the total assembly (generally speaking)
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On Mon, 15 Dec 2014 23:35:01 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

but it can be safely done. I would not advise someone else do it - but I have done it safely on several occaisions.
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On 12/15/2014 12:14 PM, Chet Kincaid wrote:

out things that work. This is one case where it's not wise to mess around with saving old stuff.
I'd call several electricians to get estimates. Hire the guy (gal) who talks slowly, makes sense, and seem to know the task.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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