"Replacement Windows" versus "New Windows"

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I have just returned from shopping for windows to replace old, damaged windows in my 60 year old home.
Both brands I have looked at, Marvin and Anderson, offer either "new construction" windows which demand that the interior casing and trim be removed, or "replacement" windows which fit into the interior opening creating by removing only some of the original window.
The big advantage of the "replacement" windows is that they do not require paint, wallpaper, and possibly bathroom marble wall trim repairs / replacements, whereas the "new" style forces the interior rework.
Am I giving up anything by using the "replacement" style?? They certainly are preferable from an installation simplicity perspective.
Thanks for any opinions and comments in advance.
Smarty
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nope it will save lots of work.
although stock new windows are a lot cheaper, like from home depot
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In article

Contact Window World, they replaced my windows for less than half price quoted by others. Satisfied customer.
Free men own guns - www(dot)geocities(dot)com/CapitolHill/5357/
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Had new Replacement windows :Renewal by Anderson installed last year. Windows are great had some minor issues with installation that were handled quickly. Follow up was great after all issues cleared. These windows are NOT CHEAP not sure if you pay for holds true for everyone In my case I feel cost was justified. Frank
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The "opening" (the amount of glass you can see through) will be smaller with replacement windows.
I've put in a few and in my opinion, it's really not an issue.
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On Fri, 22 Feb 2008 14:22:30 GMT, Dan Espen

That's good to hear, since I still have my original windows.

Probably not for me either, but at least I have something to argue for my position now. ;)
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wrote:

There was a local company advertising a brand of window with "10% (?) more viewing area than typical replacement windows". I don't recall the brand, but it's winter so they're not advertising right now. Ask around at contractor supply houses or "window and door" stores. I doubt anybody at the borgs would know about any specialty brands.
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A lot will depend on the quality of the installers. If they just cover up damaged or rotted wood in your old bucking your new windows will not be as secure as they should be. I would want to be there watching and looking at the rough openings when the old windows come out. I am not sue how home inspectors evaluate replacement windows but if they get a bad name in that community it could affect resale value, whether the concern was valid or not.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I had some quality replacement windows installed last year. I was talking to one of the installers and mentioned that I heard of people replacing windows in relatively new houses, i.e. less than 10 years old. His comment was that windows were probably not installed right in the first place. In my experience with building inspectors, if as a home owner you get a permit to do something, an inspector will hound you. OTOH, if you are a builder, inspectors visits are infrequent and mistakes are quickly covered up by builders so inspectors don't see them.
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A replacement is fine. Some will have nail fins others will not. The replacement window will require least demo in the work area.
Ensure you have repaired any "moisture wrap", tucked, secured on the exterior. If the replacement has nail fins, lay a good bead of silicone caulk along the opening edge and nail the fins.
Think of how the water flows outside along the moisture barrier, so to keep away from and down the wall. not leaking at the window. -- Oren
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Yes, you're giving up a lot. When your original windows were installed, it is possible, even likely given that your house is 60 years old, that they did not insulate between the window frame and house framing. Significant energy loss occurs there. Just replacing the sash won't correct that.
Tear them out down to the frame and do it right.
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Any decent replacement window installers will insulate this gap and any voids you have. Even Lowes does it.
- Jeff
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How do they insulate the gap and voids? The area is inaccessable.
--
Thanks.


< snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
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Rather than 30 minutes and $3 in material, you can be talking many hours and new siding to do the job right. The answer varies according to construction and condition.
I've sold and installed many replacement windows. You take out the side stiles and sash weights and insulate. Installing replacement windows is easily a DIY job that is going to make the house more livable and you can save a bundle of money. I'd make the equivalent of about $80 $90 an hour in today's money.
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Actually the new construction windows in a frame home may require a lot more than interior work.
In a brick home your statement is accurate in most cases.
If your exterior sills and trim are in sound condition, this is a toss-up and the replacement type may be an acceptable choice for you.
If you have any rotten sills or exterior casings, new construction clad windows may be the better choice.
I have done it both ways depending on the circumstances.
Gives us a few more details.
--
Colbyt
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"Colbyt" <wrote

Hi Colby, nice beginning site! I saw a few where the header had 'aticle' vs 'article'. I liked the part on electrical outlet replacement. Nice and simply represented.
Perhaps I'll add an article or so for you to look at. Is there any specific one you are looking for? If I have skills in that area, I might try.
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I will check for the typos. Thanks for the information.
Any and all contributions are welcome even if they have a different "take" on something I have written. Empty categories would be of the most interest. I have several drywall ones that I not finalized yet.
I don't have a formal form yet for submitting an article.
--
Colbyt
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"Colbyt" < wrote

I just posted on on 'garage shelf project article'. You are welcome to lift that one out if it's of use! I presume you need 'permission' so here it is. You are welcome to snag that and I'll even repeat it here for you:
I assume the home organization area fits best?
If you need my name, I have no problem posting it. Carol Shenkenberger. Credits not required unless you want to. ;-)
------
Here's another I got a long time ago and works nicely in my somewhat crowded garage for a craft table that can be lowered out of the way in winter to make room for the car. It's perfect if you have a longish car and a shortish garage so need that extra space at the end. This lets you use that space for a table for crafting when you can leave the car out. Thats most of the year where we are!
Skill level minimal but will need second person to hold things. Second person can be a kid if they can hold up the parts for you while you nail. Third person optional but easier. Mostly you need the extra person when first attaching to the studs. This is a winner to intro kids to a little project. Estimate 30 mins time.
Tools and parts: old solid wood door (not too warped) or other wood about same size (28-32inches by 6ft roughly). 6-8ft of 2x3 or 1x2. 2-3 large heavy duty long thin hinges with 4 or more nail holes each 'leaf' (one per stud for the area that the door will hang, more is better). 2 smaller long thin but heavy hinges for the 'legs'. Nails, hammer, saw, pencil or magic marker.
Use an old (hopefully solid) wood door with a flat surface. You can use plywood or pressboard also but they may be more prone to warpage over time. Pressboard especially so.
Use 'worst side' as bottom. If there is a hole where a knob was, design so that is towards the wall. Place door propped against wall and use marker or pencil to mark where the heavy big hinges will attach to the studs. Attach these to the 'door'.
Now lift door (need second person and 3rd is optimal) and attach hinges to studs so that it swings down pretty much flush to the wall. How high depends on how tall you (or wife) wants it for easy work. If she plans to sew there, you'll want it low enough for a chair yet high enough to stand and work a pattern on with comfort. If you are going to do much 'crafting' there, please use a level to make sure you get it as even as you can.
Next, lift 'door' up and measure off 2 'legs' for each corner. 1x2 will work but we used 2x3 as we had it. I held the door and Don used a level then a pencil to mark the wood. Cut then using smaller hinges, attach these pieces so they fold up towards the center. Depending on how high you went, you may need to place one of the 'legs' inwards vs just at the corner so they fold neatly without running into each other. When stowed flush to the wall, this takes up about 3 inches but when folded out, gives a nice big work surface.
Now you have a fine little extra table for crafting, sewing, kids projects that are messy, etc. If you have some old linoleum or sheet vinyl to glue or nail on top, it becomes easy cleanup too and I've been known to use it for rolling out bread dough after cleaning it up first since I have limited counterspace.
Expansion ideas on this: If you plan to put a sewing machine on the table, use 2 legs on each side (2 of them more towards the center and offset from each other as above if needed). If using center legs (IE: 4 of them) get some small 1/2 inch or so trim wood (anything spare you have laying around) and use this nailed on the underside to 'bolster' the center legs so that they will not sag in time when stowed since the legs are attached just with hinges at the top. This makes a fine light crafting table but is not suitable for really heavy equipment.
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Absolutely. Fitting new construction windows will mean removing the exterior trim at least. If you have vinyl or aluminum siding you may have to remove siding depending on how the siding is trimmed to the existing windows. If you have wood siding you will probably have to recut the siding in place all around the window and construct new wider trim to cover the nailing flange and trim out to the newly cut siding.. And much depends on how closely you can match the new windows to the original sizes.
--
Dennis


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What if you have brick for both the exterior walls and sills? Apparently replacement windows are offered to be installed both from the inside as well as the exterior openings. Can anybody give me a rough estimate of how many hours of total labor would be involved to install one replacement double hung window roughly 54" high and about 30 inches wide in a brick opening which previously held an aluminum double hung window? What is a typical cost for the labor to put in a window like this?
Again, many thanks,
Smarty

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