Replace spark plugs

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2.4L-4cyl motor

he's lucky he didn't have an interference engine. Then he would have had to have the motor rebuilt,after some valves crashed into pistons.
I had a timing belt break on an 74 Civic CVCC,no damage,motor spun real fast when cranking it. I forget what it cost to replace,but it wasn't much. Maybe a couple $100.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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I felt that way on my BMW at first, every under the hood job seemed to start" remove fluid and radiator" but the radiator really came out easily and it really was the first step to doing anything near the front of the engine. It turned out to be time well spent.
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On 10/21/2010 12:20 PM, LSMFT wrote:

You are placing the blame squarely in the wrong place. Having a pretty good familiarity with internal workings of companies I can tell you it wasn't the engineering dept that overtly made the crappy design.
The primary drivers of final product are the bean counters trying to make a buck while building the cheap stuff that many demand and the marketing folks world where form always trumps function.
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Does anybody remember "Unsafe at any speed", quoting the infamous "Let 'em burn!"
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I remember Nader's 'Unsafe' in the 60's- directed at the Corvair & GM. 'Let 'em burn' sounds like Ford on their 1970's Pinto. Are you conflating, or did I miss something.
Jim
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wrote:

The problems with the Corvair had been fixed by the time that book came out.
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On 10/21/10 12:20 pm, LSMFT wrote:

Picking on the Americans in this instance is not a good idea. Back in the 1950s, the UK _Sunday Express_ newspaper had a review of a new Rolls-Royce model on which to access the spark plugs (which in those days needed to be replaced far, far more frequently than today's 100K-mile plugs) one had first to remove each front wheel in turn, then remove an access panel that was secured by a large number of bolts. The reviewer had contacted Rolls-Royce about this and criticized the design, only to be told: "But Sir, doesn't your chauffeur look after this for you?"
Perce
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Is the Malibu like my 2001 Impala? I always wondered why they left that big honking 'U' of steel on top of the engine. I thought it was how they lifted the engine into place. Turns out it is to hook your come-along to in order to pull the engine far enough forward to replace the rear plugs.
The book said I'd need to drop the exhaust, remove a motor mount and unhook some other stuff, but my mechanic told me that I could probably get away without all that. He was right. The Malibu is smaller, so you might not have that 'extra' 1/2 inch. I think I'd pay the $200 today.
Even with the motor pulled forward, I felt like a pretzel by the time I got those 3 out.
Jim
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wrote:

On a late 60's Chevy V-8, they did not yet have the "U" for lifting.
I had to un-bolt the motor mount, use a floor jack and then lift the motor -- all for _one_ plug! Then wiggle my ears and hold my mouth right.
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On 10/21/2010 11:41 AM, p4o2 wrote:

I don't know but on my 2000 Taurus (which is a front wheel drive vehicle) I've never even seen the back row of plugs. The firewall gets in my way. The labor in servicing the plugs on that bank is more than I'd want to mess with although I wouldn't hesitate on a rear wheel drive engine.
But the fact that you can't see what you're working on makes all the difference.... and more expensive, I'd assume.
Jay
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p4o2 wrote:

I owned a car maybe 35 years ago which had a panel on the firewall under the dash you removed to get at one or more spark plugs.
My memory is weak, I can't recall the year, make or model, just that removable panel. <G>
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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on some 6 cylinder engines getting at the back plugs requires raising the engine up. Raising the engine is actually very easy when you know the trick. You need to find which engine mount prevents the engine from rotating - there is usually one that does that. You put the car in Park without the parking brake on, remove the bolt to the engine block and push the car forward about 2 or 3 inches. The engine will rotate upwards and forwards. You kick a piece of wood under the wheel to keep the car from rolling backwards. The engine will stay up nicely while you change the back plugs. When you are done just kick the wood loose and the car will roll back a bit and the engine will drop back down. Replace the mount bolt. That sure beats trying to figure out how to jack up the engine.
That trick wouldn't work on a Plymouth Acclaim. There was room at the back to get out two plugs but the third one was under the accesory mount. I got it out with a universal jointed socket but it was a difficult job. The plug had never been changed and was totally plugged with soot.
If you have the type of engine that rotates on it's mounts then the job is simple. If it is like the Acclaim then its no wonder the garages want $191; I would, too, because the job is a bugger.
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Just remember to do it with the engine cold and it's less than 1/10th the issue it is with the engine hot!!!!
On my PT Cruiser 2.4, remove intake manifold. On my wife's 2.5 Mystique - rem0ve intake manifold On my old 3.8 Pontiac transport, remove ignition coils and swear one blue streak. On the 2 Ford Aerostar 3.0 engines I had a few years back, 2 from the doghouse, 2 from under the left fender, and 2 from under the right fender, or put it on the hoist and with the right combination of extentions and flexes, change the whole works in 10 minutes - and mabee a couple od scuffed knuckles. Try it hot and you were asking for a trip to emerg.
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I miss my 71 Ford pickup. To change plugs (300 ci 6 cylinder) Open hood. Climb over left front fender. Stand on ground between fender and engine. change plugs. I can't even find some of the plugs on our Dodge Caravan and Infiniti QX4 ....ww
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/Replace-spark-plugs-591810-.htm Nestor Kelebay wrote: Reno wrote:
I get annoyed sometimes when I hear about the way American cars are designed and manufactured. My sister had a Ford Taurus and had to pay over $700 to replace the fuel pump in it. That's cuz the fuel pump was inside the gas tank, and they had to drop the gas tank out of the car to replace that fuel pump.
I, on the other hand, had a Toyota Corolla at the time. The fuel sending unit on that car went, and I got a replacement one from one of my local auto wreckers. Toyota engineers and designers had the foresight to provide a removable panel under the carpet in the trunk of my car situated directly above the fuel sending unit. That little bit of thinking on their part saved thousands of their customers a lot of money. That same thinking on Ford's part would have saved their customers money too, but they didn't include such a panel.
I sincerely believe that GM, Ford and Chrysler intentionally include such "oversights" into their cars in order to provide their dealerships with greater income from repairs to the cars they sell.
That's why I'm sticking to Toyotas and Hondas, and won't buy an American car until the engineers in Detroit start exhibiting the same presence of mind to include replaceable panels where necessary as Toyota and Honda engineers have done for decades. Let GM sleep in the bed it makes for itself, and let the dam government buy the cars of the companies they're keeping afloat and eventually it'll occur to someone that better quality makes economic sense. Making cars both difficult and expensive to fix is a way of driving away customers, and not an effective way of increasing revenue.
------------------------------------- ..in solidarity with the movement for change in Iran.
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Some of the "shade tree mechanics" have learned to take a hole saw and cut holes in the car to get at things like that and some things under the hood. Saves a lot of time for them and money for the owner.
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Rule of thumb: Never buy a vehicle where you cant fit your whole body under the hood.
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